Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 3rd July 2014

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Afternoons, At The Movies, Birds, Business News, Checkpoint, Dateline Pacific, Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, Late Edition, Midday Report, Morning Report, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nights, Nine To Noon, Our Changing World, Pacific Correspondent, Parliament - Question Time, Rural News, Te Manu Korihi, The Panel, The Wireless, Upbeat, World & Pacific News

Afternoons

Best song ever written - California Dreaming
Michael Ward from Amberley, Christchurch, has chosen 'California Dreaming' by the Mamas & the Papas. [more]

Simon's A-Z
Go back in New Zealand history about one generation, and you'd find a nation of tea drinkers. Travelers would encounter tea rooms scattered throughout the Dominion, usually in small towns. These were places to refresh oneself from the rigors of the road journey and partake of a nice hot cuppa and a jam and cream scone - all very civilised really. [more]

Arctic trip
If you're a fan of snorkelling in this country, you'll often dip into water temperatures which are less than tropical to say the least. But one New Zealander is taking that to the extreme. She wants to go snorkelling in the Arctic Circle. Emily Dowding-Smith is part of a ten-strong team of women who will attempt a three thousand kilometre relay of the Northwest passage, and it's all about raising awareness of climate change. Emily is an environmental lawyer, and a sustainability advisor for the Team Sedna Epic Expedition. [more]

GNS Tsunami
In the warm waters of Gisborne researchers think they have solved the puzzle of why two tsunami's struck the coast of Gisborne in 1947. The team of GNS Scientists think undersea volcanoes off the East Coast could have the potential to cause tsunamis of up to ten-meters high. GNS Science Tsunami Specialist, William Power explains. [more]

Feature Album - Hot on the Tracks
Today's feature albums offers up smooth and sultry R&B vibes from the 1970s. 'Hot on the Tracks' was the fourth album from the Amercian soul/funk band The Commodores. It was hailed as being the last record the group recorded before being a major cross-over act: from R&B to pop in the late 70s. The 1976 album reached number one on the R&B charts and number 12 on the pop charts. [more]

Rising Bowls Star - Lynda Bennett
Our athletes will soon be making their was to Glasgow for the Commonwealth Games that start on July 23. We have a team of over 200 representing New Zealand in a range of disiplines, including bowls. Lynda Bennett is one of our bowlers. She departs in three days. Lynda only started the sport six years ago, and she's already held a world title. But there's also something rather special about Lynda that makes her stand out among her bowling peers. [more]

House Spiders
There are about 2000 spider species in New Zealand, but the spiders that are found around houses are likely to be an introduced species [more]

The Panel pre-show for 3 July 2014
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. [more]

At The Movies

At the Movies for 3 July 2014
On At The Movies, Simon Morris looks at Taika Waititi's much-anticipated vampire comedy, What We Do In The Shadows, as well as France's most successful comedy in years, The Volcano. Two rather smaller American films look at, respectively, doubles in The Face Of Love, and gay discrimination in 1979 - the year that the Village People were topping the charts. [more]

Birds

Eastern curlew
Listen to the eastern curlew, a long distance migrant with a very long bill and a regular summer visitor to New Zealand. [more]

Business News

Auckland house sales slowed in June but average prices rose
Auckland's largest real estate agency says sales slowed in June with the onset of winter but average prices continued to edge higher as it sold more homes worth more than a million dollars. [more]

The momentum behind online retail sales growth slows
The momentum behind growth in online retail sales continued to slow in May although sales were still 7 percent higher than in May last year. [more]

Record sales of commercial vehicles were recorded in June
Sales of new vehicles are breaking records and reflecting the strength in the New Zealand economy. [more]

Small business confidence in Canterbury at record levels
The Reserve Bank's recent interest rate hike appears to be hurting small business confidence in Auckland. [more]

Midday Markets for 3 July 2014
Little change with US stocks overnight and the NZX 50 Index is up five points. [more]

Evening Business for 3 July 2014
News from the business sector including a market report. [more]

Goodman Fielder shareholders advised to sell ahead of offer
An Australian investment research company is recommending shareholders sell Goodman Fielder shares ahead of a proposed scheme to buy the food manufacturing firm. [more]

Ryman says it can offer full care at boutique Newtown site
Ryman Healthcare says it will still be able to provide the full continuum of care at the village it plans to build in Newtown, even though the site is very much smaller than most Ryman villages. [more]

FMA sends strong signal with prosecutions over failures to file
The Financial Markets Authority has sent a strong signal that it's now firmly focused on current misdemeanors, rather than historical matters. [more]

South Port expects to significantly beat its profit forecast
South Port says it expects its annual profit will be higher than it previously signalled because of stronger than expected cargo flows in the June quarter. [more]

Barfoot & Thompson reports a surge in million-dollar-plus sales
Auckland's largest real estate agency is seeing a surge in sales of houses worth more than a million dollars which has been lifting average prices. [more]

Morning markets for 4 July 2014
After a string of records, the Dow Jones index has finally cracked the 17 thousand mark for the first time in the index's history. [more]

Markets Update for 4 July 2014
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Checkpoint

Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 3 July 2014
Community constable jailed, More from police commander, Former boyfriend jailed for "execution style" murder, McCully accused of appalling negligence, Jailed police officer also did good work in the community, Southern DHB says no cuts to patient services, Freshwater ecologist hits out at water standards and Maori King's son discharged without conviction. [more]

