Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 4th May 2017

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Business News, Checkpoint, Dateline Pacific, Extra Time, Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, Midday Report, Morning Report, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nights, Nine To Noon, Our Changing World, Pacific Correspondent, Parliament - Question Time, Radio New Zealand YouTube, Rural News, The 9th Floor, The House, The House On Demand, The Listen Anytime Library, The Panel, The Wireless, Upbeat, World & Pacific News

Business News

BNZ first half net profit falls 8 percent
The Bank of New Zealand has reported a lower half-year profit because of higher funding costs and a squeeze on its margins. [more]

Job ads pick up to strongest level in five months
The number of job advertisements has increased at the fastest rate in five months reflecting a strong labour market. [more]

British economist says CEOs shouldn't be paid incentives
A noted British economist says it's a bad idea to pay chief executives an incentive for doing their job well. [more]

Survey finds two thirds of New Zealanders don't carry cash
A survey indicates more than two-thirds of New Zealanders don't carry cash anymore. [more]

Midday Markets for 4 May 2017
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at FNZC. [more]

Business briefs
The outdoor clothing and sporting goods retailer, Kathmandu, says it's had a strong third quarter, with sales up 12 percent on the year earlier. [more]

Early Business News for 5 May 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Business News for 5 May 2017
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Markets Update for 5 May 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Checkpoint

RNZ Checkpoint with John Campbell Thursday 4th May 2017
Watch Thursday's full programme here. [more]

What is happening at Buckingham Palace?
An emergency meeting has reportedly been called at Buckingham Palace. UK correspondent Adam Gilchrist joins Checkpoint with the latest. [more]

Brownlee criticised for stance on Australia student fee changes
Gerry Brownlee has made his first visit as Foreign Minister, but critics say he is bowing down to the Australian government by agreeing more Kiwis will get an education if they have access to loans. [more]

Prisoner wants right to donate blood, organs and sperm
A convicted murderer has petitioned Parliament to be able to donate sperm and father a child from prison, but the Corrections Minister says prisoners lose that right. [more]

Majority of religion in state schools not regularly checked
More than 600 state schools teach Christianity, but not other religions. Zac Fleming investigates what schools offer religious education and what is taught. [more]

Evening business for Thurs 4 May
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Health Minister promises more money for mental health services
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has defended stretched mental health services, and promised more money in the upcoming Budget, but critics say he's just tinkering. [more]

Health Minister defends mental health services, promises more m
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has defended stretched mental health services, and promised more money in the upcoming Budget, but critics say he's just tinkering. [more]

Myrtle rust discovered on mainland New Zealand
A disease that damages plants including pohutukawa, manuka and feijoa trees has been found on mainland New Zealand for the first time. [more]

Preschool teacher accused of assault wasn't coping, Crown says
The Crown says a pre-school teacher wasn't coping with the stress of her job and at times used gratuitous violence by smacking children in her care to stop them doing things that annoyed her. [more]

Bull terrier needs new home after owner killed in crash
A one-year-old bull terrier pup named Doggy is looking for a new home after being found on a riverbank on Saturday following a car crash in which his owner was killed. [more]

Lobby group furious at Brownlee's comments on Aus education
Gerry Brownlee has been accused of rolling over and buying the Australian government's line on its tertiary education changes that would triple the cost of getting a degree for some Kiwis. [more]

Devastating plant disease found in NZ for first time
Myrtle rust, which is prevalent in eastern Australia and Tasmania, was discovered on Raoul Island in late March. It could devastate the feijoa and honey industries. [more]

Capital warned to prepare for Big One
Wellington is losing more than a million dollars a week as a result of the Kaikoura earthquake, with no end currently in sight. [more]

Floating orchard docks in New York City
The novel concept, which includes a garden and apple orchard, aims to create a unique public space where people can pick fresh herbs and vegetables for free. [more]

Dateline Pacific

Ocean explorers find "Forests" of coral near Cook Islands
Dense coral forests are among the surprising discoveries in the ocean depths near the Cook Islands. [more]

Pacific leaders urged to pressure Vietnam on poaching issue
Pacific leaders are being urged to increase the pressure on Vietnam to accept responsibility for its fishermen poaching beche de mer and other marine resources in the coastal waters of mulitple countries across the region. [more]

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 4 May 2017
Pacific leaders urged to pressure Vietnam on coastal poaching issue; Ocean explorers find "Forests" of coral near Cook Islands; The Tonga state broadcaster is undergoing an overhaul after PM complaints; Pacific journalists say Press freedom is still a challenge in the region; village outreach a new approach to healthcare in Niue. [more]

Youth engagement critical to sustained Pacific democracy
The Commonwealth Parliamentary Association secretary-general says that young people have views which must be listened to. Akbar Khan says that in the Pacific and other regions, youth must be engaged within the democratic process, or they will be lost to their countries. [more]

Fiji government disputes bill will gag criticism of MPs
The Fiji government says a new bill will not prevent criticism of MPs if enacted. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 5 May 2017
Fiji government disputes bill will gag criticism of MPs; Youth engagement critical to sustained Pacific democracy; Pacific leaders urged to pressure Vietnam on coastal poaching issue; Ocean explorers find "Forests" of coral near Cook Islands. [more]

