Radio New Zealand - Sunday, 13th July 2014

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Birds, Business News, Dateline Pacific, Morning Report, New Horizons, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nine To Noon, One In Five, Rural News, Sounds Historical, Spectrum, Spiritual Outlook, Standing Room Only, Te Ahi Kaa, Te Manu Korihi, TED Radio Hour, The Critic's Chair, World & Pacific News

Birds

Grey-tailed tattler
Listen to the grey-tailed tattler. [more]

Business News

Milk prices may not recover till China's retail price falls
An executive at the Danish dairy company, Arla Foods, says global milk prices may not begin to recover until the retail price of milk in China declines. [more]

Australia's high unemployment is testing economic assumptions
Across the Tasman, and a spike in Australian unemployment is testing assumptions of a rebalancing of the economy away from mining. [more]

Equity markets focus on company earnings
An analyst says a note of caution crept into global stock markets last week, partly inspired by banking issues in Portugal. Britain's Foot-sie fell a whopping 2.6 percent but the S&P 500 Index in the U.S. fell almost 1 percent. New Zelaand's Top 50 Index shed 1.7 percent. [more]

Markets Update for 14 July 2014
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Dateline Pacific

NZ-based artist awarded Samoa residency
A New Zealand-based Samoan artist known for her performance art and recreation of historical scenes has been awarded an artist's residency in Samoa. [more]

Coral gardening tourism in Vanuatu
A new eco-tourism venture aimed at reversing the effects of climate change on coral reefs has been launched in Vanuatu. [more]

Geothermal energy potential power source for Pacific
An Australian geothermal company plans to use volcanic energy to replace imported diesel fuel in the Pacific. [more]

PNG mine proceeding without public consent - campaigners
A campaign group says the Papua New Guinea government is going ahead with an experimental new seabed mine without the consent of the people. [more]

Aussie Government criticised for locking children in centres
The Australian Government has been criticised for its policy of detaining women and children in offshore detention centres with substandard medical care. [more]

Dateline morning edition for 14 July 2014
Australian Government underfire for detaining children in detention; Campaigners says a PNG mine is proceeding without public consent; We hear about the potential of volcanic energy in the Pacific; A coral gardening eco-tourism venture is launched in Vanuatu; A New Zealand-based artist is awarded a artist's residency in Samoa. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Monday 14 July 2014
Family mourns dead mother of one, Havoc in Northland, Clean up underway in Northland, Football World Cup final kicks off in Brazil, Our reporter among German and Argentinian fans, Israel ignores ceasefire appeals, widens range of bombing, Collins denies police were under pressure to minimize figures, Green Party says National's planned water standards too low and Minister Joyce rebukes Green party's new environmental policy. [more]

Sports News for 14 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport [more]

Pacific News for 14 July 2014
The latest from the Pacific region. [more]

Germany confident of a World Cup win
The final of the Football World Cup gets underway in less than an hour, and Germany are the favourites to defeat Argentina for the trophy. [more]

Argentina fans excited by World Cup prospect
Argentina last won the World Cup in 1986, when they beat West Germany 3-2 in Mexico, but heading into today's match, Germany are the favourites to take out the title. [more]

Football World Cup kicks off shortly
The Football World Cup final is set to get underway in Rio de Janeiro shortly, with Argentina and Germany battling it out to see who will be the World Champions. For the latest here is CNN's Amanda Davies and Alex Thomas. [more]

Economists expect a higher inflation rate than the Reserve Bank
Economists on average are expecting a 0.4 percent increase in the Consumers Price Index for the June quarter, taking the annual rate to 1.8 percent. [more]

Sports News for 14 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Family mourns dead mother of one
The family of a woman swept to her death in a flooded river in the Bay of Islands are mourning the loss of a devoted mother and sister. [more]

Havoc in Northland
People in Northland are dealing with the aftermath after a weekend of wild weather caused floods, power cuts and road closures. [more]

Clean up underway in Northland
Still with the weather clean-up in Northland and joining us is the Far North's Civil Defence Controller is Alistair Wells. [more]