Community constable jailed
A community constable from Hawke's Bay Adam Dunnett has been jailed this afternoon for 22 months for indecently assaulting five teenage girls. [more]

More from police commander
The Hawkes Bay district Superintendent Sandra Venables joins us. [more]

David Harding could be de-registered
The man who led the design work for the collapsed CTV building may still be sanctioned and his career as a chartered professional engineer ended. Mary Wilson talks to IPENZ chief executive Andrew Clelland. [more]

Former boyfriend jailed for "execution style" murder
A High Court judge has told a man who repeatedly stabbed his ex girlfriend and then cut her throat that he's cowardly and weak. [more]

McCully accused of appalling negligence
Labour MPs have accused the Foreign Affairs Minister, Murray McCully, of appalling negligence in the case of a Malaysian diplomat accused of trying to rape a Wellington woman. [more]

Sports News for 3 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Jailed police officer also did good work in the community
More now on the Hawke's Bay police officer, Adam Dunnett who's been sentenced to 22 months in prison for indecently assaulting five young women. [more]

Southern DHB says no cuts to patient services
The Southern district health board says a crackdown on spending after a budget blowout will not affect patient services. [more]

Freshwater ecologist hits out at water standards
Minimum national water quality standards are being introduced for rivers and lakes for the first time but they're already being dismissed as a scam. [more]

Maori King's son discharged without conviction
The Maori King's teenage son has been discharged without conviction on charges of burglary and theft and has been given a conditional discharge without conviction on an earlier charge of drink driving. [more]

Labour policy won't stand in way of rebuild
Labour is promising to rein in the wrecking ball in Christchurch but insists its policy to protect the city's remaining heritage buildings will not get in the way of the rebuild. [more]

Houses struck by lightning in Auckland
Several Aucklanders are counting themselves lucky to be alive after lightning set a bed on fire, travelled under the concrete floor of a home, and flung bits of the tiles around. [more]

Latest on the community constable jailed for indecent assault
Teenage girls have told a court they don't trust the police anymore, as a Flaxmere community constable was jailed for indecently assaulting them. [more]

Mental Health leader says he would have supported breaking law
The head of Mental Health Services in Waikato says he would have supported staff breaking law to restrain a patient, who escaped and then killed a woman. [more]

Surf Lifesaving responds
Returning to our lead story about the jailing of a Hastings community constable for indecently assaulting teenage girls at drunken surfclub parties. The Ocean Beach Surf Club has refused to talk to Checkpoint. The chief executive of Surf Lifesaving New Zealand Paul Dalton is with us now. [more]

US steps up airport security
The United States government will put into place "enhanced security measures" in certain overseas airports with direct flights to America. [more]

New water standards 'a backward step'
New minimum national water quality standards are being labelled 'a scam' by a freshwater ecologist. [more]

Sports News for 3 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Leeza Ormsby escapes with just 10 months in Bali
The  New Zealand expat Leeza Ormsby is being held up in Australia as an example of how to get a light sentence from an Indonesian court. [more]

CPG says government obliged to help poor schools
The Child Poverty Action Group is calling for smaller classes, free breakfasts AND lunches as well as higher pay for teachers in low-decile schools. [more]

Resignation a blow for CTV survivors and victims' families
The man who led the design work for the collapsed CTV building may still be sanctioned and his career as a chartered professional engineer ended. [more]

Dateline Pacific

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 3 July 2014
Vanuatu's PM considers the Melanesian Spearhead Group prospects for West Papua; There are calls in Fiji for clear land policies before the elections; Cook Island voters worry about depopulation; Severe malnutrition in parts of the Pacific; The Vanuatu Government is accused of failing to protect victims of crime. [more]

Vanuatu PM considers MSG prospects for West Papua
Vanuatu's Prime Minister talks candidly about the Melanesian Spearhead Group's latest moves on West Papua. [more]

UNFPA concern over Kiribati overpopulation
The United Nations Population Fund has been in talks with the Kiribati government this week about ways to curb what it calls concerning population growth. [more]

PNG police chiefs to re-look at PM file
Papua New Guinea's top police hierarchy is to re-examine the file around an arrest warrant on the Prime Minister. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 4 July 2014
PNG police to reinvestigate allegations surrounding the Prime Minister over illegal payments; China's rebalancing seen as positive for the region; Kiribati looks at ways to curb population growth; Vanuatu considers Melanesian Spearhead Group prospects for West Papua. [more]

China's rebalancing seen as positive for the region
Pacific Island countries shouldn't be shy about bargaining with China in its hunger for resources to fuel its economy. [more]

Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm

Improving Inanga Breeding Habitat
The Department of Conservation's David Moss explains how people can help to create better breeding habitat for inanga. [more]

Late Edition

Late Edition for 3 July 2014
The government's plans to reduce family violence, the USA wants tighter airport security, and in Dateline Pacific, is the Cook Islands running out of people? [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 3 July 2014
Karly Eddy is jailed for 17 years for murdering his ex-girlfriend and the Government announces national water quality standards. [more]

