Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 20th October 2011

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Afternoons, Business News, CEISMIC, Checkpoint, Human Rights in Papua, Midday Report, Monumental New Zealand, Morning Report, News Stories, Ngā Uruora, Nights, Nine To Noon, On Safari, Our Changing World, Pole To Pole, Rural News, Te Manu Korihi, The Best Medicine, Upbeat, You Me... Now!

Afternoons

Best Song Ever Written - Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines
Colin Smith from Mandeville near Gore has chosen Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (from the movie soundtrack). [more]

Your Place - Kumara
Once again this week we travel to the South Island's West Coast and to the town which counts among it's sons, New Zealand's longest serving Prime Minister, Richard John Seddon. [more]

Winner of the X Challange million dollar prize
After the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster last year, the wife of Google chief executive, Wendy Schmidt, decided a million dollar carrot might persuade companies to come up with new ways to skim oil off water faster. [more]

Talking about shoes
Maxine Cook has a shoe collection that would be the envy of many women around the world. There are all types: boots, slingbacks, satin shoes, high heels. Now Maxine has parlayed her passion for footwear into an award winning speech. She's the top of the South Island Toastmaster champion and will go on to compete in the National Championships in Tauranga in a few weeks. [more]

The Arts Report
John Brebner and his wife Alison run Homeprint - a company which offers workshops and courses in letterpress printing, binding, papermaking and framing. John - a retired teacher - also collects art and represents artists. The limited edition books he produces are works of art in themselves. [more]

Southern Story for 20 October 2011 - Old Timers Clock Museum
Don Tappin manufactures clocks and exports them around the globe. More recently, he's brought the world of clocks to Christchurch, showcasing a selection of rare and international time pieces at his Old Timers Clock Museum. [more]

Our Changing World - Able-X
There are an estimated 45,000 stroke survivors in this country, and a device designed here in New Zealand is helping some of them regain mobility. The device is called Able-X and Ruth Beran goes to Te Papa to meet the designer, Marcus King from IRL and stroke survivor Leslie Austin. [more]

The Panel Pre-Show for 20 October 2011
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. [more]

The Panel with Anna Chin and Chris Trotter (Part 1)
Topics - Protesters in central Auckland have refused to allow themselves to be "moved-on" from a World Cup fan zone for Sunday's final. Bankers involved in the float of Trade Me say it will value the online auction website at up to 1.26 billion dollars - with a sale possible before Christmas. [more]

The Panel with Anna Chin and Chris Trotter (Part 2)
Topics - New Zealand First has defended its dumping of an election candidate who drank his own urine on TV. Pharmac, the Government's drug funder, last week rejected another appeal by Pompe sufferers for an enzyme replacement therapy treatment called Myozyme which costs $1 million a year per patient. [more]

Business News

Morning Business for 20 October 2011
News from the business sector including a market report. [more]

Markets Update for 20 October 2011
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Midday Business News for 20 October 2011
Goodman Fielder plans to merge its New Zealand businesses. Greece's creditors may have to accept bigger writedowns of what they're owed and the sharemarket falls. [more]

Evening Business for 20 October 2011
News from the business sector including a market report. [more]

Evening Business for 20 October 2011
A Windflow Technology shareholder has agreed to stump up the extra cash to complete the turbinemaker's crucial share purchase plan. [more]

CEISMIC

GNS questioned on amount of warning given prior to quake
The warnings, or lack of them from the government's scientists about the likely size of aftershocks following the first Canterbury earthquake have been a focus of the Royal Commission into the quakes. [more]

Manu Korihi News for 20 October 2011
A direct descendant of a lower North Island chief, who signed the Tiriti o Waitangi, says the founding document should be housed at Te Papa Tongarewa or go on tour; Motiti Islanders are collecting bags of toxic rubbish - from the debris that've come ashore from the stranded ship in the Bay of Plenty; The police are praising Ngai Tahu for the use of a marae as a one-stop crime and justice shop - as Christchurch continues to recover from the earthquake; An Auckland taniwha researcher says there seems to be a growing understanding of the spiritual guardians who serve as warnings to protect local waterways, and how important it is to respect wahi tapu or sacred sites. [more]

Manu Korihi News for 20 October 2011
The police are praising Ngai Tahu for the use of a marae as a one-stop crime and justice shop - as Christchurch continues to recover from the earthquake; A direct descendant of a lower North Island chief, who signed te Tiriti o Waitangi, says the founding document should be housed at Te Papa Tongarewa, or go on tour; An Auckland taniwha researcher says there seems to be a growing understanding of the spiritual guardians who serve as warnings to protect local waterways, and how important it is to respect wahi tapu or sacred sites. [more]

Checkpoint

Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 20 October 2011
The man police shot in Hawkes Bay was unarmed. A National Finance director is jailed for six years and nine salvors on board the container ship Rena have started pumping oil again and are expecting to work throughout the night. [more]

