Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 12th October 2017

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Business News, Checkpoint, Dateline Pacific, Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, Midday Report, Morning Report, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nights, Nine To Noon, Our Changing World, Pacific Correspondent, Rural News, The Long Way Home, The Panel, The Wireless, Upbeat, World & Pacific News

Business News

Evening Business for 12 October 2017
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Early Business News for 13 October 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Business News for 13 October 2017
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Markets Update for 13 October 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

SkyCity buys majority stake in AA Centre for $47m
The Auckland casino operator, SkyCity Entertainment has bought an 85 percent stake in a central city office block from the property investor, NPT, for 47 million dollars. [more]

Manufacturing index dips in September
Activity in the manufacturing sector remains steady -- but the sector expects to hire fewer people. [more]

Economic development agencies want more resources
Regional economic development agencies want to take the lead in helping their areas become more profitable and productive. [more]

Midday Markets for 13 October 2017
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners. [more]

Warehouse founder taking a year off
The founder of The Warehouse is taking a year off from the board to focus on other commitments, including preperations for the next America's Cup. [more]

Business briefs
Tauranga based-power company TrustPower is forecasting a lift in its full year operating earnings by as much as 30 million dollars to between 255 million and 270 million dollars. [more]

Checkpoint

Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 12th October 2017
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 12th October 2017. [more]

New Zealand's deadliest day, 100 years on
Ceremonies marking the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Passchendaele were held throughout New Zealand. Veterans' Affairs Reporter Andrew McRae reports. [more]

Tramping battlefields brings home the reality of war
Navy officer Te Kani Te Wiata is in Belgium to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of Passchendaele, where his own great-grandfather was wounded, later dying of his injuries. [more]

NZ First refusing to say when it'll choose Govt
New Zealand First refuses to say when its board will make a decision on who it will enter Government with. Deputy Political Editor Chris Bramwell reports. [more]

4000 cows to be killed to prevent disease from spreading
Thousands of cows will be killed on farms around Oamaru as authorities try to contain the spread of the virulent disease mycoplasma bovis. They say they might never know the cause. [more]

Otago Uni putting 26 CCTV cameras on public student streets
The university says the controversial project, which is a first for New Zealand, is needed to combat rising crime, but some students say it's "creepy". [more]

Life in prison for grandmother who murdered toddler
Kathleen Cooper took on the care of her four grandchildren because she didn't want them split up. She was sentenced today to life behind bars for murdering one of them. Edward Gay reports. [more]

Blind community face barriers despite technology advancements
The blind community will soon have emails and e-books at their fingertips as innovators figure out ways to slash the cost of braille technology. [more]

Tiny homes mooted for small town's housing woes
Students are struggling to find affordable accommodation in Taumarunui, which has two tertiary providers. Could tiny homes be the solution? [more]

National ceremony a way to remember, pay respects
RNZ reporter Te Aniwa Hurihanganui was at the Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in Wellington to witness the national ceremony marking the 100th anniversary of Passchendaele. [more]

Police defend only having 18 fixed speed cameras
Police and the Automobile Association are downplaying the low number, but road safety charity Brake and the Police Association say speed cameras reduce drivers' speeds and save lives. [more]

Trump threatens to revoke licence of NBC news
US President Donald Trump says it's "disgusting" that reporters can publish whatever they want, after NBC reported he demanded a tenfold increase in the United States' nuclear arsenal. [more]

Club worried about restricted access to Tongariro Crossing
The Department of Conservation is to cut access to the car park at one end of the Tongariro Crossing in a bid to stop congestion on the Great Walk. [more]

Dateline Pacific

Cronulla Sharks aim to be number 1 in Pacific communities
The Cronulla Sharks National Rugby League team wants to become the "club of choice" for Pacific communities. The club hosted a breakfast on Tuesday to celebrate Fiji Day, which featured a host of key personnel and elders in the Fijian community in New South Wales and throughout Australia. [more]

Fight continues over giant Hawaiian telescope plan
Opponents of plans to build a giant telescope on a dormant volcano in Hawaii say they will keep fighting despite the project being given a green light. [more]