Extra Time

Extra Time for 5 May 2017
This week, the gloves are off ahead of Joseph Parker's WBO heavyweight title defence, we talk League as the Kiwis try to end a four-test losing streak against the Kangaroos, Hamish Bond tells us what made him and Eric Murray so good, and All Black selector Grant Fox on injury woes ahead of the British and Irish Lions tour. [more]

Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm

School Fees across The Ditch
Australia has announced it will start charging New Zealanders full fees at its universities - which will at least triple the cost of most degrees. Now, education and policy researchers are warning primary and secondary school fees could be the next step in a crackdown across the Tasman on free public services for New Zealand migrants. Foreign Minister Gerry Brownlee met with his Australian counterpart, Julie Bishop, in Sydney this morning. They held a joint press conference and our political reporter, Benedict Collins, has the latest. [more]

Saturated Fat and Heart Disease
There can be a lot of confusion and distrust surrounding dietary advice for diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Last week, we spoke with one of the authors of an opinion piece published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, who argued the belief that saturated fats clog up the arteries, and so cause coronary heart disease, is just "plain wrong". But, that the disease is instead caused by chronic inflammation. But there are varying opinions in the medical community and not everyone agrees with the editorial piece. So when it comes to the causes of heart disease, what should we believe? Dr David Sullivan is a physician and chemical pathologist in the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney. [more]

Over the counter flu medication a waste of money?
Consumer New Zealand says sick people are better off taking painkillers and going to bed than shelling out for expensive flu remedies. It says the companies make misleading claims about their efficacy. [more]

Killer Instinct
Award-winning investigative journalist, Chris Hansen, reveals some of America's most shocking murders in a new Discovery Channel programme called Killer Instinct. [more]

Favourite Album
Today we are featuring the sixth studio album from English rock band The Electric Light Orchestra. In the beginning ELO, as they more famously became known, was an outlet for Jeff Lynne and Roy Wood's desire to create modern rock tunes with classical overtones, but Wood left the band after the first album and Lynne stepped into the limelight. A New World Record sold five million units in the first year of release and immediately changed the band's flagging fortunes in their homeland. In America, they still hold the record for having more top 40 hits than any other band in history, without ever reaching number one. Two track's from this album, however, did reach Number one in New Zealand. [more]

Theatre Critic - Leigh Sykes
The New Zealand international Comedy festival is well underway. There are more than 200 shows involving around 250 performers this year . It runs simultaneously in both Wellington and Auckland for three weeks, them many of the acts hot the road for shows all over the country. Leigh Sykes is a Performing Arts teacher at Hobsonville Point Secondary School in Auckland and has been to a few of the shows, including a proction featuring Chris Parker and Tomas Sainsbury . In their show "DOCing "Three D.O.C. workers and their pilot survive a helicopter crash in The Marlborough Sounds, but can they survive each other? [more]

Shamubeel Eaqub: Infrastructure Spending
Economist Shamubeel Eaqub talks about government spending on infrastructure and the ways to overcome the challenges of scale and volatility. [more]

The History of Social Conservatism in NZ
A lot of NZ's historical writing has focused on social liberalism and been written from a socially liberal perspective. Social conservatism has often been treated as a negative aspect of our society, especially by professional historians. Yet social conservatism has arguably been dominant over social liberalism in NZ until relatively recently. Victoria University historian, Grant Morris looks back. [more]

Short Story Club: Bull's Lace
We discuss Bull's Lace by Jenny Pattrick. [more]

The Expats: Kathryn Minchin in Kyoto
Kathryn Minchin first went to Japan on a short homestay programme through Lion's Club during her last year of High School. She fell in love with the country and now lives in Kyoto. [more]

This Way Up
Junk Run is a rubbish collection service with a difference. Covering the Auckland area, it collects all sorts of unwanted objects- from aquariums, office furniture and old telephones to kitchen units - and finds new homes for them. So rather than going to landfill, about three-quarters of what it collects ends up reused and redistributed to charities, repairers and recyclers. This Way Up's Simon Morton went to the Junk Run warehouse in Eden Terrace to meet Fionna Gotts. [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 4 May 2017
The Health Minister says seclusion and restraint are over-used in mental health and a major earthquake would devastate Wellington's economy. [more]

