Radio New Zealand - Sunday, 12th July 2015

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Business News, Dateline Pacific, In Parliament, Morning Report, New Horizons, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nine To Noon, One In Five, Rural News, Sounds Historical, Spectrum, Spiritual Outlook, Standing Room Only, Te Ahi Kaa, Te Manu Korihi, War Reports, World & Pacific News, You Call This Art?

Business News

Inflation remains in check
Economists say rising fuel prices are likely to have pushed up the cost of living in recent months, but inflation remains firmly in check. [more]

IP expert says NZ is losing billions each year
An expert in intellectual property law says New Zealand's creative industries are potentially losing billions of dollars a year because the laws aren't tight enough. [more]

Crowd funding no competition for angel investors
A government angel investment firm says crowd funding is not proving to be competition for its more traditional sources of investment. [more]

Massey students and academics building regional business
Massey University's commercial arm is offering up affordable business research to local companies who want to know more about doing business better. [more]

Jim Parker in Australia
To Australia now and the rout in China's stock market has cast a fresh shadow over Australia's heavyweight mining sector. [more]

Morning markets for 13 July 2015
On Wall Street, stocks rose as investors hoped the latest bailout proposal from Greece would lead to breakthrough with creditors. [more]

Markets Update for 13 July 2015
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Dateline Pacific

Acclaimed Pacific poet gets Fulbright scholarship
A Pacific poet Karlo Mila has been awarded a writing residency in Hawai'i. [more]

Vanuatu community tells story of attack at birth of independence
A New Zealand sociolinguist has helped a Vanuatu village in Hog Harbour, Santo, tell the story of the traumatic attack on their community during a flashpoint shortly after the country gained independence in 1980. [more]

Media to help Vanuatu curb NCD epidemic
Health authorities and the media in Vanuatu are joining forces to try to curb the growth in so-called lifestyle diseases. [more]

Better boats sought for Bougainville's outer islands
The people on the increasingly difficult to live on Carteret Islands in Bougainville, are often short of food, but an NGO has a solution. [more]

Media decree amendment positive step, but challenges remain
An amendment to the Media Industry Development Decree in Fiji means individual journalists can no longer be fined for breaches, and is being seen as a positive step forward by the government, but challenges remain. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 13 July 2015
Amendments to Media Industry Development Decree in Fiji seen as a positive step foward by the government; An NGO in the autonomous Papua New Guinea region of Bougainville wants better services provided to the Carterets; Health authorities and the media in Vanuatu are joining forces to combat Non Commincable Diseases; A sociolinguist helps villagers in Vanuatu tell the story of a traumatic attack in 1980 shortly after independence; And a Pacific poet receives the 2015 Fulbright-Creative New Zealand Pacific Writer's Residency. [more]

In Parliament

The Week In Parliament for 12 July 2015
The new Clerk of the House, David Wilson, talks about his dream job; David Carter tables report on this year's Speaker's Tour, slammed by media as the mother of all junkets and a global knees-up. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Monday 13 July 2015
Labour cops flak over Chinese surname property claim, Unions hit out at changes to zero hours contracts, Fiji qualify for Olympics after New Zealand expelled, and Beneficiary advocates accuse Work and Income of bending rules to slash benefits. [more]

Sports News for 13 July 2015
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Council of Trade Unions is calling zero hour contracts a sham
The Council of Trade Unions is calling the government's proposed changes to zero hour contracts a sham. [more]

Pacific News for 13 July 2015
The latest from the Pacific region. [more]

David Seymour on Labour's Chinese claims
The ACT Party leader and MP for Epsom in Auckland, David Seymour, says he's not surprised by the real estate information released at the weekend by the Labour Party - but he objects to the way it's being used. [more]

Beneficiary advocates accuse Work and Income of bending rules
Beneficiary advocates are accusing Work and Income of failing to follow its own protocols, in order to slash benefit payments. [more]