Midday Sports News for 3 July 2014
Lou Vincent could still have a future in the game says New Zealand's representative on the International Cricket Council, Martin Snedden and All Blacks Dan Carter and Ma'a Nonu will go head-to-head after both were named to start at second five for the Crusaders and Blues Super Rugby sides respectively. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Friday 4 July 2014
Airports around the world go on high alert after reports Al Qaeda has developed a bomb that can't be detected. The son of the Maori king escapes conviction on theft, burglary and drink driving charges and Treasury urges the Government not to loosen its purse strings despite a growing economy. [more]

Interview with Maan Alkaisi on the CTV collapse
Interview with Maan Alkaisi about the CTV collapse. [more]

Sports News for 4 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Pacific News for 4 July 2014
The latest from the Pacific region. [more]

Labour has described southern health proposal as contemptuous
The Labour Party has described a cost-cutting proposal by the Southern Primary Health Organisation as contemptuous. [more]

Christchurch's only rape crisis callout service to close
Christchurch's only Rape Crisis centre will close today because of a thirty thousand dollar shortfall. [more]

Engineer says IPENZ should be replaced to lift standards
Structural engineer John Scarry says the Institution of Professional Engineers should be replaced by a government agency. [more]

Sports News for 4 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Sports News for 4 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

US security rises amid new explosives threat.
International air travel is on heighted alert this morning, amid fears that Islamist terrorists have developed an 'undetectable' bomb which can get through existing screening. [more]

Maori King's son avoids conviction
A former Maori Affairs Minister is railing against a judge's decision to discharge the Maori King's son without conviction on theft, burglary and drink driving charges. [more]

Treasury demands Govt keeps a tight grip on purse strings
Despite a faster growing economy, the Treasury is demanding the Government keeps a tight grip on the purse strings. [more]

Confusion from Malaysian foreign minister on diplomat's return
A Malaysian newspaper is reporting diplomat Muhammad Rizalman will still have diplomatic immunity when he returns to New Zealand to face sex charges. [more]

Engineer says professional body must be replaced
A structural engineer is calling for his professional body to be replaced by a government agency. [more]

Building and Construction Minister on changes to engineering
A man whose wife was killed in the CTV collapse says the Government should have stepped in when Alan Reay quit the professional body to prevent David Harding doing the same thing. [more]

Labour says Southern DHB in desperate state
The Labour Party says the finances of the Southern District Health Board are in a parlous state because of the Government's underfunding. [more]

Schools say services being cut while govt plans spend up
Northland primary principals say if the Government has big money to throw at education - it should be spent on children, not teachers. [more]

Legislation to extend supervision orders passes first hurdle
A law that allows the extension of supervision orders for child sex offenders for more than ten years has passed its first hurdle in Parliament. [more]

Airport security beefed up ahead of credible terror threat
Fears that Islamic terrorists have developed an 'undetectable' bomb are sparking a major upgrade in air travel security around the world this morning, with international airports on increased alert. [more]

MP reveals she was groped by Rolf Harris during NZ visit
National Party MP and former Radio New Zealand presenter Maggie Barry is going public, saying she was groped by Rolf Harris. [more]

Australian town strips honours from Harris'
Staying with Rolf Harris. He will be sentenced in London today. The Head of Abuse law at Slater and Gordon, Liz Dux, says Harris' age and health will be taken into account. [more]

Maori king's spokesman defends judge's decision
The former Maori Affairs Minister Dover Samuels is condemning a district court judge's decision yesterday to discharge the son of the Maori King on charges of theft, burglary and drink-driving. [more]

Final eight to battle it out this weekend in World Cup
It's down to the final eight in the Football World Cup. [more]

Frog experts worry mining company might damage rare habitat
The Accident Compensation Corporation has helped to bankroll a mining project on conservation land which some fear could put one of the world's rarest frogs at risk. [more]

Kerry-Anne Walsh with news from Australia
Let's have a chat to our Canberra correspondent Kerry-Anne Walsh. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Samoan for 4 July 2014
The latest news in Samoan language. [more]

News in Niuean for 4 July 2014
The latest news in Niuean language. [more]

News in Tongan for 4 July 2014
The latest news in Tongan language. [more]

Nights

Crowded Orbits
What happens as more nations send an increasing number of objects into space to orbit the Earth? Dr James Clay Moltz is nothing less than director of the United States Naval Postgraduate School's Project on Advanced Systems and Concepts for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction, and his latest book is Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space. [more]

Science - Botany
Plant ecologist Bec Stanley from Auckland Botanical Gardens on the chlorophyll-filled bio-mass that photosynthesises around us. Today she explains the curious phenomenon of periodic (not annual) production by plants of masses of seeds called mast seeding (we're in a mast year now). [more]

Conundrum - clue 7
Clue number 7. [more]

Conundrum - clue 8
Clue number 8. [more]

Nine To Noon

Former MI6 counter-terrorism head on new security threat
Tighter security measures are in place at airports in the United Kingdom and Europe and on all direct flights to the United States, because of what is being described as a credible security threat - and amid reports that al-Qaeda affiliates in Syria and Yemen are developing bombs to smuggle onto planes, which may not be detectable by current screening. Analysis is provided by Richard Barrett, a former Director of Global Counter Terrorism Operations for Britain's MI6. He held the role both before and after the 9/11 2001 attacks in the United States. From 2004 to 2013 he headed the United Nations Monitoring Team concerning Al Qaeda and the Taliban, and he has also worked for the British government in MI5, and the Foreign Office. He's the co-author of a new report on how the Syrian war has been an incubator for insurgents. Mr Barrett is now Senior Vice President for the Soufan Group in New York. [more]