Midday Sports News for 4 May 2017
History suggests otherwise but New Zealand rugby league forward Simon Mannering insists the Kiwis are no longer intimidated by Australia. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Friday 5 May 2017
It was the bad news the Ministry for Primary Industries had been expecting since myrtle rust first appeared in Australia... the airborne fungus is now in Northland and a full-scale biosecurity operation is now underway in Kerikeri. MPI's response director Geoff Gwyn says myrtle rust has never been eradicated sucessfully internationally but there are a lot of things they can do in the long term. He says at the moment "we have a contained and isolated find and we are throwing the kitchen sink at it." Buckingham Palace has announced that Prince Philip will retire in August. Ben Lewis, a correspondent in London for Australia's Channel Seven, says many people were concerned for the Queen and Prince Philip when the emergency meeting was called - but fortunately it wasn't the news some of them expected. There are warnings Cyclone Donna could become a severe category 4 storm with very destructive wind gusts as high as 260 kilometres an hour. The Cyclone was forecast to make landfall overnight in Vanuatu. RNZI's Moera Tuilaepa-Taylor has the latest. A review of the Kaikoura earthquake has revealed it generated an almost 7 metre tsunami but the minimal impact of the wave was down to luck. Sarah Stuart-Black, the director of Civil Defence, says the situation with the earthquake was changing rapidly overnight and it initially looked like an onshore earthquake which wouldn't trigger a tsunami. Gill Jolly, GNS's natural hazards division director, says that due to complexity of the quake they are still trying to unravel the pieces of the jigsaw. Changes to Working for Families appear to be on the cards, as the Government talks about ways to raise the incomes of low and middle income earners. The Finance Minister is preparing to deliver his first budget later this month and says one of the best ways to raise those incomes is changing Working for Families. Women in the Mongrel Mob say the gang culture is changing, and there are fewer instances of rape and violence towards women, with members attending leadership workshops and even holding events to celebrate their wives, mothers and daughters. [more]

Sports News for 5 May 2017
A update from the team at RNZ sport. [more]

Bill to repeal and replace Obamacare to be voted on
The Hill's Brent Budowski says a group of Republicans will be huddled at the back hoping they don't have to vote yes - but he's still expecting the bill to pass, albeit narrowly. [more]

Joseph Parker's first coach on the champion's start in boxing
Ahead of his first WBO title defence, Joseph Parker's first coach talks about the champion's start in the sport. [more]

Prime Minister Winston Peters?
Winston Peters' says a member of the NZ First team negotiating possible coalition arrangements, reminded both Labour and National that it was not unprecedented for the leader of the second largest party in the coalition to become Prime Minister. [more]

Gang woman says there's now less violence against women
A woman who's spent most of her life in either Black Power or the Mongrel Mob has described how she narrowly escaped being pack raped when she was 17. An ex-partner of a Mongrel Mob leader, Te Atawhai Te Rangi says attitudes towards women have improved and they are no longer treated like pieces of meat. [more]

Sports News for 5 May 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Biosecurity op launched in Kerikeri over myrtle rust
It was the bad news the Ministry for Primary Industries had been expecting since myrtle rust first appeared in Australia... the airborne fungus is now in Northland and a full-scale biosecurity operation is now underway in Kerikeri. [more]

MPI hopes to beat the odds with myrtle rust outbreak
MPI's response director Geoff Gwyn says myrtle rust has never been eradicated sucessfully internationally but there are a lot of things they can do in the long term. He says at the moment "we have a contained and isolated find and we are throwing the kitchen sink at it." [more]

Prince Philip's retirement keeps world in suspense
Buckingham Palace has announced that Prince Philip will retire in August. Ben Lewis, a correspondent in London for Australia's Channel Seven, says many people were concerned for the Queen and Prince Philip when the emergency meeting was called - but fortunately it wasn't the news some of them expected. [more]

Cyclone Donna could become category 4
There are warnings Cyclone Donna could become a severe category 4 storm with very destructive wind gusts as high as 260 kilometres an hour. The Cyclone was forecast to make landfall overnight in Vanuatu. RNZI's Moera Tuilaepa-Taylor has the latest. [more]

Kaikoura earthquake generated 6.9 metre tsunami
A review of the Kaikoura earthquake has revealed it generated an almost 7 metre tsunami but the minimal impact of the wave was down to luck. Sarah Stuart-Black, the director of Civil Defence, says the situation with the earthquake was changing rapidly overnight and it initially looked like an onshore earthquake which wouldn't trigger a tsunami. Gill Jolly, GNS's natural hazards division director, says that due to complexity of the quake they are still trying to unravel the pieces of the jigsaw. [more]

Changes to working for families on the cards
Changes to Working for Families appear to be on the cards, as the Government talks about ways to raise the incomes of low and middle income earners. The Finance Minister is preparing to deliver his first budget later this month and says one of the best ways to raise those incomes is changing Working for Families. [more]

Mob women say gang members raping, beating them less
Women in the Mongrel Mob say the gang culture is changing, and there are fewer instances of rape and violence towards women, with members attending leadership workshops and even holding events to celebrate their wives, mothers and daughters. [more]

Helen Clark: no regrets over Foreshore and Seabed controversy
In RNZ's latest edition of 'The 9th Floor,' former Prime Minister Helen Clark insists she has no regrets about her government's handling of the Foreshore and Seabed controversy in 2004. At the time, new legislation was ushered in, stripping Maori of ownership and giving it to the Crown. The Maori Party says Helen Clark hasn't seen the error of her ways. [more]

France heads to polls in two days time
The French Presidential elections are this Sunday. .Christian Malard from i24 News says Emmanuel Macron won the last debate and is beating Marine Le Pen in the polls. "I will make a bet that Macron will win on Sunday... But we need to be careful." [more]

Tempers flare ahead of Anzac Test
A war of words is breaking out off the league field ahead of tonight's final Anzac match between the Kiwis and the Kangaroos. Australia's coach has claimed NZ is nowhere to be seen in Canberra in the lead up to the test, while his side has been fulfilling its promotional obligations. Matt Chatterton explains. [more]