The man police shot in Hawkes Bay was unarmed
The man shot in the chest by police because he said he had a gun and was going to use it, was unarmed and possibly pointing a glass bottle at the officer from underneath his sweatshirt. [more]

Salvors expecting to work through the night
Nine salvors on board the container ship Rena have started pumping oil again and are expecting to work throughout the night. [more]

Fire service - truckie lucky not to have drowned
A truckie hurt in a plunge off a bridge near Temuka might have drowned if the crash had happened 24 hours earlier. [more]

Former National Finance director jailed for 6 years
A director of the failed finance company, National Finance, has been sent to jail for six years. [more]

Injured All Black Dan Carter says he's recovering well
All Black Dan Carter who was forced out of the Rugby World Cup by a groin injury has told a crowded news conference in Auckland that he's recovering well from the subsequent surgery. [more]

Rugby World Cup sales target exceeded
Rugby World Cup organisers say they have reached their revenue target of $268,500,000. [more]

Sports News for 20 October 2011
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Quake couldn't have been predicted
GNS scientists say even if they had found and mapped the unknown Canterbury faultlines after the September quake they would not have been able to predict the devastating February shake. [more]

Lotto's latest millionaire almost missed out
A Hamilton man spent 5 weeks oblivious to the fact he was carrying a Lotto ticket worth a million dollars around in his pocket - Karen Jones from New Zealand Lotteries explains. [more]

Closing arguments in Auckland murder case
The Crown says text messages between two friends are key evidence in their case against a man accused of murdering young Auckland woman Kiko Li. [more]

Pharmacists set to play bigger role
Pharmacists are set to play a much bigger role in patient care following a pilot study released today. [more]

Gay marriage supporters take their message to Parliament
One of the main streets in Wellington had to be blocked off this afternoon to make way for a 300 strong protest group, marching to Parliament in support of same sex marriage. [more]

France gives a black rugby statue to Christchuirch
The French Sports Minister has presented Christchurch with a two-point-three metre high black statue of a Rugby player running forward with 14 shadows trailing behind. [more]

Nine salvors on board the container ship Rena
Nine salvors on board the container ship Rena have started pumping oil again and are expecting to work through the night. [more]

Filipinos downplay reports of abuse over Rena, offer to help
Filipinos living in Tauranga are downplaying reports people have abused them over the grounding of the container ship Rena. [more]

Questions raised at quake hearing about preparedness
Questions have been raised at the Royal Commission hearings about how well prepared Canterbury towns are to deal with a significant aftershock. [more]

Latest on flooding in Bangkok
People living in seven of the nine districts in Bangkok have been told to move cars and valuables to higher ground because of rising flood waters. [more]

Sports News for 20 October 2011
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Human Rights in Papua

Human Rights in Papua
2009 marked the 40th anniversary of the incorporation of the Papua region into Indonesia. A controversial UN sponsored referendum decided the former Dutch colony's destiny in 1969, but there's still resistance to Indonesian rule. Johnny Blades of Radio New Zealand International looks at the events of 2009. [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 20 October 2011
A Hawke's Bay man's in a critical condition after being shot by a police officer and Salvors prepare to pump oil from the Rena. [more]

Midday Sports News for 20 October 2011
The All Black assistant coach Steve Hansen says it's testament to the whole squad that 3 new players have been nominated for the IRB player of the year. [more]

Monumental New Zealand

Part 1 - That Graced This Site
At Victoria University in Wellington, an unofficial memorial plaque pays tribute to a tree sacrificed to make space for one more car park. While memorials to trees aren't common in this country, memorials of other kinds certainly are. Every town has a war memorial or two, most have historic markers and commemorative plaques, and a few have statues to famous sons and daughters. It seems there's a near universal urge in this country to physically record our memories in stone or bronze or marble. But what do we remember with these monuments and why? Who decides who we commemorate? And can we really freeze history just by building a statue to it? [more]

Part 3 - He Loved The People
There are no less than three swimming pools named for the late Labour Prime Minister Norman Kirk in this country. And while that's great, it's not quite the same thing as, say, the impressive Michael Joseph Savage Memorial at Bastion Point, or the Massey Memorial above Wellington harbour. How -and why - did we move from the impressively ornamental to the useful but mundane? Are we no longer impressed by our politicians? And why did we feel the need to memorialize them in the first place? Justin Gregory travels to Waimate to dip his toe in the pool, and ask a few questions. [more]

Part 4 - My History, Right Or Wrong
A weakness most monuments share is a tendency to fix one view of history, often a view not everyone shares. The Moutoa Monument in Moutoa Gardens, Wanganui, is a perfect example. Erected by grateful settlers to honour local Maori who died defending the town against the Hau Hau, it uses some pretty strong language to describe what was essentially a ritualized battle between close family members. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Thursday 20 October 2011
Salvage workers closely monitoring crack in Rena's hull, Svitzer gives update on salvage efforts on Rena, Rena disaster directs spotlight toward oil opposition, Hawke's Bay man shot by police, Labour says govt's policies won't stave off downgrade, Irish bookmaker pays out early on All Blacks win, Government to pilot drug court in Auckland, Expulsions at 10-year high. [more]