Samoa's national public inquiry into family violence ends
Testimonies given at Samoa's national commission inquiry into domestic violence will now be considered and compiled into a report that will eventually be tabled in parliament. The hearings, which ended last week, showed the problem is very real and on the rise, with an overwhelming consensus calling for action to be taken. [more]

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 12 October 2017
Samoa's national public inquiry into family violence ends; Fight continues over giant Hawaiian telescope plan; Manus Island to Nauru transfer offer 'shameful'; Dramatic drop in Pacific overstayer numbers to NZ; Cronulla Sharks aim to be "club of choice" in Pacific communities. [more]

Pacific - Arctic exchange boosts voices against climate change
There are hopes an exchange programme which led to three micronesian students exploring the artic circle around Canada and Greenland, will lead to a stronger global voice against climate change in the future. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 13 October 2017
Pacific - Arctic exchange could boost voices against climate change; Samoa's national public inquiry into family violence ends; Fight continues over giant Hawaiian telescope plan, and; Cronulla Sharks aim to be "club of choice" in Pacific communities. [more]

Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm

Climate change driving migration
The weather and climate is the most important factor in migration, ahead of even income and political freedom. Research here in New Zealand has found, for the first time, that the effects of climate change are not only driving people to move country but its actually the number one reason. Otago University economics researcher Dr Dennis Wesselbaum crunched the numbers of international migration figures to come to this conclusion. [more]

Helping the community after you're gone
There's a new way to give to charity that's gaining popularity, one that sets money aside especially for your community. Community foundations have been around in cities all over the world for years but it's only in the last decade or so they've taken off here. In Tauranga alone, there's a foundation that has $150 million coming to it - gifted from local people's Wills. We spoke to the man behind that foundation, local lawyer Bill Holland. [more]

Tom Larkin - supporting musicians with mental illness
New Zealand musician and music manager, Tom Larkin of the band Shihad has been spearheading efforts to provide support for musicians suffering mental health issues both here and in Australia where he is based. This lead to the creation of The New Zealand Music Foundation Wellbeing Service last year. Now the Australian music organisation Support Act has just announced it will launch a helpline there for those in the music industry in Australia who are experiencing mental health problems. [more]

Great album - I Put a Spell on You
Nina Simone's 1965 album 'I Put a Spell on You'. [more]

Tech talk with Paul Brislen
Paul talks about the privacy implications of hacked servers. Domino's New Zealand have been hacked and now customers are getting email spam. Should companies be forced to report such breaches? [more]

Dr Jess Berentson-Shaw
Dr Jess Berentson Shaw is a science researcher at the Morgan Foundation. Today she discusses how we measure poverty and whether there are better ways to do this. [more]

The history of video games in NZ
New Zealand's love affair with gaming started when Pong arrived in the '70s and changed forever when the PlayStation landed in '94, says historian Grant Morris. [more]

Short Story Club - October 12th
We discussed Yoot by Juliet Jackson with Mark Houlahan of Waikato University [more]

Tell me about your thesis
Mohamed Alansari tells us about his thesis titled Social-Psychological Factors and Tertiary Learning Environments: Student Perspectives, Measures and Influences. Mohamed developed a questionnaire for tertiary students and was able to create a model explaining why some students are more motivated and achieve more than others. [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 13 October 2017
A man who ripped off his friends for millions has been sent to prison. Challenging immigration detentions in Australia could cost thousands. [more]

Midday Sports News for 13 October 2017
The New Zealand driver Brendan Hartley is reportedly in contention to drive the US Formula One Grand Prix next week. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Friday 13 October 2017
The talks are over, the horse-trading's done and now we await a decision from New Zealand First on who will lead the next government. Overnight Belgium has been observing the 100-year anniversary of the first Battle of Passchendaele, considered one of the worst days in New Zealand's military history. An immigration professor in Queensland says it's quite possible the vigorous use of the law in the past few weeks marks the federal Government moving into a fresh, second phase of detentions and deportations. With 23 people now confirmed dead in Northern California's raging wildfires, fears are growing for a further 285 reported missing in Sonoma county alone. Ten years ago, with new anti-terrorism powers under their belt, police swooped on the people of Tuhoe in what has come to be known as the Urewera Raids.  [more]

Sports News for 13 October 2017
A update from the team at RNZ sport. [more]