Sports News for 5 May 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

NZ-bound fertiliser ship snagged in Saharan stoush
A " very long-standing and complex political and geopolitical dispute" in the Western Sahara has seen a ship full of fertilizer, bound for New Zealand, stopped in South Africa. A 50,000 tonne shipment, an eighth of New Zealand's yearly needs of phosphate, was being imported by fertilizer company Ballance Agri-Nutrients. It's been held up by claims of illegal mining. [more]

Industry denies cold, flu medicine make unsubstantiated claims
The cold medicine industry is rubbishing the idea sick people are better off taking painkillers and going to bed than taking over-the-counter cold-and-flu remedies. Scott Milne, the executive director of the New Zealand Self Medication Industry Association, says "there aren't too many products that survive on the market for 50 years that don't work". [more]

Kaikoura mayor grateful region didn't get full force of tsunami
The fact that the seabed lifted during November's earthquake was "probably the saving grace" according to Kaikoura's mayor, Winston Gray. A review by the Ministry of Civil Defence found an almost 7 metre tsunami generated by the earthquake the tsunami would have caused more damage to the region if it hadn't occurred at low tide and the land hadn't been simultaneously lifted upwards. [more]

Myrtle Rust makes landfall sooner than hoped
Scientists and industry groups have been bracing for the arrival of myrtle rust for a number of years. The chief executive of Apiculture New Zealand Karin Kos, and Director of New Zealand's Biological Heritage National Science Challenge, Andrea Byrom explain. [more]

Free curtains on offer in Waiau to warm quake-hit homes
Keeping out the cold in the badly quake-damaged North Canterbury town of Waiau has just become a little easier, with a pop-up curtain bank helping locals. [more]

Mental health advocate reviews Govt movement on sector weakness
The Health Minister Jonathan Coleman announced changes to the mental health sector yesterday. But Marianne Elliott from the People's Mental Health Review says it will do little to address years of neglect in the sector. [more]

Activists say NZ needs to stop importing African phosphate
A New Zealand ship full of fertilizer has been stopped in South Africa over claims it was illegally mined. Western Sahara Resource Watch lobbiest Erik Hagen says the situation is not complex, it is very simple. [more]

Water pollution inevitable even if nitrogen use curtailed now
Nitrogen leaching from agricultural soils was estimated to have increased nearly a third between 1990 and 2012... and now a water quality scientist is warning New Zealand's water will be polluted for decades even if we stop adding nitrogen to the soil right now. [more]

World of driverless cars could be just 13 years away
A new report says ditching the car and relying instead on shared, electric cars could save thousands of dollars a year; cut greenhouse gas emissions and save time. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Samoan for 5 May 2017
The latest news in Samoan language (Gagana Samoa). [more]

News in Tongan for 5 May 2017
The latest news in Tongan language (Lea Faka-Tonga). [more]

Nights

Tracing the history of punitive passages
Clare Anderson is the investigator of a research project on convict transportation and penal colonies, based at the University of Leicester. She'll be joining us to talk about sending people away to serve their sentences. [more]

Nights' Culture - Fergus Barrowman
Jivester, editor and publisher Fergus Barrowman on the sizzle and pop of a snazzy beat... [more]

Nine To Noon

Auckland businesses install ‘anti homeless’ sprinkler systems
One school and several businesses in Auckland's CBD have installed overnight sprinkler systems in their doorways to deter rough sleepers. The Chamber of Commerce says it does not condone the practice but it is an expression of frustration from business owners that the council is not doing more to deal with the issue of homelessness. Kathryn Ryan speaks with Chief Executive Michael Barnett, and Auckland City Councillor Cathy Casey. [more]

Sparks fly ahead of fiery French vote
French far-right leader Marine Le Pen and centrist young gun, Emmanuel Macron go head-to-head on Sunday 7th May in France's presidential election after one of the most bitter, divisive and unpredictable campaigns in decades. Sophie Pedder is the Paris bureau chief for The Economist. [more]

The end of the cult of car ownership?
Kathryn Ryan talks with Stanford University lecturer Tony Seba who has co-authored a report predicting the impact of driver-less cars. He says within 10 years of regulatory approval, 95% of passenger miles traveled in the United States will be in autonomous electric vehicles. [more]

Pacific correspondent Mike Field
The Pacific nations are now the most Mormon nations in the world, strange events in American Samoa with Vice President Pence, why build Munda airport?- and an update on Cyclone Donna. [more]

"Just plant sh*t !" Gangsta gardener promotes spades not guns
Ron Finley and other gangsta gardeners like him are planting to transform their neighbourhoods, in some of America's most notoriously dangerous places. For Ron the story begins in front of his house in South Central LA, where he turned the curbside into an edible garden. Fast forward to today and his belief that urban gardens build communities has blossomed considerably into the Ron Finley Project. His story, and others like him, is the subject of a documentary called 'Can You Dig This?' which is screening at the Architecture and Design Film Festival in Auckland, Wellington, Dunedin and Christchurch from May through to July. [more]

Book review: 'Admissions: A Life in Brain Surgery'
Tilly Lloyd reviews 'Admissions: A Life in Brain Surgery' by Henry Marsh. [more]