Salvage team hopes to resume oil pumping off Rena today
Flotsam and oil from the Rena is now washing up on beaches as far east as Waihau Bay, the East Coast setting for the hit movie Boy. [more]

Pacific News for 20 October 2011
The latest from the Pacific region. [more]

Rena clean up efforts escalate
Clean up efforts will soon be underway along the Bay of Plenty coast, as oil and debris from the Rena spreads further and further east. [more]

Salvage workers closely monitoring crack in Rena's hull
Improving weather means work is likely to resume on pumping oil from the Rena today. [more]

Svitzer gives update on salvage efforts on Rena
With us is the spokesperson for the Svitzer Salvage company, Matthew Watson. [more]

Rena disaster directs spotlight toward oil opposition
The fate of the Rena disaster is being used by those opposed to deep sea drilling protesters to push their cause. [more]

Hawke's Bay man shot by police
A 48-year-old Central Hawke's Bay man is in a stable condition in Hawke's Bay Hospital after being shot by police early this morning. [more]

Labour says govt's policies won't stave off downgrade
The Prime Minister says he can't rule out a credit downgrade by ratings agency Moody's. [more]

Irish bookmaker pays out early on All Blacks win
In Ireland, a major bookmaker is so certain New Zealand will win the Rugby World Cup final, it's already started paying out on bets. [more]

Government to pilot drug court in Auckland
Forget night courts, Auckland is to have a drug court. [more]

Expulsions at 10-year high
The number of students expelled from school has hit a ten-year high, with more than one third of the cases due to drugs. [more]

Sports News for 20 October 2011
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Embattled Australia, Wales attempt rally for bronze final
Members of the Australian and Welsh sides say it may be hard to rise to the occasion for tomorrow's Rugby World Cup bronze final - dubbed "the losers final" by some. [more]

Study: chemists could be used more in medicine management
A study out today says giving pharmacists a bigger role in managing medicines for some patients improves care and saves money. [more]

Violent clashes in Athens over austerity measures
In Athens, there have been violent clashes between protestors and police at a rally of thousands in front of the Greek parliament. [more]

Man shot after threatening to kill a police officer
A 48-year-old Central Hawke's Bay man is in a stable condition in hospital after being shot by police early this morning. [more]

Fears over widening crack in crippled ship Rena
Work on pumping oil from the stricken container ship Rena should resume today as the weather in Tauranga continues to improve. [more]

Bay of Plenty's weather conditions expected to improve
Better weather is forcast for today in the Bay. [more]

Govt queries Auckland's plan to restrain urban sprawl
The government is at odds with Auckland Council's blueprint for the future. [more]

Drug foundation wary if drug court will work with resources
The New Zealand Drug Foundation is welcoming a court that will deal solely with drug offences but wonders if there will be the resources to help vulnerable people. [more]

Anxious weekend ahead for All Blacks supporters.
If you're feeling nervous as the All Blacks Rugby World Cup semi-final draws near, you're not alone. [more]

All Blacks admit they're overwhelmed by local support
The All Blacks admit that they've been swept up with the support New Zealand is showing to them and the World Cup tournament. [more]

Sports News for 20 October 2011
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Wild animals on the loose in Ohio
They escaped from an exotic animal park near the city of Zanesville after the man who looked after them died. [more]

Residents will refuse to move off Motiti Island
Residents on Motiti Island say they would rather die than leave their home, even if they are unable to solve the problem of oil washing up on their beaches from the stranded Rena. [more]

Riot police clear Dale Farm in Essex
British police in riot gear have removed residents from Dale Farm in Essex - the UK's largest so-called travellers site. [more]

Ngā Uruora

Part 1 - The Immense Trees of Oruarangi
Ecologist Geoff Park examines the impact of European agriculture on the Hauraki Plains country, once the site of the richest pre-colonial Maori culture. It's also where the country's future landscape was shaped. [more]

Part 2 - The Perfect Vale
Petone foreshore was the 'beachhead' of the New Zealand Company who had arrived expecting to find tens of thousands of acres of flat land suitable for agriculture. Settlers were to be bitterly disappointed. [more]

Part 3 - The Riverbend
Ecologist Geoff Park goes in search of the reason why a small stand of ancient Kahikatea trees on a bend of the Mokau River has survived, despite the onslaught of forest-clearing and dairying. [more]

Part 4 - The Lake in the Sand Country
Papaitonga is the name that Sir Walter Buller gave to his country estate. It was his site for a 'grand theatre' of Maori artefacts, and also the place where the philosophy of modern conservation was formed. [more]

Part 5 - The Sandplain Forest
The continued existence of the fragile Nikau Scenic Reserve near Paparoa is an anomaly amidst the dairy country. As it turns out, it's survival is linked to the story of the Western Black Petrel. [more]