Australia targets Kiwis for deportation with old law
An Australian immigration professor says Canberra may be moving into a second phase of its immigration crackdown. Lawyers and community groups in Queensland say many more visas are now being cancelled under a little-used law, called Section 116. Previously, a law called Section 501 has been used most often to detain and deport New Zealanders. Associate immigration professor Peter Billings of Queensland University told RNZ's Phil Pennington that what appears to be a change in strategy is hitting refugees and other non-citizens. [more]

Brexit talks stuck on citizens' rights, exit payment, Ireland
In Brussels, the European Union's chief Brexit negotiator says he won't be able to ask Europe's leaders to move on to the next stage of talks, because of a lack of progress. The fifth round of negotiations on the terms of Britain's exit from the bloc has ended in what the EU describes as a deadlock. Brussels correspondent Jack Parrock explains the sticking points to us. [more]

Coalition announcement up to a week away - Winston Peters
New Zealand First leader Winston Peters has promised the country will know the makeup of the government before the end of next week. The party's MPs will go into a full-day meeting today to weigh up the final offers from both National and Labour after five days of negotiations. The board's due to join them at a still unknown later date, and will also need to sign off on any agreement. Mr Peters fielded questions from reporters at the conclusion of all the meetings last night. [more]

Passchendaele: NZ's 'darkest day' remembered
Hundreds gathered at the Pukeahu National War Memorial in Wellington yesterday to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele. The battle claimed the lives of more than 800 New Zealand soldiers and wounded nearly two thousand - the highest casualty rate in New Zealand's military history in one day. One hundred years on the devastating loss was remembered and mourned by the Wellington community. [more]

Sports News for 13 October 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Govt coalition talks done, NZ waits for deal
The talks are over, the horse-trading's done and now we await a decision from New Zealand First on who will lead the next government. The party now has offers from National and Labour to consider - its MPs are meeting today to do so and the board will join them at a later date. It's not yet clear when an announcement will be made, but Winston Peters says it'll be before the end of next week. [more]

Coalition choice goes to NZ First's board
Coalition talks between NZ First, Labour and National have come to ended, and 'kingmaker' Winston Peters says he must consult the options with his party's board. The members of the board were only revealed to the public on Thursday following media scrutiny. Former NZ First deputy leader Peter Brown joins us to discuss the consultation process. [more]

Passchendaele: NZ Defence Force in Belgium
Overnight Belgium has been observing the 100-year anniversary of the first Battle of Passchendaele, considered one of the worst days in New Zealand's military history. The sunset ceremony at the Buttes New British Cemetery in Belgium has just finished. NZ Defence Force chief Lieutenant-General Tim Keating is there and joins us now. [more]

Scores of Kiwis caught up in old Australian law
Evidence is emerging that Australia has dusted off a draconian old law to begin a fresh mop-up of people it doesn't want, including scores of New Zealanders. An immigration professor in Queensland says it's quite possible the vigorous use of the law in the past few weeks marks the federal Government moving into a fresh, second phase of detentions and deportations. [more]

Doctors focus on fostering own health with oath
Burnt-out doctors in New Zealand are pushing for a major international change to put their own health on a par with that of their patients. The issue will come up tomorrow at a World Medical Association meeting in Chicago, and it's expected to be approved. [more]

California wildfires: Fears grow for hundreds missing
With 23 people now confirmed dead in Northern California's raging wildfires, fears are growing for a further 285 reported missing in Sonoma county alone. Firefighters - many of whom have lost their own homes to the blazes - are facing alarming conditions with gusty winds expected to strengthen by the weekend. US correspondent Mary MacCarthy is in Sonoma County's Santa Rosa, a city of 175,000 where entire neighbourhoods have been destroyed. "It's astonishing, by the end of the day if you're not wearing a mask you're coughing your lungs out," she told us. [more]

Urewera raids, 10 years on
Ten years ago, with new anti-terrorism powers under their belt, police swooped on the people of Tūhoe in what has come to be known as the Urewera Raids. They set up two unlawful road blocks in Ruatoki and Taneatua, detained innocent people and searched private property while hunting for people they believed were involved in military-style training camps in Te Urewera Ranges. [more]