New music with Grant Smithies
Grant Smithies celebrates two records released this very day: the debut full-length album from Auckland's Fazerdaze and a new compilation of bleakly beautiful songs from articulate Aussie sinner, Nick Cave. [more]

Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
Sports commentator Brendan Telfer. [more]

The Week that was with Te Radar and Gemma Gracewood
The Week that was with Te Radar and Gemma Gracewood. [more]

Our Changing World

Shedding light on the world of moths
Ahi Pepe | Moth Net is a Te Reo-focused citizen science project involving primary schools collecting information about moths in their neighbourhoods. [more]

Pacific Correspondent

Pacific Correspondent for 4 May 2017
We hear from our Correspondent in American Samoa. [more]

Parliament - Question Time

Question Time for 4 May 2017
GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statements yesterday on the Household Labour Force Survey; if so, by how much has the number of 15 to 24-year-olds who are not in employment, education, or training increased since his Government took office? TODD MULLER to the Minister of Finance: What is the Government’s plan for reducing net debt as a percentage of GDP? Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Does he support the New Zealand sponsored UN Security Council resolution of 23 December 2016 that condemned the expansion of Israeli settlements in occupied Palestinian territory? SARAH DOWIE to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: What recent announcements has he made in relation to Pay Equity? KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does she stand by the statement of her predecessor, “breaking the cycle of imprisonment and reoffending is a key focus of this Government. That’s why we set the ambitious and challenging goal of reducing prisoner reoffending by 25 percent by 2017”; if so, does she agree with the decision to drop the Better Public Services Target of reducing re-offending by 25 percent? PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: What reports has he received on the rate of employment in New Zealand? CARMEL SEPULONI to the Minister for Social Development: Is she concerned that the March quarterly benefit figures show that only 42.3 percent of those who cancelled a benefit did so because they had obtained work? Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for the Environment: Does he stand by all his statements on Pike River mine; if so, how? EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for Primary Industries: Does he stand by his statement, “There’s no way that we can double the number of cows in New Zealand”? TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Corrections: What recent announcement has she made regarding online learning for prisoners? DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Does he stand by the Government’s “social investment” approach when the number of 15 to 19-year-old youth not in employment, education, or training increased in the last quarter by over 3,000 young people to be at its highest level since 2011? Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister of Health: How many more New Zealanders are accessing mental health and addiction services now than in 2007/08, expressed as a percentage increase; and what is the corresponding percentage growth in funding for mental health and addiction services over the same time period? [more]

Radio New Zealand YouTube

Rumours aplenty after meeting reportedly called at Buckingham Palace 3412 75361
An emergency meeting has reportedly been called at Buckingham Palace. UK correspondent Adam Gilchrist joins Checkpoint with the latest. [more]

Prisoner wants right to donate blood, organs and sperm
Labour MP Trevor Mallard has presented a petition to Parliament from convicted murderer Karl Nuku, who is calling for prisoners to be able to give blood, donate organs and father children. [more]

Evening business for Thurs 4 May
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Myrtle rust discovered on mainland New Zealand
A disease that damages plants including pohutukawa, manuka and feijoa trees has been found on mainland New Zealand for the first time. [more]

Health Minister defends mental health services, promises more money
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has defended stretched mental health services, and promised more money in the upcoming Budget, but critics say he's just tinkering. [more]

Preschool teacher accused of assault wasn't coping, Crown says
The Crown says a pre-school teacher wasn't coping with the stress of her job and at times used gratuitous violence by smacking children in her care to stop them doing things that annoyed her. [more]

Bull terrier needs new home after owner killed in crash
A one-year-old bull terrier pup named Doggy is looking for a new home after being found on a riverbank on Saturday following a car crash in which his owner was killed. [more]

Devastating plant disease found in NZ for first time
Myrtle rust, which is prevalent in eastern Australia and Tasmania, was discovered on Raoul Island in late March. It could devastate the feijoa and honey industries. [more]

Floating orchard docks in New York City
The novel concept, which includes a garden and apple orchard, aims to create a unique public space where people can pick fresh herbs and vegetables for free. [more]

RNZ Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 4th May 2017
This channel is used to live-stream Checkpoint with John Campbell - RNZ's multi-platform drive-time news and current affairs programme, tackling the national and international stories of the day. [more]

Rural News

Midday Rural News for 4 May 2017
News from the rural and farming sectors. [more]

Morning Rural News for 5 May 2017
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

The 9th Floor

The Commander - Helen Clark
In part five of The 9th Floor, Guyon Espiner talks to Helen Clark about her three terms in power as she sought to draw a line under Rogernomics, unleash new social reforms and rethink New Zealand's place in the world. [more]

The House

Love thy neighbour - MPs praise NZ's Pacific advocacy
The government’s support for its Pacific neighbours has been praised in the House by members during a debate on government spending. [more]

The House On Demand

The House for 1035pm Thurs 4 May
The latest from the House [more]

The Listen Anytime Library

Passport to Hell - by Robin Hyde Ep 8
Court Martial. [more]

The Panel

One Quick Question for 4 May 2017
We find the answers to any queries you can think up. [more]

The Panel pre-show for 4 May 2017
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. [more]