Part 6 - Necessary Protection
What significance should be placed on a few surviving remnants of the pre-agricultural landscape of Aoteraoa, and what would Joseph Banks made of his 'properest place for a colony...'? [more]

Nights

Farm Work
Getting people to work in the American farming industry with rancher, lawyer and author Nicolette Hahn Niman, and how changes to ecological-based food systems may help bring those benefits. [more]

Science: Earth Sciences
GNS geologist and paleontologist Dr Hamish Campbell from GNS Science tells us about Curio Bay and the origin of the Middle Jurassic fossil forest floor. [more]

Conundrum
Clue 7. [more]

Conundrum
Clue 8. [more]

Nine To Noon

Denis Fitzmaurice
An internal report is critical of the way Canterbury fire service management handled the immediate response to the February quake. Denis Fitzmaurice is the president of the Southern branch of the NZ Professional Firefighters' Union. [more]

Gab Kovacs
IVF pioneer says women considering egg freezing for social reasons should think about settling for 'Mr Not-Too-Bad' [more]

UK Correspondent - Ann Leslie
'Travellers' evicted from Essex and the investigation of Liam Fox. [more]

Feature Guest - Michael Kirby
Michael Kirby is Australia's longest serving high court judge and author of A Private Life: Fragments, Memories, Friends, which describes his private life as a gay man - one who for decades effectively hid his relationship with his partner Johan van Vloten. [more]

Book Review - The Magic of Reality
The Magic of Reality - How We Know What's Really True written by Richard Dawkins, reviewed by Gyles Beckford and published by Bantam Press. [more]

New technology with Steve McCabe
Microsoft's US$8.5 billion purchase of Skype, Google drops Buzz and the death of software tool creator Dennis Ritchie. [more]

Parenting / child specialist - Diane Levy
Looking at swearing and bad behaviour, how to react, when to react. [more]

TV review with Simon Wilson
Series 2 of Downton Abbey, The Rugby World Cup coverage and Soho Channel. [more]

On Safari

Part 1 - On Safari
Lynn discovers not only lions and elephants in the Serengeti and Masai Mara national reserves, but also how tourism is transforming the countries' economies and how young Masai are walking both traditional and contemporary paths. [more]

Part 2 - On Safari
Lynn visits the De Wildt Cheetah Sanctuary. Cheetahs may be the fastest land animals on earth today, but they can't outrun mankind. Their habitat is under threat, they remain the target of some farmers worried about stock losses, and if they're injured, they have no chance of surviving in the wild. The De Wildt Cheetah Sanctuary out of Pretoria in South Africa cares for injured cheetahs, returning them to the wild whenever possible, and caring for those who can't fend for themselves. In this episode of a two part look at the Sanctuary, Lynn Freeman talks to the founder Ann van Dyk and to her dedicated team, goes on the feeding rounds, and falls utterly under the cheetah's spell. [more]

Part 3 - On Safari
Lynn concludes with the second part of her visit to the De Wildt Cheetah sanctuary outside Pretoria in South Africa. The sanctuary is not only salvation to old, ill and injured cheetahs. It is home to injured vultures and to the largest captive population of the endangered wild dogs. Educating young South Africans about the value of wildlife is another vital role the sanctuary plays. [more]

Our Changing World

Buddleia Biocontrol
The butterfly bush has been a weedy problem in young pine plantations but the buddleia leaf weevil is having a good impact [more]

Secretins
Scientists are targeting the giant channels in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria to try and develop better treatments [more]

Electrochemistry
Electrodes and microbes that could be tiny power plants, and other uses of electrochemistry [more]

Rod Morris on the Denniston Plateau
Wildlife photographer Rod Morris talks about the plateau's remarkable wildlife, and why he believes it should be protected [more]

Pole To Pole

Part 1 - Pole to Pole
Deutsche Welle's Irene Quaile takes you to some of the northern-most communities on the planet, including a research station on Spitsbergen in the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago about halfway between Scandinavia and the North Pole. In the small town of Barrow, at the northern tip of Alaska more than 500 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, the Inupiat people describe how climate change is affecting their traditional way of living off the ocean and to the rhythm of the sea ice. [more]

Part 2 - Pole to Pole
Join the ABC's Margo Foster aboard the icebreaker Aurora Australis as she travels to east Antarctica with an international group of scientists exploring marine biodiversity. The Southern Ocean and east Antarctica are often described as the black hole of biodiversity - the largest area of the planet that remains mostly unexplored and undescribed, but is expected to host a diverse community of creatures and plants highly adapted to their environment. The destination of the voyage is Commonwealth Bay, where the teams take samples of the water column and seabed as part of the Census of Marine Life. [more]

Part 3 - Pole to Pole
Veronika Meduna travels to Scott Base to join drillers and scientists as they unearth sediment cores from underneath the Ross Ice Shelf. [more]

Rural News

Morning Rural News for 20 October 2011
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Midday Rural News for 20 October 2011
News from the rural and farming sectors. [more]