Sports News for 13 October 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Winston Peters extends govt coalition deadline - analysis
New Zealand First leader Winston Peters has set another deadline for government talks, saying there will be a final decision and an announcement by the end of next week. NZ First has been meeeting alternately with National and Labour throughout the week, but the self-imposed deadline for deciding which party it would work with - Thursday night has come and gone. Mr Peters is also now working on bringing the party's board together, which could happen over the weekend. RNZ political editor Jane Patterson joins us with the latest analysis. [more]

Trump's chief of staff still in job 'unless things change'
Amid reports of a rift between himself and his president, Donald Trump's chief of staff John Kelly has told reporters he's not quitting, getting fired or firing anyone else, "unless things change". The retired Marine Corps general made the comment to reporters at today's daily White House briefing. General Kelly also spoke about Mr Trump's plans for the Iran nuclear deal and his executive order weakening the Obamacare health Act. US correspondent Simon Marks joins us with the details. [more]

Thousands of cows culled in mycoplasma bovis saga
The slaughter of thousands of cows to try to eradicate mycoplasma bovis once and for all has the backing of the farming community. The Ministry for Primary Industries has decided to kill about 4,000 cows across five infected properties, which are all owned by the Van Leeuwan Dairy Group. Federated Farmers president Katie Milne joins us. [more]

Carcinogenic chemicals leaching into NZ food - report
New research shows potentially cancer-causing chemicals from plastic and paper packaging are leaching into some foods sold in New Zealand. But the Ministry for Primary Industries says there are no food safety risks for consumers. [more]

Australia dual citizenship court cases unclear
The political future for seven Australian MPs embroiled in a dual citizenship saga remains unclear after three days of hearings. The High Court in Canberra has reserved its decision on whether they were invalidly elected - Australia's constitution stipulates MPs must not hold any citizenship other than Australian. ABC political reporter Matthew Doran tells us if the deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, who was found to be a New Zealander, is ruled ineligible, the government could lose its one-seat majority in parliament. [more]

Asteroid the size of a house flies over Antarctica
An asteroid the size of a house flew over Antarctica on Thursday night. More than a dozen observatories, universities and labs around the world were tracking the catchily named "2012 TC4" as it flew past. Dr Paul Chodas the manager of NASA's Centre for Near Earth Object Studies told me earlier that the fly-by provided them with the opportunity to test their asteroid-warning systems. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Cook Islands Maori for 13 October 2017
The latest news in Cook Islands Maori (Te Reo Maori Kuki Airani) - brought to you by our partner - Pacific Media Network. [more]

News in Samoan for 13 October 2017
The latest news in Samoan language (Gagana Samoa). [more]

News in Niuean for 13 October 2017
The latest news in Niuean language (Vagahau Niue) - brought to you by our partner - Pacific Media Network. [more]

News in Tongan for 13 October 2017
The latest news in Tongan language (Lea Faka-Tonga). [more]

Nights

Rice bags to Blankets
Denise Gibson of the Indian Cafe in Nelson is recycling the cafe's empty rice bags to raise money for a project providing blankets for people in India. [more]

South City Scoop
Photographer Raymond Sagapolutele is down in Wellington for a visit so he'll join Bryan in the studio to talk though the latest from South Auckland and Pacifica Culture. [more]

Nine To Noon

Kiwi doctor spearheads global change
An Auckland doctor's push to bring the mental health and well-being of medics to the forefront has led the World Medical Association to amend the Declaration of Geneva - the vow made by all doctors worldwide upon entering the profession. Sam Hazledine has been calling for change after looking into the "alarming" rates of stress, burnout and suicide, which he says has contributed to an increase in medical errors. Kathryn Ryan speaks to Dr Hazledine from Chicago, where the amendment is expected to be ratified at an international meeting on Saturday 14th October. [more]

Parents want more life skills taught at school
New Zealand parents want their children to be taught life skills as part of their education, however cultural influences, location and income all play a role in parental expectations of their child's academic success, according to a new study from the education funder, ASG and Monash University. Kathryn Ryan talks to Melanie Webber, who teaches at Auckland's Western Springs College, & is the Vice President of the PPTA & ASG's CEO John Velegrinis. [more]