The Panel with Catherine Robertson and Emma Espiner (Part 1)
Our new Foreign Affairs Minister Gerry Brownlee hasn't made a dent in the Australian attitude to kiwis. Ex-pat Kyle Lockwood talks about discrimination in Australia. The chair of the Law Society's Property Section Duncan Terris talks about property contracts if you can get out of them. It can be very hard for women over 50 to find a place to live. [more]

The Panel with Catherine Robertson and Emma Espiner (Part 2)
People are committing crimes and displaying their greatest pain and suffering on social media. What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Emma Espiner want to talk about. A new biography about Barack Obama exposes the former US president's drug taking, relationships and infidelity. Infectious diseases expert Michael Baker of the University of Otago explains why cold and flu medicines don't work. A convicted murderer wants to be able to donate sperm so he can father a child. The Imperial tobacco company is looking at growing the market for caffeine energy supplements. [more]

Brownlee's first 48 hours
Our new Foreign Affairs Minister Gerry Brownlee hasn't made a dent in the Australian attitude to kiwis. Ex-pat Kyle Lockwood talks about discrimination in Australia. [more]

Elderly woman wants to get out of house sale
The chair of the Law Society's Property Section Duncan Terris talks about property contracts if you can get out of them. [more]

Finding a place to live when single, female and over 50
It can be very hard for women over 50 to find a place to live. [more]

Social media - the new social services?
People are committing crimes and displaying their greatest pain and suffering on social media. [more]

Panel Says
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Ema Espiner want to talk about. [more]

Barack Obama laid bare
A new biography about Barack Obama exposes the former US president's drug taking, relationships and infidelity. [more]

Cold and flu remedies largely bogus
Infectious diseases expert Michael Baker of the University of Otago explains why cold and flu medicines don't work. [more]

Fathering inside prison
A convicted murderer wants to be able to donate sperm so he can father a child. [more]

From nicotine to caffeine
The Imperial tobacco company is looking at growing the market for caffeine energy supplements. [more]

The Wireless

The Grow Room Profiles - Badcorporation
Mr King and Mr Hendriks discuss how working for Badcorporation has transformed their music careers. [more]

Where fighters become champions
Ahead of Joseph Parker's next heavyweight title bout we meet the young boxers coming up at his old gym, Papatoetoe Boxing Club. [more]

Upbeat

Kiwi period flutist returns home
Renowned New Zealand period flautist Melissa Farrow is home for NZ Barok’s Autumn Notes season. The leading historic flute and recorder player is based in Sydney where she’s the principal flutist for the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra. She’s performing works by Carl Friederich Abel, Haydn, WF Bach, Boyce and Sammartini in the baroque orchestra’s first performance for 2017. [more]

Kaleidoscopes with Kathryn Stott
Grammy Award winning British pianist Kathryn Stott started her tour here last night with a performance of Rachmaninov’s 4th piano concerto with the APO; to be repeated this evening in Takapuna with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra. Then Kathryn is straight into Chamber Music New Zealand's tour with the New Zealand String Quartet. She’s also famous for her relationship with cellist Yo Yo Ma with whom she discovered tango and other Latin dance music, winning a Grammy for her South American CD Soul of the Tango.   [more]

World & Pacific News

1pm Pacific Regional News for 4 May 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

3pm Pacific Regional News for 4 May 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

7pm Pacific Regional News for 4 May 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 5 May 2017
The latest World, Pacific and sports news. [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 5 May 2017
The latest World, Pacific and sports news. [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 5 May 2017
The latest World, Pacific and sports news. [more]

News stories:

Religious education teaching that 'Christianity is superior'
The government is being accused of breaching the Bill of Rights Act with religious instruction in schools. [more]

National party received assurances about sound-alike track
A National Party election campaign song said to be similar to an Eminem track did not breach copyright, a court has been told. [more]

Canterbury Rugby tackles racial abuse
After a turbulent year of complaints about players' conduct the Canterbury Rugby Union has launched a new campaign aimed at stopping racism on the rugby pitch. [more]

Fiji lawyer says bill has no legal equivalent worldwide
A Fiji lawyer says he can find no legal equivalent in any democratic country of a bill that could prevent criticism of parliament. [more]

Carrington turns attention to team boat
World and Olympic kayak champion Lisa Carrington will skip her favoured K1 200 metre event instead turning her focus to New Zealand's flourishing team boats in the upcoming World Cup series in Europe. [more]

Russell penalty shot leads Black Sticks to a win
A strong defence effort and a penalty goal helped the New Zealand men's hockey team defeat Malaysia 1-0 at the Sultan Azlan Shah Cup. [more]

FBI head 'nauseous' over his possible sway on US election
FBI Director James Comey has said it makes him "mildly nauseous" to think that he could have had an impact on the US presidential election. [more]

Brownlee: NZ should not intervene on Israel/Palestine conflict
Within 48 hours of becoming Foreign Minister, Gerry Brownlee has called the New Zealand co-sponsored UN resolution on Israel 'premature'. [more]

Foran and Packer back for Kiwis
Born-again prop Russell Packer has bolted into the Kiwis starting line-up to face Australia in tomorrow night's Anzac rugby league Test in Canberra. [more]

Fears raised over school fees for Kiwis in Australia
Making New Zealanders in Australia pay to send their children to school is a real possibility, the government is being warned. [more]