Is online voting the only way to get young voters engaged?
Massey University Associate Professor Richard Shaw on a new survey of non voting students. [more]

Pacific correspondent Mike Field
A strange row in French Polynesia. The royal Tongan residence in San Francisco is relocated to the suburbs. A lot of 'chief making' happening in Samoa. Fiji's former prime minister Mahendra Chaudhry - fined. [more]

UK Author Emma Healey
Author Emma Healey on writing a who-dunnit where the heroine suffers from alzheimers and must solve a mystery before her mind deteroriates too far. [more]

Book review - The Emperor Waltz
Tilly Lloyd from Unity Books reviews 'The Emperor Waltz' by Philip Hensher, published by Fourth Estate. [more]

Jeremy Taylor with new music
Featuring Roddy Frame, Brian Jonestown Massacre and Chrissie Hynde. [more]

Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
Discusses Lou Vincent's media performances this week, the Black Caps series win, and a look ahead to the quarter finals of the FIFA World Cup, who's hot and who's not. [more]

The week that was
With Te Radar and Michele A'Court. [more]

Our Changing World

Improving Inanga Breeding Habitat
The Department of Conservation's David Moss explains how people can help to create better breeding habitat for inanga. [more]

OCW Mystery Sound 1
The first mystery sound from the 2014-5 Our Changing World opening theme [more]

Smart Seeds and Finding a Treatment for Black Rot
The Smart Seeds programme at Lincoln University has been screening brassica seeds for potential microbial biocontrol agents against black rot and diamondback moths [more]

Recovering from Brain Trauma
British science communicator James Piercy will share his story of recovery from brain trauma at the NZ International Science Festival. [more]

House Spiders
There are about 2000 spider species in New Zealand, but the spiders that are found around houses are likely to be an introduced species [more]

House Spiders
There are about 2000 spider species in New Zealand, but the spiders that are found around houses are likely to be an introduced species [more]

Our Changing World Theme
This is the opening theme for Our Changing World for 2014-5. It is made up of 17 sounds from previous programmes [more]

Our Changing World Theme
This is the opening theme for Our Changing World for 2014-5. It is made up of 17 sounds from previous programmes [more]

Pacific Correspondent

Pacific Correspondent for 3 July 2014
Today we hear from our correspondent the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Mark Rabago. [more]

Parliament - Question Time

Question Time for 3 July 2014
Hon PHIL HEATLEY to the Minister of Finance: How will the Government's fiscal management help to ensure interest rates will remain lower than they were in the previous economic cycle? Hon PHIL GOFF to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister of Foreign Affairs; if so, why? MAGGIE BARRY to the Minister for the Environment: What recent announcements has she made aimed at improving our freshwater management system? DAVID SHEARER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Did he seek any information from MFAT officials on the case of the alleged assault with the intention to rape and waiver of diplomatic immunity by the Malaysian diplomat after his initial briefing on 10 May, 2014 and before the case became public; if not, why not? EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for the Environment: What percentage of river swimming sites, where data is collected, in the most recent Ministry for the Environment Suitability for Swimming Indicator Update were graded poor or very poor? TIM MACINDOE to the Minister of Education: What recent announcements has she made on Better Public Service Targets in education? ANDREW WILLIAMS to the Minister of State Services: What assurances can he give the public of the competence of senior management in the Public Service? CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Is she satisfied that spending $359 million on the Investing in Educational Success Initiative is the best way to lift student achievement? PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Health: What investment has the Government made in new training places for general practitioners? CAROL BEAUMONT to the Minister for Social Development: What input did she have on the new suite of initiatives to prevent family violence and keep women and children safe that were announced yesterday? BRENDAN HORAN to the Minister of Housing: What, if any, specific progress has he achieved on completing housing accords with Tauranga City Council and Western Bays District Council? ANDREW LITTLE to the Minister of Labour: What steps, if any, are being taken to protect working New Zealanders from asbestos or products with asbestos in them? [more]

Rural News

Midday Rural News for 3 July 2014
News from the rural and farming sectors. [more]

Morning Rural News for 4 July 2014
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Te Manu Korihi

Te Manu Korihi News for 3 July 2014
A new strategy designed to rejuvenate Te Reo has been approved by the government - and praised for giving back tribes responsibility for its revitalisation. But there are reservations among some language proponents about whether it will actually work. Laura Bootham reports. [more]

Te Manu Korihi News for 3 July 2014
A new strategy designed to rejuvenate Te Reo has been approved by the government and praised for giving back tribes responsibility for its revitalisation. A former Treaty lawyer hopes the Labour leader David Cunliffe's personal view that the government got the Foreshore and Seabed Act wrong will lead to policy change. The government is introducing the first ever water quality standards for the rivers and lakes of Aotearoa. New figures show more people are using Whanau Ora health services, especially to quit smoking, or be checked for heart disease. [more]