100 reasons why - new national art gallery
Te Papa's revamped gallery space is to be called Toi Art, opening in March 2018. A taster for the new exhibition, in the form of a book promising a fresh approach to art appreciation, Ten x Ten: Art at Te Papa invites ten curators to each pick ten of their favourite works from the over-all collection and explain why they resonate. Ten x Ten Editor and Curator of Photography at Te Papa Athol McCredie tells Kathryn Ryan about the new book. [more]

Asia correspondent Anna Fifield
This week a lawmaker in Seoul claimed that North Korean hackers had broken into the South Korean military's intranet and had stolen a huge trove of documents. What did they steal? China's Xi Jinping prepares for an important week amid signs he's been cleaning house before the big convention by purging key military officials, and scientists have figured out what makes durian smell so bad. New Zealander Anna Fifield is The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tokyo. [more]

Revolutionising education for the world's poorest children
Bridge International Academies is attempting to fix the global education crisis in some of the most impoverished places on the planet. It's a chain of inexpensive private schools with the backing of tech giants Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg. Bridge operates over 500 schools and educates more than 100,000 children in India, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria and Uganda. Through the use of technology it streamlines school administration, delivers lessons plan to teachers, facilitates classroom management and track the progress of both teachers and students in real time. Kathryn Ryan speaks with Bridge's Chief Academic Officer Sean Geraghty. [more]

Book review - Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan
Jane Westaway reviews 'Manhattan Beach' by Jennifer Egan, published by Hachette NZ. [more]

New Music with Jeremy Taylor
New releases from Oasis singer Liam Gallagher and Beck have a common hand on the production tiller, while former Fur Patroller Julia Deans releases her first new music in seven years. [more]

Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
The crucial intercontinental play-off matches (home and away) involving the All Whites and Peru, and English cricket's governing body considers a proposal that in theory could end rain interrupting play. [more]

The week that was with Te Radar and Alice Brine
A lighter look at the week, including why, if you're planning on parking your car at the start of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing in order to hike the 19km trail, you will have to work really hard on your fitness. Hikers will have only four hours to do the 19km trail through the national park as parking restrictions come into force. [more]

Our Changing World

Drug discoverer recognised with a top science honour
The 2017 MacDiarmid Medal has been awarded to chemist Peter Tyler, for his work designing and creating new drugs to treat diseases such as cancer. [more]

ECLIPSE - getting ready for a supervolcano eruption
An $8-million research programme to better understand the Taupo supervolcano and prepare the community for an eruption has just begun. [more]

Top science award goes to a 'supervolcanologist'
The 2017 Rutherford Prize has been awarded to Victoria University of Wellington geologist Colin Wilson for his work on supervolcanoes such as Taupo. [more]

Pacific Correspondent

Pacific Correspondent for 12 October 2017
We hear from our correspondent in American Samoa. [more]

Rural News

Morning Rural News for 13 October 2017
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Midday Rural News for 13 October 2017
News from the rural and farming sectors. [more]

The Long Way Home

The Long Way Home - Coming Soon!
Whenua, whakapapa, whanau. In a new podcast series available from 16 October, Bruce Hopkins walks Te Araroa to take his father and brother's ashes back home to Stewart Island. Here's a quick taste. [more]

The Panel

One Quick Question for 12 October 2017
Indian place names, toilet bowls and the price of vegies. [more]

The Panel pre-show for 12 October 2017
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. [more]

The Panel with Catherine Robertson and David Farrar (Part 1)
Jonathan Boston of Victoria University on whether a delay in forming a coalition is actually a sign of a healthy democracy. Passchendaele resurgence in the public conscience. US comedian and actor Seth McFarlane explains why he made a dig about Harvey Weinstein at the Oscars back in 2013. It's not new but there's been another call to get rid of alcohol in supermarkets. [more]

The Panel with Catherine Robertson and David Farrar (Part 2)
Paul Sorrell of the Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust discusses the suffering of conscientious objectors and how their stance influenced New Zealand society. What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and David Farrar want to talk about. The school holidays can mean even more time and financial strain on parents. Traffic lawyer Steve Cullen says Bashford Antiques could charge anything they like to unclamp illegally parked cars. Shockwaves are resounding throughout the American Scout movement at the idea of allowing girls to join. Long-serving Scout - and today's Panelist - David Farrar provides and insider's view of the Scouts. [more]