Argentina deputy ambassador excited for final
Yes, it's underway, the final of the World Cup between Argentina and Germany in Brazil. The Deputy Argentinian Ambassador, Romina Bocache, is watching the match at The Grand Bar in Wellington. [more]

German ambassador watches football final
Also among the fans in the capital is the German Ambassador, Anne-Marie Schleich who's just as excited for her country. [more]

Football World Cup final kicks off in Brazil
Joining me in the studio is former All White and our football commentator for the tournament, Sam Malcolmson. [more]

Our reporter among German and Argentinian fans
Our Wellington reporter, Jonathan Mitchell, is among fans at The Grand bar on Courtenay Place. [more]

Israel ignores ceasefire appeals, widens range of bombing
Hundreds of Palestinians have been fleeing the northern parts of Gaza, after Israel warned it was targeting the area in the latest phase of its campaign. [more]

Collins denies police were under pressure to minimize figures
The former Police Minister, Judith Collins, is denying police were put under political pressure to minimise burglary figures. [more]

Green Party says National's planned water standards too low
The Green Party says quality standards National wants for lakes and rivers could leave New Zealanders with a one in 20 chance of catching a vomiting bug or diarrhoea just by touching the water. [more]

Minister Joyce rebukes Green party's new environmental policy
We asked Labour's environment spokesperson, Moana Mackey, to come on and talk about their party's response given the potential collation between Labour and the Greens after the election. [more]

World Cup final underway in Brazil
It's just gone half time at the Football World Cup final in Brazil and Martin Lipton is at Maracana Stadium and joins us now. [more]

Sports News for 14 July 2014
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Clean up time in Northland
It's cleanup time up north as the wild weather which brought power cuts, flooding and road closures, finally looks to be moving off shore. [more]

Act will contest this year's election with a different line up
The Act Party will contest this year's election with a totally different line up from 2011. [more]

ACT leader Jamie Whyte
To the ACT List with us is ACT leader Jamie Whyte. [more]

Te Anau sewage to land proposal
Te Anau residents are kicking up a stink about a Southland District Council plan to pump the town's sewage nearly 20 kilometers out of town and spread it on farmland. [more]

Deadlock in the world cup
The former All White and our football commentator for the tournament, Sam Malcolmson, is in the studio. [more]

Our reporter among German and Argentinian fans
Our Wellington reporter, Jonathan Mitchell, is among fans at The Grand bar on Courtenay Place. [more]

Disputed Afghan election to be recounted in full
The American Secretary of State John Kerry has convinced Afghanistan's feuding presidential candidates to agree to a total recount of last month's presidential election. [more]

Maori Party aims to win seven seats by focussing on whanau
Despite facing an uphill battle, the Maori Party is aiming to win all seven Maori seats in the September election. [more]

Largest pest-control programme to protect birds
New Zealand's largest-ever pest control operation has been given the go ahead. [more]

Phil Kafcaloudes with news from Australia
Time to chat to our Melbourne correspondent Phil Kafcaloudes. [more]

Football World Cup final goes to extra time
The Football World Cup final is headed for extra time, with the scores locked at nil -all. The chief football writer for Britain's Daily Mirror newspaper, Martin Lipton, is at Maracana Stadium and joins us now. [more]

New Horizons

New Horizons - 13 July 2014
William Dart dares to revisit British progressive rock, with two new box sets: early-years Virgin recordings and a 12-CD set of recordings of Yes. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Samoan for 14 July 2014
The latest news in Samoan language. [more]

News in Samoan for 14 July 2014
The latest news in Samoan language. [more]

News in Tongan for 14 July 2014
The latest news in Tongan language. [more]

News in French for 14 July 2014
The latest news in French language. [more]

Nine To Noon

Off the Beaten Track with Kennedy Warne
On the battle for our native birds. [more]

Final of the football world cup
Correspondent Andrew Downie joins us from Brazil. [more]

Are e-cigarettes a health innovation or a risk?
University of Auckland population health associate professor Chris Bullen and co-director, NZ Tobacco Control Research Turanga; and Pamela Ling, Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. Her research is on tobacco prevention among young people, and the marketing and advertising of e-cigarettes. [more]