Te Manu Korihi News for 4 July 2014
The Northland Regional Council says it would like all iwi in Northland to be represented on its Maori advisory committee; Members of a Hawke's Bay marae are warning the patiki, or black flounder, could disappear completely from some local rivers if urgent steps are not taken to protect its habitat; A survey to gauge how various workplaces are culturally responsive to their Maori employees aims to find out why some professional Maori leave their jobs; A recent trade delegation of Maori business leaders to Malaysia is being lauded a success by some of those who went. [more]

Te Manu Korihi News for 4 July 2014
Members of a Hawke's Bay marae are warning patiki, or black flounder, could disappear completely from some local rivers - if urgent steps aren't taken to protect its habitat; The Northland Regional Council says it's asked all iwi in Northland to be represented on its Maori advisory committee; A survey to gauge how various workplaces are culturally responsive to their Maori employees aims to find out why some professional Maori leave their jobs; A recent trade delegation of Maori business leaders to Malaysia is being lauded a success by some of those who went. [more]

The Panel

The Panel with Rob Salmond and Irene Gardiner (Part 1)
Topics - Disgraced cricketer Lou Vincent's delivered his public apology this week, he's told his story and aired his dirty laundry on TV3's Third Degree programme last night. He's been banned for life from playing cricket by the England and Wales Cricket Board for match fixing. Where does the buck need to stop in the Malaysian diplomat sex attack case? The issue was passed around like a hot potato yesterday, and then the apologies started flowing. [more]

The Panel - with Rob Salmond and Irene Gardiner (Part 2)
Topics - Cabin crew on British airways could soon be seeing red if their passengers aren't comfortable on board. It's developing a blanket that can measure how much stress your experiencing in a flight - it changes colour depending on your mood. Dunedin stadium streaker Adam Holtslag who was famously tackled during the All Blacks test match last month is now feeling the pain in his pocket. New water quality standards have been made public today, introducing a minimum standard for lakes and rivers. The panel discussed Facebook's experiment on users emotions which caused an outcry - mainly because it was seen as being covert. 700-thousand users - randomly selected - weren't told Facebook was manipulating their news feeds to study the impact of "emotional contagion". [more]

The Wireless

In your hood: Maria Tutaia
In Your Hood is a series that will explore the neighbourhoods of prominent, and up and coming, Kiwi talent. First up, we have Silver Fern Maria Tutaia. [more]

The NZ Film Festival: The Wireless playbook
Ready your spreadsheets: Adam Goodall and Judah Finnigan pick their favourites of the film festival. [more]

Why Vote? panel discussion
The Wireless hosted a panel discussion looking at the value of your vote. Listen to the audio here. [more]

After a disaster, expecting a riot
While doing volunteer work in the Solomon Is, Lance Cash found himself in the aftermath of a natural disaster with simmering tensions threatening to ignite into violence. [more]

Upbeat

Geoffrey Snedden and Neville Brown
When the Wellington Town Hall closed last year for earthquake strengthening, no-one imagined that the cost would balloon from 43 to 60 million dollars. The Wellington City Council now faces a decision - how do they deal with the 110-year-old building, and how much money should they spend? Eva Radich walked through the Wellington Town Hall with Earthquake Resilience project managers Geoffrey Snedden and Neville Brown, who talked her through the building's structural issues and how they might deal with them. [more]

Simon Romanos: The Harlem Quartet
Simon features the Harlem Quartet, and introduces us to some of their award-winning recordings. They are a string quartet made up of first-place laureates of the Sphinx Competition for Black and Latino string players. Formed in 2006, the members are first violinist Ilmar Gavilan, second violinist Melissa White, violist Juan-Miguel Hernandez, and cellist Paul Wiancko. [more]

Maxim Rysanov: Viola
Maxim Rysanov is back in Auckland, and tonight plays his viola arrangement of Tchaikovsky's Rococo Variations with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra. He's performed them many times, ever since his first performance at the 2010 Last Night of the Proms caused such a reaction. [more]

World & Pacific News

1:29pm Pacific Regional News for 3 July 2014
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

3pm Pacific Regional News for 3 July 2014
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

7pm Pacific Regional News for 3 July 2014
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

5am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest Pacific regional and sports news. [more]

6am World, Pacific and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

7am World, Pacific and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 4 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

News stories:

Land policies urged before Fiji elections
A Fiji lobby group, the Citizens Constitutional Forum, has called on politicians to clearly outline their policies on the controversial issue of land before September's election. [more]

FFA unhappy with US no fishing zone
The FFA, the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency, says it is concerned about the United States threat to hugely increase its no fishing zone. [more]

Pitcairn marine reserve at stage one
A decision on Pitcairn Island's marine reserve proposal could be made by the end of the year. [more]

Accused diplomat to return to NZ
The Malaysian diplomat accused of a sex crime in Wellington is being returned to New Zealand, in a move welcomed by Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully. [more]

Criticism of family violence package
The Law Society says a proposal in the family violence package announced by the Government is a direct attack on one of the pillars of the justice system. [more]

Federer into Wimbledon semi-finals
Seven-time Wimbledon tennis champion Roger Federer avoided joining the grand slam's growing list of Centre Court casualties as the Swiss star hit back to reach the semi-finals with a 3-6... [more]