Is coalition delay a good sign?
Jonathan Boston of Victoria University on whether a delay in forming a coalition is actually a sign of a healthy democracy. [more]

Remembering Passchendaele
Passchendaele resurgence in the public conscience. [more]

Seth McFarlane explains his 2013 Weinstein dig
US comedian and actor Seth McFarlane explains why he made a dig about Harvey Weinstein at the Oscars back in 2013. [more]

Supermarket alcohol ban
It's not new but there's been another call to get rid of alcohol in supermarkets. [more]

WW1 pacifist suffering
Paul Sorrell of the Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust discusses the suffering of conscientious objectors and how their stance influenced New Zealand society. [more]

Panel Says
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and David Farrar want to talk about. [more]

Not a holiday for parents
The school holidays can mean even more time and financial strain on parents. [more]

$760 wheel clamp
Traffic lawyer Steve Cullen says Bashford Antiques could charge anything they like to unclamp illegally parked cars. [more]

US Scouts not dib-dibbing over girls
Shockwaves are resounding throughout the American Scout movement at the idea of allowing girls to join. Long-serving Scout - and today's Panelist - David Farrar provides and insider's view of the Scouts. [more]

The Wireless

Comment: A celebration of social experiments
Yesterday former broadcaster Sean Plunket did a social experiment, which prompted us to come up with this list of other fun social experiments. [more]

Waiting for Winston
Why is he taking so long, Māni Dunlop wonders. [more]

Upbeat

Pianist adds fusion to Auckland Jazz Fest
Belgium pianist Jef Neve is bringing his jazz fusion music to the Auckland Jazz Festival this week. He’s currently touring Australia and New Zealand with his jazz trio combined with a string quartet playing original material. His latest CD has featured on the Belgian pop charts all year; the high class playing sits easily within pop, jazz and contemporary classical genre. [more]

Satirical swing by Andrew London Trio
Music should be fun, and the Andrew London Trio puts the enjoyment into it with their original arrangements. The trio is half way through a national wide tour as part of Arts on Tour NZ taking in 23 venues. Nothing is out of reach for the group who cover everything from the shearing shed of Southland to male insecurities presented with a folk, blues, country and hip hop vibe and some 1940’s swing. [more]

New Organ concerto for AYO
The Auckland Youth Orchestra, along with soloist Rebecca Lee is on the road performing an organ concerto written especially for them.  Composer John Wells has created the work for Rebecca to play either on digital or pipe organ. He explains the technicalities and why Lee was the perfect soloist and what organ associations are doing to attract the next generation to this music. [more]

World & Pacific News

2pm Pacific Regional News for 12 October 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

4pm Pacific Regional News for 12 October 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

6am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

7am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

11am World, Pacific and Sports News for 13 October 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

News stories:

Naki keep hold of Shield
Taranaki will keep the Ranfurly Shield until 2018 after beating challengers Manawatu 46-25 in a high-scoring affair in New Plymouth tonight. [more]

Diamonds dominate Silver Ferns to take series
The Australian netballers have won the Constellation Cup for the fifth year in a row with a convincing 55-43 win over New Zealand in the third test in Adelaide. [more]

Coalition talks to be done by tonight
It's crunch time for Winston Peters as he pushes into the final day of talks over forming a new government, and he says today will be the most substantive yet. [more]

NZ A downed by India
The New Zealand A cricketers have suffered a crushing six wicket loss to India A in the third one-dayer in Vishakapatnam. [more]

Seasonal outlook for Pacific cyclone season released
With tropical cyclone season approaching, the Fiji Met Service has released its annual seasonal outlook for its area of responsibility in the Pacific. [more]

High prices push bakers to use French butter
The rising cost of butter and other dairy products is hitting bakeries and other small food businesses hard, the Baking Industry Association says. [more]

Australian team bus attack arrests
Two people have reportedly been arrested for throwing a rock at the Australian cricket team's bus after their T20 victory over India in Guwahati. [more]

Pitfalls of steel company's import strategy
A New Zealand company's strategy of importing cheap but high-quality steel from China has contributed to its undoing, industry players say. [more]