Te Manu Korihi

Manu Korihi News for 20 October 2011
The Northland Regional Council says it wants to help eliminate the negative statistics that have dragged Maori down by improving better iwi representation on the authority; Government officials are holding back on releasing public views on the Early Childhood Education Taskforce's recommendations, on Te Kohanga Reo National Trust Board; A prominent Maori film director and writer says an ongoing inability by many film makers to consult with Maori on cultural issues, needs to change. [more]

Manu Korihi News for 20 October 2011
Government officials are holding back on releasing public views on the Early Childhood Education Taskforce's recommendations, on Te Kohanga Reo National Trust Board; The Northland Regional Council says it wants to help eliminate the negative statistics that have dragged Maori down by improving better iwi representation on the authority; Dial a Maori, the art of consultation was the subject of a debate in Wellington last night which the independent body Script to Screen organised; The colour of pillowcases in Canterbury hospitals is helping to reduce the risk of infection - and at the same time respect Maori cultural values. [more]

The Best Medicine

Part 1 - Humour
Amelia Nurse talks with writer and evolutionary theorist Alastair Clarke. His book - 'Humour's Contribution to Human Ingenuity' will be published by Pyrrhic Press on 9 November 2009. [more]

Part 2 - Humour
This week Amelia Nurse considers NZ's comedic track record. She talks to sociologist Mike Lloyd from Victoria University in Wellington. [more]

Part 3 - Humour
Amelia Nurse talks to joyologist Pat Armitstead and to members of the Wellington Improvisation Troupe - Anton van Helden, Paul Sullivan, Christine Brooks and Geoff Simmons [more]

Part 4 - Humour
Humour at work - find out whether work is the place for a joke or two - or not... with Dr Barbara Plester from the University of Auckland Business School. [more]

Upbeat

Jan Clarke
President and Deputy Conductor of Tauranga based Scholars Pro Music Chamber Choir performing at Tauranga Arts Festival this weekend. [more]

Teddy Tahu Rhodes
NZ Bass-baritone performing in Auckland with NZSO and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa as part of REAL NZ Festival. [more]

Reuben Bradley
Jazz drummer and winner of NZ Jazz album of the year about to embark on Australasian tour. [more]

You Me... Now!

Episode 52: Hide and Seek
Lucille is managing Joel but the boys are in revenge mode when they arrive. [more]

News stories:

Oil and debris now along East Cape
The East Cape region will be the focus on Thursday for recovery of debris and oil from the container ship Rena which has begun washing up there. [more]

Crack on stricken ship widens
Maritime New Zealand says a crack on the starboard side of a stricken cargo ship off Tauranga has widened. [more]

Air NZ says new planes means lower fares
Air New Zealand says its purchase of new planes will result in lower airfares. [more]

PM not ruling out third credit downgrade
Prime Minister John Key says he can't rule out a third credit downgrade after a visit by ratings agency Moody's to New Zealand. [more]

New Zealand sharemarket up on Wednesday
The New Zealand sharemarket was up when markets closed on Wednesday. [more]

1080 incident report issued
The Environmental Protection Authority reported 34 incidents and complaints on the use of 1080 poison in its annual report on the substance. [more]

Bioplastics workshop unveils new products
A spoon and knife combination, the spife, partly made from kiwifruit waste, is one of a number of eco-friendly products to be unveiled at a bioplastics workshop in Rotorua on Thursday. [more]

Public views on kohanga reo not made public
Government officials are holding back on releasing public views on the Early Childhood Education Taskforce's recommendations on Te Kohanga Reo National Trust Board. [more]

Council keen to improve Maori representation
Northland Regional Council says it wants to help eliminate the negative statistics that have dragged Maori down by improving iwi representation on the authority. [more]

Pillowcase colour helps reduce infection and respect Maori
The colour of pillowcases at hospitals in Canterbury is helping to reduce the risk of infection and at the same time respect Maori cultural values. [more]

Call for film makers to consult Maori on cultural issues
Maori film director and writer Kath Akuhata-Brown says an ongoing inability by many film makers to consult with Maori on cultural issues, needs to change. [more]

"Arrogant" dairy farmers condemned
Northland Regional Council chairman Craig Brown has condemned the ''arrogance'' of dairy farmers who pollute land and water. [more]

Claim wool is losing ground to nylon carpets
A textile industry representative says resurrecting the fortunes of strong wool is going to take more than the wool sector has come up with so far. [more]

All Blacks up for Player of the Year
Three All Blacks make up half the list of nominees for the World Rugby Player of the Year award to be announced on Monday. [more]

Morning Report: local papers
Thursday's headlines: Aftershock forecasts withheld so traumatised people in Christchurch would not be further alarmed; Mt Stuart wind farm work ahead of schedule. [more]

Prolonged drought reversing development gains in Tuvalu
A member of the New Zealand Aid team working in Tuvalu says the prolonged drought is reversing gains made in recent development of the country. Months of dry conditions forced... [more]