Doping scandal hits Aussie Tour de France team
A doping scandal has rocked the Australian cycling team Orica-GreenEDGE three days before the Tour de France. Their South African team member Daryl Impey, who made history last year as... [more]

Flood risks hamper Avon River project
The Government's $100 million project to regenerate Christchurch's Avon River is being scaled back because of fears it might exacerbate the city's flooding problems. [more]

Car driver injured in train collision
A driver has been injured when his car and a train collided at a West Coast rail crossing, leaving the vehicle extensively damaged. [more]

Vanuatu wants West Papua at UN level
The Vanuatu Prime Minister Joe Natuman says the government is still looking at pushing the West Papua issue at the United Nations level. [more]

Ngapuhi suspicious of council plans
Ngapuhi Runanga has admitted it is suspicious of Northland Regional Council's plans for Maori representation saying they are too narrow and could set tribe against tribe. [more]

Cunliffe's apology not enough - lawyer
Labour Leader David Cunliffe's hints of an apology to Maori over the Foreshore and Seabed Act do not go far enough, a former Treaty of Waitangi lawyer says. [more]

Tribunal reveals inquiry plans
The Waitangi Tribunal has revealed it will be holding inquiries into matters of national significance, starting with the rights of Maori war veterans. Also in its sights is health. [more]

Harawira waiting to hear from police
Police are yet to contact Hone Harawira over shots being fired at the party's Kaitaia office - and the Mana Party leader isn't happy about it, saying he's worried about staff safety. [more]

Vanuatu MPs accused of interference
The new chairman of the Vanuatu Citizenship Commission says he's recently been approached by two MPs who wanted foreign nationals to be granted citizenship. [more]

Dairy farmer confidence falls
Falling dairy commodity prices and higher interest rates have hit farmer optimism for six, the latest rural confidence survey shows. Just a quarter are feeling positive. [more]

Greens want landfarm inquiry widened
The Green Party is welcoming an inquiry into so-called Taranaki landfarms, where oil industry waste is disposed of, but believes it should include other farms. [more]

Goodman Fielder offer lowered
The bidders for Goldman Fielder appear to have uncovered something not to its liking in the company's books, prompting it to lower its offer, an analyst says. [more]

Ebos model could be exported
Ebos' 10-year contract to provide the warehousing and distribution of medical and non-medical products to all public hospitals is likely to be exported to Australia, its boss says. [more]

Rabobank expecting merry Christmas
Rabobank expects dairy prices to recover by Christmas. The prediction follows a drop in milk prices in the GlobalDairyTrade auction to the lowest level since January last year. [more]

Gas leak forces hotel evacuation
More than 90 people had to be evacuated from a large Nelson hotel when what appeared to be smoke filled the gym and bar. Fire crews discovered refrigeration gas had leaked. [more]

Labour plan to end parental donations
The Labour Party will pay schools to stop asking parents for donations if it leads the government after September's election in a policy it said will cost $50 million a year to implement. [more]

CNMI tourism industry showing promise
The CNMI economy continues to recover thanks to growth in the tourism industry. [more]

Sentencing in Kali Fungavaka case adjourned
The sentencing of those convicted of manslaughter of Kali Fungavaka has been adjourned. [more]

Samoa's Faapo opposes amendments
The Tautua Samoa opposition party says the Prime Minister is seeking to become the future head of state under proposed constitutional amendments. [more]

Bluff running low on water
Repairs to the pipeline supplying water to Bluff are underway, with one day's supply remaining in the town's reservoir. [more]

Woodward to feature for Wellington
The former Wellington fullback Jason Woodward has confirmed he's returning to the Lions for the 2014 domestic rugby season. The Wellington-born 24-year-old, who's currently playing for the Melbourne Rebels, recently... [more]

CORRESPONDENT - Stephen Hewson
Just when the Black Caps should have been basking in well deserved recognition for their series win over the West Indies, along comes "My name is Lou Vincent and I am a cheat". [more]

Cocaine jury's deliberations delayed
A jury deciding the case of a man accused of organising a cocaine importation that cost his mother-in-law's life are likely to begin their deliberations on Friday. [more]

Counties open Ranfurly Shield defence with big win
Counties-Manukau have survived their first Ranfurly Shield challenge of 2014, thumping Heartland team Thames Valley 68-0 in Pukekohe. The hosts ran in 10 tries in the pre-ITM Cup hitout and... [more]

Neymar happy with ugly football
Neymar insists that he is happy for Brazil to win ugly as long as it gets them past Colombia in Saturday's football World Cup quarter-final in Fortaleza. The occasional moment... [more]

Charles Piutau back for Blues
The All Black Charles Piutau will make a timely return from injury to start on the left wing for the Blues as they try to keep their Super Rugby playoff hopes alive against the Crusaders. [more]

Nets hire Hollins as head coach
The Brooklyn Nets NBA basketball franchise have hired Lionel Hollins as their new head coach. Hollins, a former coach of the Memphis Grizzlies, takes over for Jason Kidd, who joined... [more]

Williamson's action undergoes remedial work
The New Zealand cricketer Kane Williamson has been undergoing remedial work on his bowling action before he's officially tested for an illegal action. Williamson was reported by the umpires for... [more]