Sports News for 13 July 2015
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Labour cops flak over Chinese surname property claim
The Labour Party's highlighting of the Chinese sounding surnames of Auckland house buyers has been criticised as crude and inflammatory by both the Government and other opposition political parties. [more]

Unions hit out at changes to zero hours contracts
Unions are criticising the government's proposed changes to zero hour contracts, saying they codify what should have been banned in the first place. [more]

Jack Parrock on the Greek debit crisis
The drama surrounding the Greek debt crisis is reaching its final act. [more]

Fiji qualify for Olympics after New Zealand expelled
New Zealand Football are challenging a decision which resulted in New Zealand's under-23 football team missing out on an Olympic berth. [more]

Beneficiary advocates accuse Work and Income of bending rules
Beneficiary advocates are accusing Work and Income of bending its own rules so it can slash benefits. [more]

Anne Tolley defends Work and Income
And listening to that is the Social Development Minister, Anne Tolley. [more]

Inquiry launched into Air Force sex assault complaint process
There'll be an independent inquiry into the way the Air Force handles sexual assault complaints after victims of a former sergeant spoke out about a lack of action. [more]

Djokovic downs Federer to win Wimbledon men's for third time
Novak Djokovic has beaten Roger Federer to win Wimbledon men's title for a third time. [more]

National bonspiel gets underway in Naseby today
A national bonspiel gets underway in Central Otago today - the first outdoor curling championship in three years. [more]

Unions unhappy with employment law changes
The Council of Trade Unions is accusing the Government of further entrenching the problems of zero hour contracts with its changes to employment laws. [more]

Consultancy stands by Labour's house buyer data
The consultancy that crunched the numbers behind Labour's controversial Chinese home-ownership data is standing by it and the final figure it came up with. [more]

UK scientist suggests a mini ice age be upon us
A Ukrainian-born, British-based scientist is warning that a mini ice age is almost upon us. [more]

1981 Silver Scroll to be awarded
The judges of this year's APRA Silver Scroll Awards are going back in time - all the way to 1981. [more]

Australia thrashed by England in first Ashes test
Australia have been thrashed by England in the first Ashes Test. [more]

Owners told to front up after horrific dog attacks
The owners of about 20 sheep who were savagely attacked by dogs in Christchurch want the dogs' owners to front up. [more]

NZ's climate change targets condemned
A group of scientists based in Europe have condemned New Zealand's latest pledge on greenhouse gas emissions. [more]

Auckland all-electric train era one week away
A week out from the introduction of an all-electric rail service in Auckland, the city's transport agency is warning commuters to expect teething problems. [more]

Tropical sea turtle washes up at Lyall Bay
An injured sea turtle, rarely found in New Zealand, washed up on the shore of Wellington's Lyall Bay this weekend. [more]

Phil Kafcaloudes with news from Australia
Our Melbourne correspondent Phil Kafcaloudes. [more]

New Horizons

New Horizons 12 July 2015
William Dart digs out his copy of the 2009 compilation release On The Horizon: Pages From Dunedin and catches up with a couple of the artists represented, Anthonie Tonnon and Nadia Reid. Following that he listens to a few recent local singles. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Samoan fior 13 July 2015
The latest news in Samoan language. [more]

News in Tongan for 13 July 2015
The latest news in Tongan language. [more]

News in French for 13 July 2015
The latest news in French language. [more]

Nine To Noon

How can we break the cycle of family violence?
New Zealand has a chronic family violence problem, with the third worst child abuse record after Mexico and the US out of 31 OECD countries. Massey University's Dr Ruth Gammon has worked with victims for the last 30 years and has advised on some of Child, Youth and Family's most complex cases. She says the solution lies in tailor-made, carefully targeted, 'wraparound' services, which are often talked about but rarely understood. She helped shape the US National Wraparound Initiative, which began in 2003. A similar model is being trialled by Auckland and Waitemata DHBs. Dr Ruth Gammon believes it needs to be more widely adopted across New Zealand. [more]