Candidate for Kiribati election withdraws at last minute
A candidate who has withdrawn at the last minute from the Kiribati election says people are more interested in the cost of living than issues of climate change. Kiribati goes... [more]

Fat tax first step towards more comprehensive obesity attack
A Yale University food policy researcher says a tax on fatty foods can be a first step towards tackling obesity. The comment comes as Fiji's interim government confirms it plans... [more]

KiwiSaver providers urged to clearly explain scheme
KiwiSaver providers are being urged to clearly explain the scheme's complex concepts and terminology to members, especially if enrolment becomes automatic. [more]

European raiders dominate Melbourne Cup favouritism
European gallopers have a stranglehold on the market for the Melbourne Cup. Yesterday's Geelong Cup, a significant leadup race, was won most impresively by the French raider Dunaden, following in... [more]

Gym chief takes golf club to sumo wrestlers
A sumo gym chief who beat wrestlers with a golf club has got a severe dressing down in the latest twist to a year of scandal for the ancient Japanese... [more]

Indonesian security forces open fire at Papuan Congress
Reports emerging from Indonesia's Papua province say security forces have opened fire on delegates attending the Third Papuan People's Congress in Jayapura. West Papua Media Alerts reports that military troops... [more]

Fiji's CC calls for drop in healthy food price to accompany fat tax
The head of Fiji's Consumer Council says a tax on fatty food applied in a Pacific Island country will differ from a similar tax in a European setting. Premila Kumar's... [more]

State of emergency expected to last for some time in Tuvalu
A member of the New Zealand aid team operating in drought stricken Tuvalu believes the country's state of emergency won't be lifted for some time. Development manager with the New... [more]

US debt holdings lowred by China
China has reduced its holdings of US debt to their lowest level in a year. It sold $US36.5 billion in US Treasuries in August. [more]

Former Kiribati cabinet minister says people should remember four years of problems
A former Kiribati cabinet minister says people should use their heads when they vote in tomorrow's election. The republic votes in the first of two rounds tomorrow, choosing 44 MPs... [more]

Samoa newspaper editor to fight wilful damage charge
The editor in chief of the Samoa Observer, Savea Sano Malifa, will stand trial in February next year on a charge of wilful damage. Savea, who's a high chief of... [more]

Irish bookmaker pays out early on NZ win
A bookmaker in Ireland is so certain New Zealand will win the Rugby World Cup final on Sunday that it's already started paying out on bets. [more]

Offshore markets mixed
Stocks have fallen on Wall St after lower than expected sales of Apple's iPhone. However, European markets were up. [more]

SEC fraud charges settled by Citigroup
US bank Citigroup is paying $US285 million to settle civil fraud charges from the Securities and Exchange Commission. [more]

All Blacks overwhelmed by home support
The All Blacks say they have been swept up with the support New Zealand is showing to them and the Rugby World Cup tournament. [more]

Petroleum searches should continue
Energy and transport groups say New Zealand should not let oil spills from the stranded container ship Rena stop it searching for petroleum resources. [more]

Government questions long-term Auckland plan
The Government doubts the ability of Auckland Council to keep much of the region's future population growth within existing urban areas. [more]

Oil spill fears off Australia's Lord Howe Island
Investigations are under way into the grounding of a supply ship carrying 20 tonnes of marine diesel fuel in the lagoon of Australia's world heritage-listed Lord Howe Island. The Sydney... [more]

Lighter communal housing rules urged
A public meeting of people wanting to live communal lifestyles has called for an easing of resource consent planning rules that do not permit multiple dwellings on rural land. [more]

Prison employees suspended after escape
Two employees at the Mount Eden Corrections facility have been suspended following the escape of a dangerous prisoner. [more]

Half cent trading for more stocks
More stocks are to be traded on the New Zealand sharemarket in half cent movements. [more]

Australia thump South Africa in one day opener
A superb century partnership between Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke has manufactured a comprehensive 93-run victory for Australia over South Africa in a rain-affected start to the one-day series in... [more]

NBA club owners and players in talks
NBA club owners and locked-out players have resumed talks to end the 11-day shutdown over money issues with more games in the American basketball league likely to be called off... [more]

French don't mind being written off
The French say they're not being drawn into any of the talk that they don't have a chance in Sunday night's final. Despite upsetting the All Blacks twice at World... [more]

Sport: Fiji Rugby to have new coach in place by January
The Chairman of the Fiji Rugby Union has blasted the country's dismal world cup campaign and says a new coach will be in place by the new year. The 2007... [more]

Sport: No Oceania country in FIFA top 100
Oceania does not feature among FIFA's top one hundred football nations, after the latest rankings list was released. New Zealand is still the top ranked team in Oceania, but slipped... [more]

Sport: IOC President to visit Tonga
The President of the International Olympic Committee, Jacques Rogge, will visit Tonga later this month to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Tonga Amateur Sports Association. Mr Rogge and his... [more]

Sport: Guam kayaker fails drugs test
A member of the Guam national mens kayaking team tested positive in a random drug test last month. Guam Kayak and Canoe Federation president Joe John Mantanona told the Pacific... [more]