Cairns still waiting
The former New Zealand cricket international Chris Cairns will have to wait until September to learn whether he'll be prosecuted over match-fixing allegations, according to London's Telegraph newspaper. [more]

Fernandes sells Caterham team
The Malaysian aviation entrepreneur Tony Fernandes has ended an unhappy Formula One adventure by selling his struggling Caterham team to a group of Swiss and Middle Eastern investors with former... [more]

FIFA investigate fixing claims
FIFA have asked the German magazine Der Spiegel to hand over all the documents it says it has regarding the claims of convicted match-fixer Wilson Raj Perumal that Cameroon players... [more]

High Court judge names official
A judge has released his reasons for lifting name suppression earlier granted to a Malaysian diplomat accused of burglary and a sex charge against a Wellington woman. [more]

All Black quartet return for Crusaders
The Crusaders have rushed All Blacks Dan Carter, Kieran Read, Owen Franks and Israel Dagg back into the starting XV for Saturday's Super Rugby match against the Blues. [more]

Vincent could still have future in cricket
New Zealand's representative on the ICC, Martin Snedden, believes Lou Vincent could have a role educating young cricketers about fixing in the future. [more]

Auckland house prices edge higher
Auckland's largest real estate agency says sales slowed in June but average prices continued to edge higher as it sold more homes worth more than $1 million. [more]

Building firm supports Filipino workers
Large building firm Buildtech, who made five migrant workers redundant in Christchurch recently, says the staff are being supported financially and socially. [more]

Plan for new wool levy
The plan to resurrect a wool levy has been officially launched. Sheep farmers will have the chance to vote for the proposal in a referendum in October. [more]

June was the warmest since 1909
Last month was the warmest June since 1909, when records began. The average temperature for the country of 10.3 °C surpassed the previous record in 2003. [more]

PNG police chiefs to re-look at PM file
Papua New Guinea's Police Chief of Operations, Jim Andrews, says it is imperative that police re-look at the investigation into the Prime Minister's alleged role in illegal payments to the Paraka law firm. [more]

Jakarta/West Papua talks urged
A Melanesian Spearhead Group leader says it is hoped that the organisation can help West Papuans forge agreement on their future through dialogue with Indonesia. [more]

UN concern at Kiribati crowding
The United Nations Population Fund, or UNFPA, has been in talks with the Kiribati government this week about ways to curb what it calls concerning population growth. [more]

Lightning hits five homes in Auckland
A lightning strike set one south Auckland homeowner's bed alight and sent shockwaves through another's house on the same street. [more]

Trial delay for fire death accused
The trial of the two men accused of setting a man on fire and murdering him has been adjourned. [more]

Samoan allegedly stole from school bands
A Samoan man, operating a travel agency in the U.S. state of Utah, has been accused of stealing more than half a million dollars from two high school marching bands. [more]

"Carrots" needed to retain Cook Island workers
A Cook Islands trade union says the next government needs to provide better incentives if it wants to keep the country's working population. [more]

Australia's new Pacific patrol boats will help monitor fishing
Australian senator Richard Colbeck says Canberra's recently announced update of its Pacific patrol boats programme will help the monitoring of fisheries in the region. [more]

Samoa fish factory could hurt neighbouring plants
A fish processor in American Samoa says an additional fish plant setting up in Samoa has the potential to impact on the company's competitive position. [more]

Sport: Korea men's cricket team to tour Fiji
The Korean men's cricket team will tour Fiji next week as part of their preparations for the 2014 Asian Games. [more]

Sport: Pacific Games Council in PNG to check progress for 2015
Officials are in Port Moresby this week to assess progress one year out from next year's 2015 Pacific Games. [more]

Streaker fined $500 for Test dash
A man who streaked at a packed rugby Test between the All Blacks and England in Dunedin last month was fined $500 when he appeared in the Christchurch District Court. [more]

Desert Road reopens after snow
The Desert Road in the central North Island has reopened after snow closed it on Thursday morning. [more]

Families turn in women over robbery
Kaitaia police have arrested two women over the knifepoint robbery of a local bakery. The families of the young women took them to the police after seeing footage of the incident. [more]

Poverty group wants smaller classes
The Child Poverty Action Group is calling for smaller classes in low-decile schools and higher pay for their teachers. [more]

Hopes development will curb Cooks population loss
The Cook Islands Party's Mark Brown says improved infrastructure in the outer islands will help stop the population drain. [more]

Progress against violence in Kiribati - UNFPA
The United Nations Population Fund says it's pleased with progress being made to combat gender-based violence in Kiribati but says more work still needs to be done. [more]

Science scholarships for Samoan teachers
The University of the South Pacific says it hopes more Samoan students will be encouraged to study science as it upgrades the qualifications of teachers with a new programme. [more]

Surveillance technology no panacea for illegal Pacific fishing
A manager in New Zealand's Ministry of Primary Industries says new surveillance technology is not the best way to stop illegal fishing. [more]

American Samoa investigates geothermal power
The American Samoa Power Authority has completed the first phase of a project to explore the potential for geothermal power. [more]

Security bolstered amid bomb concerns
New Zealand could be one of the first countries to experience heightened security for direct flights into the United States, an aviation analyst says. [more]

Dollar up against most currencies
The New Zealand dollar is higher against the currencies of the country's major trading partners, particularly against the Australian, finishing the day at 93.43 Australian cents. [more]