One less independent voice in Russia
After working as a foreign correspondent in Russia for 30 years Helen Womack has been blacklisted by the authorities and forced to stop working as a journalist, so she's decided to leave. We speak to her from Budapest about what she thinks about the state of Russia today and why she'll never stop loving it. Helen Womack has contributed to Fairfax from Moscow since 2003. She is the author of The Ice Walk: Surviving the Soviet Break-up and the New Russia. [more]

Inspiring young depression sufferers with a simple punctuation mark
Project Semicolon www.projectsemicolon.com is a non-profit movement dedicated to giving hope to people who are struggling with depression, suicide, addiction and self-harm. People draw or tattoo a semicolon on their wrist as a symbol of a conversation continued, not ended. The movement was founded by Amy Bleuel in 2013 after her father died of suicide when she was 18. [more]

Greece Correspondent Nathalie Savaricas
Greece Seeks Third Bailout in Brussels. [more]

Intrepid wildlife photographer, Steve Winter
The National Geographic photojournalist, Steve Winter, literally puts himself in harms way to get the perfect image, resulting in him being attacked by rhinos, charged by an 11 foot Siberian grizzly bear and trapped in quicksand. Steve Winter is giving talks in Auckland ( 5 August, Aotea Centre) and Wellington (6 August, Te Papa) [more]

Black Sheep: The Secret Benefits of Being Bad by Dr Richard Stephens
Black Sheep: The Secret Benefits of Being Bad by Dr Richard Stephens, Published by Hodder, RRP$37.99 [more]

Politics with Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton
Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton discuss politics. [more]

Genoese Pesto
Ron Parkin co-founded Genoese Pesto based in Ohau in the Horowhenua. He grows his basil in Fiji, and has grown the business from selling a few pots a week in the 1990s to gaining over 50% of the market share today. [more]

Urban issues with Tommy Honey
Urbanist Tommy Honey discusses progress with the Flag Consideration Panel. [more]

One In Five

Thumbs Up
Seven years ago, a group of parents, concerned that there were no quality services for their multi-impaired children post-schooling, got together to set up their own service, with the purpose of supporting their sons and daughters to participate meaningfully in their local community in Petone. [more]

Rural News

Morning Rural News for 13 July 2015
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Sounds Historical

Sounds Historical Hour One - 12 July 2015
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past. [more]

Sounds Historical Hour Two - 12 July 2015
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past. [more]

Spectrum

Automata Nocturne: A Night at the Museum
This week on Spectrum - A Night at the Museum. Katy Gosset heads to the Catlins in search of the Lost Gypsy Gallery. In remote Papatowai, Blair Somerville crafts automata, or moving sculptures, from recycled materials and displays them over the summer to appreciative tourists. But on a bleak winter's evening, during Blair's off season, Katy pays a visit after dark and takes a torchlight tour she calls 'Automata Nocturne'. [more]

Spiritual Outlook

Spiritual Outlook for 12 July 2015
A "golden" Koran and Arabic manuscripts - Religious treasures from Auckland City Libraries [more]

Standing Room Only

Ethics in fashion
An Auckland art project is trying to change our thinking about fashion, by encouraging us to create zero waste garments. For Make/Use a design team based at the Objectspace gallery are designing, making and modifying garments that not only produce no waste, but are fashionable and flattering. Internationally there's a real push for zero waste design and manufacture of products. Make/Use Project Leader Holly McQuillan says they've come up with several ways to help people interested in making their own zero waste garments. [more]

Dubbing was his DigiDestiny
American voice actor Joshua Seth has been heard in hundreds of video games, commercials and movies over the years. He's something of a specialist in the only type of foreign film and television that gets dubbed into English rather than subtitled: animation. He revoiced the villain Tetsuo in one of the biggest anime films of all time - the dystopian manga adaptation Akira. But the role that made his name and still brings in fanmail 15 years later was his role as Tai, the main character of the first two series of anime adventure Digimon. Joshua has also voiced parts in movies like The Spongebob SquarePants Movie over the years, though these days he uses his voice as a hypnotist/magician and he's bringing his show to New Zealand as part of Wellington Armageddon. [more]