Nastase not welcome at Wimbledon
Former Romanian tennis player Ilie Nastase will not be welcome at this year's Wimbledon championships and could be stopped at the gate if he tries to attend. [more]

Teachers will be 'fixated' on maths and writing data - unions
A new government target for writing and maths in primary and intermediate schools will come at a cost to other subjects, warn education unions. [more]

Culture of fear exists in Tonga media - publisher
Journalists fear doing their jobs after the Prime Minister sacked leaders of the Tonga Broadcasting Commission, according to prominent publisher Kalafi Moala. [more]

Sport: Australians eye more success at PNG Open
Australian golfer Josh Cabban is bidding for a second title in three years when the Papua New Guinea Open tees off in Port Moresby this morning. [more]

Sport: PNG and Samoa women set up T20 cricket decider
PNG and Samoa have set up a winner-takes-all decider after contrasting victories in the penultiumate round of the Women's World T20 - East Asia-Pacific Cricket Qualifier. [more]

Worker perks on offer as labour market tightens
Four-day weeks, social outings and weekends away are among benefits on offer from companies competing for workers in a tight labour market. [more]

May attacks on 'bureaucrats of Brussels' condemned
The UK Prime Minister has accused European politicians of making 'threats' against Britain to try to influence the general election. [more]

Solomons Police working to resolve squatter conflict
The police in Solomon Islands say they have restored order in West Honiara where a house was burnt down following clashes between groups of armed men. [more]

Give Pacific democracies time to develop, says McKinnon
A former Commonwealth secretary-general says Pacific Island countries shouldn't be pushed too abruptly in their democratic development. [more]

Solomons Police working to resolve squatter conflict
The police in Solomon Islands say they have restored order in West Honiara where a house was burnt down following clashes between groups of men armed with home-made weapons and who were throwing stones. [more]

Jailed Nauru protestors to appeal Aust High Court
Three Nauru men whose jail sentences were dramatically increased this week plan to appeal to the High Court of Australia. [more]

Christchurch encouraged to put the brakes on poor driving
Bad driving habits like weaving between lanes and hesitating when the light turns green are being targeted by a Christchurch transport group. [more]

Injury toll mounting ahead of Lions Tour
Headaches for All Blacks hooker Dane Coles could also create headaches for the All Blacks coach Steve Hansen as the injury toll among his veteran forwards continue to mount. [more]

Dozens killed many more trapped in Iran mine explosion
Dozens of miners and rescuers have been killed after a explosion at a coal mine in northern Iran, reports say. [more]

American Samoa airline loses some federal authorisation
The US Department of Transportation has withdrawn authorisation for some services operated by American Samoa's Inter Island Airways. [more]

PNG PM in firing line in Popondetta
PNG's prime minister has been criticised for not attending the opening of a hospital facility in Oro province. [more]

Possible media downsizing threatens democracy - mayors
Threatened provincial newspapers are being defended as 'vital' by community leaders, who say they are essential for democracy. [more]

Reoffending target 'was never realistic'
The government's scrapped reoffending target was 'a nonsense' and unrealistic, social policy experts say. [more]

CNMI former deputy cop convicted again
The troubled Northern Marianas former deputy police chief has been convicted of further offences. [more]

Council earned $140m from stolen land - Treaty group
The New Plymouth District Council is being urged to be up front about the millions of dollars it has earned from land stolen from Waitara hapu in the 1860s. [more]

New approach in Niue village health outreach
Increasing health issues remain a concern in Niue despite a number of health initiatives implemented on the island over the last decade. [more]

Man falls to his death from hospital roof
A man has fallen to his death from a roof at a South Auckland hospital where he was carrying out repairs. [more]

Facebook comments: Is there a male equivalent of a vile hag?
Analysis - Gender as a topic always seems to attract abuse, as RNZ's The 9th Floor interview with Jenny Shipley shows very clearly, writes Megan Whelan. [more]

Fatal house fire in Oamaru
A person has died in a house fire in Oamaru, police say. [more]

Former All Black first-five dies after long battle with cancer
The former All Black and Manawatu player Doug Rollerson has died following a long battle with cancer. [more]

Veteran photojournalist decries lack of Pacific coverage
An Australian photojournalist says the lack of Pacific coverage in major newsrooms is worrying given the latest geo-political shifts. [more]

Sport: Relaxed eligibility rules boost for Pacific league teams
Toa Samoa wing Antonio Winterstein says the loosening of eligibility rules is a positive step for international rugby league. [more]

Balloon failure a downer - NASA
NASA's latest super pressure balloon flight has come to an untimely end just over a week after its launch from Wanaka. [more]

US mortuary sued for refusing gay man's funeral
A mortuary in Mississippi is being sued by the husband of a gay man for allegedly refusing to cremate him because of his sexuality. [more]

Job ads at five-month high
The number of job advertisements has picked up to the highest level in five months, reflecting a strong labour market. [more]

Tonga PM's overhaul of TBC triggers media concerns
The Tongan government appears to have cracked down on what it calls unfair reporting of its affairs by overhauling the leadership of the state broadcaster. [more]

Pacific leaders urged to pressure Vietnam on poaching issue
Pacific leaders are being urged to increase the pressure on Vietnam to accept responsibility for its fishermen poaching marine resources in coastal waters. [more]