Otago University's bid to harness student volunteers
Sze-En Lau is the Coordinator of the University of Otago Volunteer Centre. [more]

Final moments in the football final
Former All White and RNZ's football commentator for the tournament Sam Malcolmson joins us in the last minutes of the football world cup. [more]

Middle East correspondent Irris Makler
Israeli warns of large-scale bombing of Gaza. [more]

Shirley-Anne Thomson on 70 years in highland dancing
Shirley-Anne Thomson, aged 79, has an incredible almost 70-year history of highland dancing in New Zealand, including performing for royalty, in prisons, and in countries all over the world. She is part of the New Zealand contingent traveling to Edinburgh to participate in the famous Military Tattoo at Edinburgh Castle. The 36 highland dancers taking part are performing in combination with a kapa haka group - the first time at the Tattoo that kapa haka and highland dancers have taken to the stage at the same time. Shirley-Anne is the choreographer of the highland dance component. The group will be performancing in front of a live audience of 220,000 over 25 shows during the month of August. Up to 300,000,000 more people will watch the spectacle on BBC television around the world. This year's Tattoo boasts the largest ever massed pipes and drums group at the event, with a cast of more than 1000 people. [more]

Book review: How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran
Reviewed by Louise O'Brien, published by Ebury Press, RRP$37.99 [more]

Political commentators Matthew Hooton and Mike Williams
The fall out from the Malaysian diplomat scandal, and how some of the smaller parties are gearing up for the election. [more]

Food with Roman Jewell of Fix and Fogg Peanut Butter
Fix and Fogg Peanut Butter: Commercial lawyer turned artisan peanut butter maker Roman Jewell shares recipes for Fudge Fingers and Winter Peanut Butter Coleslaw. www.fixandfogg.co.nz [more]

One In Five

One In Five for 13 July 2014
Even a mild brain injury can have a huge impact on a person's life. Following an accident, medical staff often focus on the injuries they can see and sometimes brain injuries are missed. One in Five speaks to a neuropsychologist about the symptoms of brain injuries, how head injuries are diagnosed and the path to recovery. One in Five also meets an extreme athlete who has had to re-assess haw far he will push himself following a severe traumatic brain injury. {topics] Disability [more]

Rural News

Morning Rural News for 14 July 2014
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Sounds Historical

Sounds Historical Hour One - 13 July 2014
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan, the programme that gives listeners the chance to learn about New Zealand's colourful past. [more]

Sounds Historical Hour One - 13 July 2014
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan, the programme that gives listeners the chance to learn about New Zealand's colourfup past. [more]

Sounds Historical Hour Two - 13 July 2014
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan, the programme that gives listeners the chance to learn about New Zealand's colourful past [more]

Spectrum

Spectrum Sunday 13 July
A group of Kaimanawa horses, which once roamed wild over the Central Plateau, are proving how adaptable they can be by learning to bow, use a seesaw and perform to music. With these skills, Robin Sisley's nine Kaimanawa horses are now contributing to their upkeep by performing for small shows at her Waikato property. For Spectrum, Lisa Thompson finds out how Robin has turned her horses from wild to workable. [more]

Spiritual Outlook

Spiritual Outlook for 13 July 2014
Work and Worship - Exploring religious diversity in New Zealand workplaces. [more]

Standing Room Only

Peter Larsen's Albert Black
New play Albert Black takes us back to a time when teenagers were considered less than heavenly creatures. Bodgies and Widgies ruled 50's New Zealand milk bars as parents trembled and one judge condemned the scene as "a wasteland of warring juveniles, delinquents, teenage sex, no parental supervision, all-night dives, blaring jukeboxes". It all sounds like a great time to be young! [more]

Beatnik Publishing Turns Seven
Boutique book publisher Sally Greer has turned a part-time passion into a fulltime career. Her company, Beatnik Publishing, began seven years ago in Auckland and has managed to survive as other, bigger publishers have gone under or withdrawn from the New Zealand market. Sally isn't fazed, though. She says she's never known a good time to be in the book business. [more]