Film with Kailey Carruthers
Kailey Carruthers reviews Magic Mike XXL, Terminator Genisys, and Madame Bovary. [more]

Jiwi's Machines
The exhibits inside MOTAT, the Auckland museum of transport and technology, are all about design and efficiency. Except for their latest acquisition. Joseph Herscher is a kinetic artist who builds Rube Goldberg machines; wonderfully over engineered, incredibly complicated contraptions designed to perform simple tasks. Joseph is filming a web series called Jiwi's Machines at MOTAT and during the day tests his inventions in front of live audiences. Justin Gregory went to meet the man and his machines. [more]

Stephen R. Bissette: comics pioneer & evangelist
Stephen R. Bissette is a teacher at Vermont's Centre for Cartoon Studies. Highlights of Stephen's comics career include co-creating sweetwise anti-hero magician John Constantine - as part of his, Alan Moore, and John Totleben's run of The Saga of The Swamp Thing, and initiating the 24 Hour Comics challenge - where participants have a day to write, and draw their own stories. Stephen talked to Shaun D Wilson ahead of appearing at Wellington Armageddon Expo [more]

The Laugh Track - Kirsten Morrell
Kirsten Morrell is best known for her tenure as lead singer for indie-pop group Goldenhorse, and subsequent solo album. She's trained in Opera, performed with the NZSO, and been part of shows including The Gilded Cage: A Steampunk Operetta and New Zealand Opera's 2013 production of Wagner's The Flying Dutchman. Kirsten also works Front of House at TAPAC where she's helping organise and will perform at a fundraising show in October. Kirsten's picks are Monty Python, The Mighty Boosh, The League of Gentleman, and W1A. [more]

OCBD: Obsessive compulsive bird drawing
Drawing birds takes patience. To really get a sense of their behaviour you can't just draw from a photograph. You have to spend time watching. Artist Niels Meyer-Westfeld moved to New Zealand from Germany, where he had a career as a graphic artist and part time landscape artist. But once he met our birds, he couldn't stop drawing them, which lead to his exhibit Land of Birds at Expressions Gallery and a related book. [more]

The Book Awards return and The Shadbolt Residency begins
New Zealand's writers were relieved to find out during the week that the New Zealand Book Awards have been resurrected thanks to an anonymous donation. There's more good news: writer Maurice Shadbolt's old home in Titirangi is to become the country's newest writer’s residency. The author of Season of the Jew - the first of The New Zealand Wars trilogy, and The Lovelock Version had four wives and no shortage of lovers during his lifetime, 40 years of which he spent at this house. The Shadbolt Residency has been years in the making. Naomi McCleary, who chairs the Going West Trust in partnership with Waitakere Local Community Board, says the house, while not flash, will offer writers plenty of material. [more]

Australasian theatre - Brett Adam
New Long Cloud Youth Theatre Artistic Director Brett Adam was previously the Head of Directing at Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School, and prior moving to Aotearoa he was a Director for Melbourne Theatre Company. We hear about the differences between New Zealand and Australian theatre, and his ambitions for the young company. His first production with Long Cloud, Live Acts On Stage, is by Australian writer Michael Gow. [more]

Te Ahi Kaa

Manu Tioriori – Te Kupu (Upper Hutt Posse)
Upper Hutt Posse began as a four piece reggae band in 1985, going on to release New Zealand's fist rap song 'E Tu' in 1988. Other songs include 'Ragga Girl', 'Stormy Weather' and 'Ka Whawhai Tonu Matou' (We will keep fighting). Justine Murray is with founder Te Kupu at his home to reflect on those thirty years, the music, the controversy and the political and socially conscious messages that have not wavered over time. [more]