Maori language strategy approved
The Government has approved a new Maori language strategy. It will create a body called Te Matawai, which will oversee the Maori Language Commission and Te Mangai Paho. [more]

Kiribati calls key climate meet
Kiribati will meet with fellow atoll nations next week to to develop a united stance in the face of climate change. [more]

83 percent of Tongans on electoral roll
The supervisor of elections in Tonga says there are 48,000 voters included on the provisional roll, which is an increase of six thousand people since the last general election in 2010. [more]

Economist tells region to bargain with China
An economist specialising in China says Pacific Island countries should use their leverage when doing deals with companies from resource-hungry China. [more]

Algae makes American Samoa's Pago Pago harbour a no go
American Samoa's Marine Department says people should avoid swimming and fishing in Pago Pago harbour until the cause of the water's strange colouring is identified. [more]

Kiribati group claims official wrong on squatting claim
Kiribati's Office of the People's Lawyer says it stands by its report that an estimated 300 people were arrested by police on Kiritimati island, reportedly for squatting on government land. [more]

Excavations underway at Port Sandwich in Vanuatu
An archaeologist in Vanuatu examining a site once made famous by Captain Cook says his research reveals the dramatic and long-lasting effects of early European contact. [more]

Man facing 3 year old rape charge in American Samoa
A man in American Samoa who allegedly raped a woman over three years ago has only now been charged with the crime and faces a bail set at 100,000 US dollars. [more]

Brando luxury resort open in French Polynesia
A luxury eco-resort has been opened on a remote island in the Tetiaroa islets in French Polynesia, owned by the estate of American actor Marlon Brando. [more]

No changes to winning Highlanders
The Highlanders have named an unchanged team to face the current Super Rugby leaders the New South Wales Waratahs in Sydney on Sunday afternoon. With last weekend's 29-25 win against... [more]

Match-winning, try-scoring lock inks new Hurricanes deal
The rising lock Blade Thomson has signed on with the Hurricanes for a further two Super Rugby seasons, following a standout, two-try performance in his team's 16-9 victory over the... [more]

Black Caps move up ICC Player Rankings after series victory
New Zealand bowlers have moved up the ICC Player Rankings for Test bowlers after their historic series' win against the West Indies in Bridgetown. The Black Caps won the third... [more]

Call for change to Wimbledon schedule
Wimbledon's schedule needs changing so players don't have to endure five-set matches on successive days, says top seed Novak Djokovic. [more]

Timaru woman's body found on beach
Police have confirmed the body of a woman found on a Timaru beach on Thursday morning is that of a missing local woman who had impaired sight and hearing. [more]

Health boss would've supported detaining woman
The head of Mental Health Services in Waikato says he would have supported staff going outside the letter of the law to restrain a patient who escaped and then killed a woman. [more]

Still no sign of missing hunter
Police have found no sign to a hunter missing on the West Coast, south of Hokitika, who was last seen more than a week ago. Corey Stephens was expected to return last Friday. [more]

Five suspended at Taranaki institute
Five staff members at a Taranaki tertiary institute have been suspended pending the outcome of an investigation into its National Certificate in Maori Performing Arts course. [more]

Bill extending supervision orders passes first hurdle
Legislation that would extend supervision orders for child sex offenders for more than 10 years has passed its first reading in Parliament. [more]

Christchurch storm more costly for insurers
The storm that hit Canterbury in February has cost insurers $1.5 million more than their earlier estimate and payouts tally $4.8 million so far. [more]

Pledge to protect heritage buildings
Labour is promising to keep the wrecking ball away from remaining heritage buildings in quake-hit Christchurch if elected, but MP Jacinda Ardern says that won't hinder the rebuild. [more]

NCEA figures edge toward Govt target
New figures show the proportion of 18-year-olds with at least level two of the NCEA is continuing to rise, though the rate of improvement has slowed. [more]

PM stands by McCully over diplomat
The Prime Minister is continuing to support Murray McCully as the Opposition calls for his resignation as Foreign Affairs Minister over the Malaysian diplomat fiasco. [more]

Life for 'execution-style' murder
The mother of a murdered Auckland woman confronted her daughter's killer on Thursday, telling him she wishes she'd never let him into their home. He must serve at least 17 years. [more]

Police seek help over missing teen
Police in Christchurch are seeking information about a missing teenager they believe is in the central city area. [more]

King's son discharged without conviction
A spokesperson for Maori King Tuheitia's son - who has been discharged without conviction on four charges - says the judge's decision recognises the uniqueness of the Maori King movement. [more]

Quality standards for lakes and rivers
National water quality standards are being introduced for rivers and lakes for the first time. The Environment Minister says they will greatly improve the way freshwater is managed. [more]

DHB: crackdown won't affect care
The Southern district health board says a spending crackdown after a budget blowout of nearly $14 million won't compromise patient care or reduce its services. [more]

CTV building engineer may face action
Action may be taken against one of the engineers who led the design of the CTV building that collapsed in the Canterbury earthquakes in February 2011, killing 115 people. [more]

Ex-officer jailed for indecent assaults
Former officer Adam Dunnett has been jailed 22 months for indecently assaulting young women, who say they have lost trust in police. A request for home detention was denied. [more]