Red Bull Flying Bach
The music of Bach was made for breakdancing. So says musician and opera director Christoph Hagel who has joined with German B-boy crew Flying Steps to merge the 80's American dance form with Johann Sebastian's 17th century work, The Well-Tempered Clavier. Aucklanders will be able to make their own minds up when their show, Red Bull Flying Bach, hits town later in the year. Christoph says it was natural for him to bring the two together. [more]

New Zealand Converges on Edinburgh
This year New Zealand will be taking its largest contingent to Edinburgh to-date. Around 200 artists from New Zealand will converge upon Scotland's capital city to perform in an array of festivals which include; Edinburgh Fringe, The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival, plus there's also the prestigious Edinburgh International Book Festival in which Witi Ihimaera will be attending, and for the visual arts -The Edinburgh Art Festival. Those who have been to Edinburgh during festival season describe the atmosphere as 'electric.' There is a lot on offer for audiences who travel there in search of world-class entertainment, theatre and music, plus there's the addition of festival buyers from around the globe who are on the hunt to book those hot ticket shows that will bring audiences in their hometowns to their venues. [more]

Stages of Change
Thirteen Solomon Island women and one Wellington theatre director are breaking down taboos around domestic violence and the place of women. Called Stages of Change, they're led by Fijian-New Zealander Nina Nawalowalo and have taken their performance to the Fifth Melanesian Arts Festival in Papua New Guinea. Justin Gregory asked Nina just how taboo the subject of violence really is. [more]

Books - Autobiography of a Marguerite
Poet Zarah Butcher-McGunnigle's new book length poem is an account of someone suffering from a serious auto-immune illness. Or is it? Called Autobiography of a Marguerite the poem wrestles with ideas of identity, ambiguity and the absurdity of a sickness in which the body attacks itself. [more]

Art conservation
Say conservation in New Zealand and most of us start thinking about heading outdoors. But for Italian-born Carolina Izzo art conservation is definitely an indoor pursuit. After she finished training she ran her own business based in Naples through the 80s and 90s, working on collections belonging to the Italian State and other national and international institutions. After moving here in 2001 with her Kiwi husband, she worked at Te Papa and more recently opened a private studio in central Wellington. Jerome Cvitanovich asked her how she understood the term conservator. [more]

Te Ahi Kaa

Whaikōrero - Eruera Tirikatene
Poroporoaki to Sir Eruera Tirikatene by Koro Wetere in 1967. [more]

The Ōtakou Māori Memorial Methodist Church
Rachel Wesley shows Justine Murray around the church located a few metres away from Otakou Marae and is home to a whanau Whare Taoka, a small room with a range of photos, treasures and pounamu. [more]

Whakatāuki mo 13 o Hōngongoi (July) 2014
Ko te pipi te tuatahi, ko te kaunuku te tuarua. A small wedge is used first, followed by a larger one. [more]

Louise Potiki Bryant
Ngai Tahu choreographer Louise Potiki Bryant talks about her career in dance which includes a range of productions with The Black Grace Dance Company, Atamira and Te Ahukaramu Charles Royal's Te Whare Tapere. Louise also talks about new projects in the works as a result of being awarded the Caroline Plummer Fellowship earlier this year. [more]

Te Manu Korihi

Te Manu Korihi News for 14 July 2014
The United Nations is denying an accusation its president is delaying preparations to hold its first global indigenous conference; The Hokotehi Moriori Trust is opposing an application from the company, Chatham Rock Phosphate, to mine the seabed near Rekohu - the Chatham Islands; A political scientist is predicting the Maori Party is most likely to have its female co-leader outside of Parliament; The asthma foundation hopes to include an asthma regimen, proved to be beneficial for Maori, in new asthma treatment guidelines. [more]

Te Manu Korihi News for 14 July 2014
The United Nations is denying an accusation its president is delaying preparations to hold its first global indigenous conference; A political scientist is predicting the Maori Party is most likely to have its female co-leader outside of Parliament; The Hokotehi Moriori Trust is opposing an application from the company, Chatham Rock Phosphate, to mine the seabed near Rekohu - the Chatham Islands; The asthma foundation hopes to include an asthma regimen, proved to be beneficial for Maori, in new asthma treatment guidelines. [more]

TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour: Framing the Story
Four TED speakers explore the art of storytelling - and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world. Featuring the TED Talks 1. Andrew Stanton: What Makes A Good Story? Filmmaker Andrew Stanton explains how the strongest storytelling is joke telling. 2. Tracy Chevalier: How Do You Find A Story In A Painting? When writer Tracy Chevalier looks at paintings, she imagines the stories behind them: How did the painter meet his model? What would explain that look in her eye? She shares the story of Vermeer's most famous painting that inspired her best-selling novel "Girl With a Pearl Earring." 3. Chip Kidd: How Do Book Covers Tell Their Own Stories? Chip Kidd doesn't judge a book by its cover; he creates covers that embody the books - and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. Kidd showcases the art and deep thought of his cover designs. 4. Chimamanda Adichie: What Are The Dangers Of A Single Story? Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice - and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. 5. Andrew Stanton: What Are The Clues To A Good Story? Filmmaker Andrew Stanton shares what he knows about storytelling - starting at the end and working back to the beginning. Earlier this episode, Stanton shared a story that does exactly that. [more]

The Critic's Chair

The Critics Chair - 13 July 2014
William Dart reviews a number of local releases in this programme. The Auckland Philharmonia play works by Ross Harris; and Jaz Coleman's Symphony No 2 The Island. The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra have a new recording of overtures and entr'actes by Meyerbeer; and Gillian Bibby is the editor of Living Echoes: The First 150 Years of Piano Music from New Zealand - a collection of beginner piano music published by The Sunrise Music Trust. [more]

World & Pacific News

5am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest Pacific regional and sports news. [more]

6am World, Pacific and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

7am World, Pacific and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 14 July 2014
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

News stories:

Rudisha equals world-leading time
The Olympic champion David Rudisha equalled the best time in the world this year as he won the 800 metres at the Glasgow Diamond League meeting. Rudisha, who is still... [more]

River plays important part of memorial
A Ngai Tahu leader says it is fitting the Avon River plays an important part in the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial site to be built between Montreal Street and Rhododendron Island. [more]

Pacific health problems worsening
Poor governance, growing populations and poor conditions are resulting in severe health problems in the Pacific, with some hospitals on the brink of collapse. [more]

What cost the Commonwealth Games?
Glasgow is preparing to host the 20th instalment of the Commonwealth Games. Insight looks at the viability of the event, given rising costs and a competitive sporting landscape. [more]

Snow warning for South Island
A snowfall warning is in place for all the alpine passes in the South Island. [more]

Non-dairy milk not aimed at NZ
A company developing a non-dairy form of milk said it is motivated by animal welfare and environmental concerns, and is not targeting the New Zealand dairy industry. [more]

Royal visit a $68m advert for tourism
The publicity generated during the Royal Tour by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge equalled $68 million worth of advertising for the country, Tourism New Zealand reports. [more]

Red zone residents want first refusal
People who have moved off red-zoned beach areas north of Christchurch are pushing the Government to give them the first right of refusal to buy back their properties. [more]

Unitec accused of failing to consult
Tertiary educator Unitec in Auckland is being accused of failing to inform residents about its plans to develop its campus. [more]

Public early childhood education touted
The Labour Party is considering setting up a system of public early childhood education centres, if it leads the next government, although it has not yet costed the idea. [more]

Greens will establish a rivers network
The Green Party will set up a protected rivers network to permanently safeguard New Zealand's rivers and will limit the amount of water taken from them, the party has announced. [more]

NZ First announces rail plan
New Zealand First is proposing to develop Railways of National Importance as part of its transport policy. The Gisborne to Napier line would be one of the first projects. [more]

ACT Party announces its list
The ACT Party has announced its list for the upcoming election, and says it's a blend of young talent and experienced leaders. First on the list is party leader Jamie Whyte. [more]

Pest control programme gets go-ahead
What Conservation Minister Nick Smith is calling the largest ever pest-control programme in New Zealand has been given the go ahead to protect native birds. [more]

Northland farmers' plea for feed
Farmers in some parts of Northland, particularly Hikurangi and Ruawai, are pleading for spare feed after a week of stormy weather that's left their land completely underwater. [more]