Te Manu Korihi

Te Manu Korihi News for 13 July 2015
A Whanganui iwi says lifting the area's state of emergency has proved a game-change for those families still struggling to cope after the floods; A Whanganui tribal entity seeking to settle Treaty of Waitangi claims on behalf of its descendants is encouraging iwi members to vote for them this week to give them the mandate to settle with the Crown; A garden that showcases different varieties of New Zealand's indigenous flora in north-eastern France is being credited with promoting Maori culture in Europe; A group of Maori and Pasifika dancers will take to the international stage at the world's largest arts festival. [more]

Te Manu Korihi News for 13 July 2015
A Whanganui iwi says lifting the area's state of emergency has proved a game-change for those families still struggling to cope after the floods; A Whanganui tribal entity seeking to settle Treaty of Waitangi claims on behalf of its descendants is encouraging iwi members to vote for them this week to give them the mandate to settle with the Crown; A garden that showcases different varieties of New Zealand's indigenous flora in north-eastern France is being credited with promoting Maori culture in Europe; A group of Maori and Pasifika dancers will take to the international stage at the world's largest arts festival. [more]

War Reports

War Report - 12 July 2015
Jim Sullivan reads extracts from the Bank of New Zealand 1915 annual report which announces the employment of women cashiers to replace men joining the army and an editorial from the Otago Daily Times asking "When Will it End?" Bert Cooksley, later an MP, describes the food, flies and quieter times at Gallipoli. [more]

World & Pacific News

5am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest Pacific regional and sports news. [more]

6am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

7am World, Pacific and sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 July 2015
The latest world, Pacific and sports news. [more]

You Call This Art?

You Call this Art 2014 Part 1
In front of a Wellington audience, composer Ross Harris, film-maker Louis Sutherland and poets Geoff Cochrane and Bill Manhire discuss differences and similarities in their approaches to creativity, the importance of words and limitations. Justin Gregory is in the chair. Recorded in association with the Arts Foundation. [more]

News stories:

England win Ashes opener
England have beaten Australia by 169 runs and with a day to spare in the opening Ashes cricket test in Cardiff. [more]

Springbok skipper makes winning return
The Springbok captain Jean de Villiers has made his return to international rugby after knee surgery as South Africa started their road to the World Cup with a 46-10 win over a World XV in an exhibition game in South Africa. [more]

Wins for Broncos and Roosters
Brisbane's Queensland State of Origin heroes produced key performances to help the National Rugby League leaders beat Canterbury 16-8 in Sydney. [more]

Serb PM chased from massacre ceremony
Aleksandar Vucic has been chased by stone-throwing protesters at a ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre in Bosnia-Herzegovina. [more]

NZ population to hit 4.6 million tonight
Statistics New Zealand predicts that the population will reach 4.6 million at about 6.45pm tonight. [more]

IS claims responsibility for Cairo blast
Islamic State militants have said they were behind a deadly explosion that severely damaged the Italian consulate in Egypt's capital, Cairo. [more]

Crack down on Akl freedom campers
The Auckland Council says it is cracking down on freedom campers staying near the city's waterfront. [more]

Labour property claims 'shonky'
Labour's claims about how many offshore Chinese are buying homes in Auckland are being called 'shonky,' 'reprehensible,' and 'racist'. [more]

Combine firefighting services, says union
The Professional Firefighters Union wants rural and city firefighters to join forces saying the country isn't big enough to have two separate operations. [more]

Strawbridge shows signs of improvement
Chiefs assistant rugby coach Andrew Strawbridge remains in a critical condition in Waikato Hospital [more]

Typhoon Chan-hom pounds China
A typhoon has pounded the Chinese coast south of Shanghai, submerging roads, felling trees and forcing the evacuation of 1.1 million people. [more]