Fiji chief censor studies information policies in China
Fiji's chief censor has flown to China to learn how to disseminate information that is accurate and balanced. Sharon Smith-Johns, who is the Ministry of Information's permanent secretary, is attending... [more]

Molten metal spilled at steel mill
Tonnes of molten steel was spilled at the Glenbrook steel mill, south of Auckland on Wednesday night. A dam of hardened metal and soil was used to contain the flow. [more]

Murals at youth centre
Young people from Wellington and Christchurch have worked together to create murals for a central city youth centre remembering those who died in the February earthquake. [more]

School expulsions at 10-year high
The number of pupils expelled from school is at its highest for 10 years. More than a third of the cases are due to drugs. [more]

Anti-1080 campaigns likely to increase
Anti-1080 campaigners say more protests are likely. The EPA says says 34 incidents were reported to it in the past year. [more]

Tension in Papua after mass arrest of Congress delegates
The situation remains tense in the capital of Indonesia's Papua province, Jayapura, following hundreds of arrests at the Third Papuan People's Congress. Yesterday's arrests came after Indonesian security forces opened... [more]

Mixed response to new new Game Council
There's been a mixed response to the introduction of legislation to establish a new Game Animal Council. Its functions will include the management of tahr, chamois, wild deer and pigs. [more]

Kiribati opposition says climate warning overplayed by Tong
An opposition politician in Kiribati says President Anote Tong has overplayed the threat from climate change on the international stage. A former president, Teburoro Tito, says people are more concerned... [more]

Labour vows to eradicate homelessness
Labour is vowing to eradicate homelessness under a new election policy being announced on Thursday. [more]

Funding to help solve infrastructure issues in Tonga capital
The Women and Children's Crisis Centre in Tonga says people living in low-lying, densely populated parts of Nuku'alofa are faced with water supply and waste disposal problems every day. A... [more]

Nine dead in PNG clash near Porgera
Nine people in Papua New Guinea have been shot dead and three others seriously injured following a morning raid near the Karik airstrip in Porgera in Enga province. The newspaper,... [more]

Vanuatu appoints first high commissioner to Australia
Vanuatu has appointed the director of the department of foreign affairs as its first high commissioner to Australia. Kalvau Kaloris was confirmed in the post in Canberra by the President,... [more]

Tahiti strike settlement normalises port activity
Talks at French Polynesia's presidency have led to the signing of a deal which has settled three strikes affecting mainly Tahiti's main port. No details of the accord have been... [more]

Sport: Flying Fijians too reliant on overseas players
The Chairman of the Fiji Rugby Union says the World Cup squad was too reliant on overseas-based players who did not perform to expectations. The FRU has completed an inquiry... [more]

Tongan foreign aid project lacks forethought, says MP
A Tongan member of parliament says a new foreign aid project to help solve Nuku'alofa's infrastructure issues lacks a maintenance budget. Dr Sitiveni Halapua, who represents one of the Nuku'alofa... [more]

Teenage killer's sentence reduced
A teenage girl sentenced to serve at least 17 years for her role in the murder of a retired teacher has had her sentence reduced by four years by the Court of Appeal after new psychological reports were considered. [more]

Vanuatu finance director confirms allowance procedure
Vanuatu's Director General of Finance says parliamentary allowances for MPs are being paid out of the appropriate fund. George Maniuri says the parliamentary budget has faced some unforeseen challenges this... [more]

Samoa PM praises Sapolu for criticising rugby referee
Samoa's Prime Minister, Tuilaepa`Sailele`Malielegaoi, has praised the Manu Samoa rugby player, Eliota Fuimaono Sapolu, for speaking out about what he calls the injustices at the Rugby World Cup. The prime... [more]

Protesters happy to share square with revellers
Protesters in Auckland's Aotea Square say they can live in harmony beside Rugby World Cup revellers if the area is used for a fan zone. [more]

Northland girl in hospital with suspected meningitis
Health authorities in Northland are reporting another suspected case of meningitis. [more]

Parliament dissolved for general election
Parliament has been dissolved, marking the beginning of the formal process in the lead-up to the election. [more]

Council applies to expand Cup fanzones
Auckland Council is making a late bid to expand its Rugby World Cup waterfront fan zones and introduce a new one in Aotea Square. [more]

Teams attempt to rally for bronze final
Members of the Australian and Welsh sides say it may be hard to rise to the occasion for the Rugby World Cup bronze final at Eden Park on Friday night. [more]

5 confirmed with measles in capital
The number of confirmed measles cases in Wellington over the past four weeks has risen to five. [more]

France must confront the All Blacks without fear
France must confront the All Blacks without fear and also produce their best performance of the tournament if they are to have any hope of an upset in Sunday's World... [more]

Former Black Cap signs with Auckland again
The former New Zealand international Andre Adams will again be Auckland's overseas professional for the upcoming season. Adams last played internationally for the Black Caps in 2006 and has been... [more]