Driver caught up in pursuit not checked on - IPCA
Police failed to check on a driver whose car was badly damaged when it was hit by another vehicle officers were pursuing, an investigation has found. [more]

Tonga tops global stats in Mormon membership
Tonga has the highest number of Mormons in the world on a per capita basis, according to researchers. [more]

Action urged on threats against journalists in West Papua
A human rights advocate says more needs to be done to stop threats and violence against journalists in Indonesia's West Papua region. [more]

'Tasman Tempest' caused $42m in damage
Insurance costs from the storm in March, which dumped a month's worth of rain on Auckland and Coromandel in just 24 hours, have hit $42 million. [more]

Robot explorers glean marine data for Cook Islands
New Zealand scientists researching deep seas off the Cook Islands say they've gleaned valuable information about the make-up and biodiversity of the area. [more]

BNZ first-half net profit falls 8 percent
The Bank of New Zealand's first half profit has fallen as it felt pressure on its margins and a fall in the valuer of some investments. [more]

Commodity prices steady in April
New Zealand's commodity prices have held steady because of robust demand and supply shortages. [more]

New Caledonia referendum roll released
The preliminary electoral rolls for next year's independence referendum in New Caledonia have been released. [more]

Two dead in Canterbury crash
Two people are dead following a crash between a van and a ute in Canterbury this afternoon. [more]

Seven strong NZ contingent line-up for Badminton
There will be a strong contingent of New Zealand riders competing at the prestigious Badminton Horse trials starting in England tonight. [more]

Kiwis coach rejects Kangaroos criticism
The New Zealand coach David Kidwell has hit back at Australian criticism the Kiwis hadn't helped promote Friday's Test match in Canberra, saying they were focused on playing the game. [more]

Govt embarks on five-year plan to improve mental health services
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has defended the embattled mental health system today, saying it is facing high demand. [more]

Tourism Minister advises 'sense of humour' over Mt Taranaki nude photo
Tourism Minister Paula Bennett was not offended by a young woman's nude photoshoot on Mt Taranaki, but says she will not be stripping down herself. [more]

Chch prison staff on leave amid security concerns
The head of Christchurch Men's Prison and two senior staff are on special leave as Corrections investigates security procedures. [more]

Missing Israeli tourist found
An Israeli man missing on the South Island's West Coast has been found, after spending two days in a national park. [more]

Expensive remedies duping sick consumers - Consumer NZ
Sick people are better off taking painkillers and going to bed than shelling out for expensive flu remedies that make misleading claims, Consumer NZ says. [more]

One person seriously injured in Carterton crash
At least one person is seriously injured following a two-car crash on State Highway 2 in Clareville, near Carterton in the Wairarapa. [more]

Four Auckland schools receive hoax bomb threats
Police have been investigating a series of email bomb threats to Auckland schools. [more]

Accused pre-school teacher was under strain - Crown
A pre-school teacher who wasn't coping with the stress of her job at times used gratuitous violence by smacking children in her care, the Crown says. [more]

The first Pasifika African theatre production in Aotearoa
'In Transit' shares true stories about refugees and migrants from their African countries to Aotearoa. [more]

Fiji's Levuka goes tobacco-free
The Fiji town of Levuka has been launched as a tobacco-free town. [more]

'No cause for alarm' over Buckingham Palace staff meeting
Officials say there is no cause for alarm over a staff meeting called at Buckingham Palace. [more]

Fiji airways fleet to be world's youngest
Fiji Airways will start receiving five new Boeing 787 MAX aircraft from 2018. [more]

Police release Auckland bank robbery footage
A man who threatened staff with a firearm in the suburb of Glenfield yesterday is still on the loose. [more]

Cyclone Donna strengthens to category 3 in Vanuatu
Tropical Cyclone Donna has strengthened to a category 3 storm as it approaches Vanuatu's north. [more]

Fiji government says bill does not block criticism of MPs
The Fiji government says a new bill will not prevent criticism of the government or MPs if enacted. [more]

Scientists keep eye in the sky on rare NZ birds
A satellite is now being used to count the endangered northern royal albatross, which breeds on the Chatham Islands. [more]

Pohutukawa, manuka and feijoa under threat
Myrtle rust, which damages trees including pohutukawa, manuka and feijoa, has been found on mainland New Zealand for the first time. [more]

BREAKING - Prince Philip to retire from royal duties, Buckingham Palace says
BREAKING - Prince Philip to retire from royal duties, Buckingham Palace says [more]

Big quake would cost Wellington economy $25bn - report
Wellington's economy would be devastated if the capital was hit by a similar earthquake to the 2011 Canterbury quake, a new report says. [more]

Prince Philip to stand down from royal duties
The Queen's 95-year-old husband will retire from royal duties in August, Buckingham Palace says. [more]

Phosphate shipment seized over illegal mining claims
A huge shipment of phosphate bound for New Zealand has been seized in South Africa because of claims it was illegally mined. [more]

Brownlee accused of 'rolling over' on Aussie study costs
Foreign Minister Gerry Brownlee has been accused of rolling over and adopting the Australian government's position on its controversial education changes. [more]