Williams Wimbledon champion again
The American world number one Serena Williams has won her sixth Wimbledon title and fourth successive grand slam crown by defeating the young Spaniard Garbine Muguruza in straight sets. [more]

Devine clubs India in first T20
The New Zealand women's cricket team have made a record start to their three match Twenty20 series against India in Bengaluru, with Sophie Devine scoring the fastest T20 international half-century in women's cricket. [more]

Eliza does a lot to earn silver medal
Auckland student Eliza McCartney has won New Zealand's second medal of the World University Games in South Korea, earning a silver in the women's pole vault. [more]

'Change rugby player eligibility rules'
All Blacks great Michael Jones, Manu Samoa co-coach Alama Ieremia and the NZRU chief want the IRB to allow players to switch between international teams [more]

Savage dog attack kills 21 sheep
A savage dog attack on sheep in the Christchurch suburb of Hei Hei has left 21 animals dead and others injured. [more]

'Punitive' sanctions frighten beneficiaries
Beneficiaries are intimidated and frightened by the "punitive" sanctions that Work and Income is imposing, say beneficiary advocates. [more]

'Single parents struggling' - whānau report
The Families Commission says New Zealand families and whānau are faring well with the exception of single parents. [more]

NZ medal tally grows in Korea
Two medals in track and field at the World University Games in Korea on Saturday have brought the New Zealand team's medal tally to five. [more]

Meyer looks for improvement
South Africa coach Heyneke Meyer is not satisfied with his team despite a handsome 46-10 victory over a World XV. [more]

Marques takes German pole
Honda's double world champion Marc Marquez took pole position for the German Grand Prix on an all-Spanish front row. [more]

Hingis wins Wimbledon doubles
Martina Hingis and partner Sania Mirza produced a stirring fightback to claim the Wimbledon women's doubles title. [more]

Concern over upping live sheep export numbers
Federated Farmers say the flow on effects of increasing live sheep exports to 250,000 a year would have to be carefully considered before it was given the go ahead. [more]

SH1 closed south of Taupo after truck caught fire
A truck that caught fire on State Highway 1 about 11 kilometres south of Taupo has caused the road's closure until 4.30pm. [more]

Thousands still stranded in Bali
Air New Zealand passengers who have been trying to get to Bali will now have to wait until at least Tuesday because of a volcanic ash cloud. [more]

Lee in contention for second PGA title
The New Zealand golfer Danny Lee is in contention for his second consecutive PGA victory, sitting in outright second place at the latest tour event in IIInois. [more]

Dozens of Gisborne homes still without power
At least 50 homes are still without power in remote parts of Gisborne after snow and ice knocked out parts of the region's power network last week. [more]

Air force investigates handling of complaints
The air force is investigating the way it deals with sexual offending complaints. [more]

Sea turtle washes up in Wellington
An endangered turtle, normally found in tropical climes, has washed up at Wellington's Lyall Bay beach and is now being treated by veterinarians at the zoo. [more]

Barfoot to investigate source of data leak
Real estate firm Barfoot and Thompson is to start its own investigation to find out if it is the source of leaked data being used by Labour. [more]

Golden glow for McBride at world cup regatta
The New Zealand rower Zoe McBride has won the women's lightweight single sculls at the world cup regatta in Lucerne. [more]

Can Federer overcome Djokovic?
Roger Federer will attempt to become the oldest Wimbledon champion in the professional era by beating Novak Djokovic in a repeat of last year's final. [more]

'Where's the zero hours contract ban?'
Labour accuses the Government of breaking its promise to ban zero hour contracts after Michael Woodhouse details law changes instead. [more]

NZ to send 16 firefighters to Canada
New Zealand is sending 16 firefighters to Canada to help battle out-of-control forest fires. [more]

EU summit on Greece cancelled - talks continue
A summit of all European Union members planned for Sunday has been cancelled as "very difficult" talks over a third bailout deal for Greece continue. [more]