Redknapp dismisses talk of ending relegation
The Tottenham boss Harry Redknapp has dismissed as scandalous talk of ending relegation from English football's Premier League. Earlier this week Richard Bevan the chief executive of the League Managers... [more]

No resolution to Freeport strike in Papua now in its second month
A spokesperson for the union of striking workers at Freeport McMoran's mine in Indonesia's Papua region says the dispute with the US-based company is no nearer a resolution. This comes... [more]

Dozens injured in Indonesia's crackdown on Papua Congress
Indonesian security forces have injured dozens of people when they broke up a pro-independence meeting of Papuans outside Jayapura. Hundreds of paramilitary police and army troops surrounded the estimated 5,000... [more]

Mortgagee sale of prime Lake Wakatipu land
A prime piece of land on the shores of Lake Wakatipu is to go to mortgagee sale following the developer going bankrupt. [more]

Name change for Wellington reserve
Wellington's Point Dorset Reserve, between Seatoun and Breaker Bay, has been renamed Oruaiti Reserve. [more]

Failed finance company director jailed
A former director of failed company National Finance has been jailed six years for fraud. [more]

Six injured after car crash in Clevedon
Six people are injured after two cars collided in the Auckland township of Clevedon. [more]

Lifeline for Windflow Technology
Windflow Technology has been thrown a last-minute lifeline by a shareholder who will contribute the balance of a $2 million plan to license its intellectual property in the United States. [more]

Gay marriage supporters march on Parliament
About 300 protesters marched on Parliament on Thursday in a bid to convince the New Zealand Government to legalise same-sex marriage and allow gay couples to adopt children. [more]

Researcher says there's a growing understanding of taniwha
An Auckland taniwha researcher says there seems to be a growing understanding of the spiritual guardians thought to live in local waterways. [more]

Plea for Treaty of Waitangi to be at Te Papa or go on tour
A direct descendant of a lower North Island chief, who signed the Tiriti o Waitangi, says the founding document should be housed at Te Papa Tongarewa, or go on tour. [more]

Writer of Porgera gold mine report rejects inaccuracy claims
A community rights advocate who prepared a report citing human rights abuse and health issues in regard to the Porgera gold mine in Papua New Guinea is hitting back at... [more]

Third Papuan People's Congress ends in chaos
The Third Papuan People's Congress in the capital of Indonesia's Papua province has ended amid chaos with Indonesian security forces making mass arrests of delegates. The Congress was just the... [more]

Lombard director 'never considered' warning investors
A director of the failed Lombard Finance has told a court he never considered telling investors about the company's dwindling cash reserves. [more]

Questions raised over region's quake preparedness
Questions have been raised at a Royal Commission hearing on the Canterbury earthquakes about the preparedness of centres surrounding Christchurch to deal with a significant aftershock. [more]

Rugby statue presented to Canterbury
A rugby statue nearly 2.5 metres high has been presented to the Canterbury Rugby Football Union by French Minister of Sport David Douillet. [more]

Samoa census expected to show small drop in population
The Samoan Bureau of Statistics believes next week's national census will show a small decrease in the country's population. The last census was conducted in 2006. Around one thousand four... [more]

Cook Islands has backing for huge infrastructure upgrade
A Cook Islands government official says donor nations are being supportive as the country prepares to tackle a major infrastructure upgrade. The government says investment in infrastructure is vital to... [more]

Teen arrested over Christchurch phone scam
Police have arrested a teenager in connection with a recent phone scam in the Christchurch. [more]

Carter says weekends the toughest
Injured All Black Dan Carter says he is recovering well from surgery but finds it hard to sit on the sidelines and the weekends are tough. [more]

United Future list for election
The United Future Party has released its list for the general election. [more]

Further possible credit downgrade lamented
Labour says the Government could have stopped a potential third credit downgrade from being predicted. [more]

Labour wants to limit overseas investment in farmland
Limiting overseas investment in farmland is one of the key aspects of the Labour Party's agricultural election policy. [more]

France determined to show no fear
France must face the All Blacks without fear and produce their best performance of the tournament if they are to have any hope of an upset in Sunday's Rugby World Cup final, lock Pascal Pape says. [more]

Wider role for pharmacists inevitable, says minister
Health Minister Tony Ryall says it is inevitable that pharmacists will lead the management of an anti-clotting drug for patients. [more]

Police praise marae based crime and justice centre
Police are praising Ngai Tahu for the use of a marae as a one-stop crime and justice shop, as Christchurch continues to recover from the earthquake. [more]

Police talking to man after armed callout
Police have located a man who sparked an armed offenders callout in Wairarapa on Thursday. [more]

Salvors resume pumping oil off Rena
Salvage teams have resumed pumping oil from a stricken container ship off Tauranga after bad weather hampered efforts this week. [more]

Closing submissions in Kiko murder trial
The Crown says even if a man on trial for murdering a young woman did not deliver the fatal stab wound, there is more than enough evidence to prove he is guilty of murder. [more]