Japan steel scandal sparks car, train checks
Toyota, Nissan and Honda are among companies checking whether they have used any substandard product from Japan's third-largest steel manufacturer. [more]

Stokes slips deeper into trouble
Under-fire England all-rounder Ben Stokes has apologised to British model Katie Price and her disabled son Harvey after a video emerged of him impersonating the pair. [more]

Nadal and Federer line up again
Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer resumed their battle for the year-end No.1 ranking with crushing victories to reach the third round of the Shanghai Tennis Masters. [more]

Akl airport: All international flights delayed last night
More than 1000 passengers had to be rescreened at Auckland Airport, causing long lines, after a body scanner lost power last night. [more]

Black Sticks pile up points against PNG
The New Zealand women's hockey team have made light work of Papua New Guinea with a 33-0 result in their opening game at the Oceania Cup in Sydney. [more]

Tahiti drug runners unaware of cargo
The public prosecutor in French Polynesia said sailors who had 500 kilogrammes of cocaine hidden in their catamaran claim they didn't know. [more]

Passchendaele: 100 years since NZ's darkest day
Officially 843 New Zealanders died and over 1700 were wounded in just the first few hours of October 12th 1917. Andrew McRae's grandfather fought in the battle and wrote about his experience. [more]

Teaching the homeless to build new homes
He Korowai Trust in the Far North, which has been housing the homeless, has won a $2 million grant to set up the Sweet-As Academy to teach trades to people who have not had formal education. [more]

Speed cameras missing in most of NZ
Only 18 of 56 planned digital speed cameras are operating, and are limited to urban areas, as the road toll continues to rise compared to recent years. [more]

Catalonia: Spain takes step towards direct rule
The government in Madrid has given Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont five days to say whether or not he has declared independence, Spanish news agency Efe reports. [more]

NZ grants residence to trans woman abused in UK
A trans woman from the UK has been granted residence on humanitarian grounds after suffering years of abuse and violence in Britain. [more]

Defections will motivate Kiwis
Kangaroos backrower Matt Gillett reckons New Zealand will be more dangerous than ever at the Rugby League World Cup despite losing high-profile stars to Tonga. [more]

Sport: Honduras U17s too strong for New Caledonia
New Caledonia have been beaten 5-0 by Honduras in their second match at the Under 17 Men's World Cup in India. [more]

Lowest Sept house sales in six years - REINZ
House prices remain little changed and the numbers being sold are at a six-year low, with the Real Estate Institute saying the market is expected to remain cool. [more]

California fires: Scores missing as death toll rises
More than 380 people are still missing as wildfires that killed more than a dozen people have ravaged northern California's wine region. [more]

Lawyer urges independent benefit reviews
The benefit decision review committee is part of an internal Ministry of Social Development system and creates a systemic bias against beneficiaries, community lawyer Simonette Boele says. [more]

Scotland name rookies in World Cup team
Scotland have named seven uncapped players in their World Cup squad including young Warriors forward and Maori representative James Bell. [more]

Outburst costs Italian tennis player $135 000
Italian tennis player Fabio Fognini has been provisionally suspended for two grand slam tournaments and fined $135,000 for his outburst at this year's US Open. [more]

IPCA rebukes police over interaction with jogger's killer
The police watchdog has criticised police for their dealings with a man who fatally stabbed Joanne Pert while she was out on a morning run in Auckland last year. [more]

Who's deciding: NZ First board list revealed
With a final day of coalition meetings under way at Parliament, close scrutiny is being given to members of the NZ First board who will sign off the winning deal. [more]

New Balance pull plug on Stokes contract
Under-fire England all-rounder Ben Stokes has had his contract with New Balance terminated as his off-field problems snowball. [more]

'I got sick. I lost my daughter, I lost my moko'
Methamphetamine users have shared harrowing tales about the personal cost of their battle with addiction at an anti-P rally in Whanganui. [more]

World Cup exit won't torpedo US broadcast plans
The failure of the United States men's team to qualify for next year's World Cup will not impact on Fox Sports' plans to televise the tournament in the US. [more]

'An amazing mum': Mourners honour Taupō crash victim
The Tongan community in Palmerston North are mourning the loss of a mum, teacher and recently ordained preacher who was killed in a horror crash. [more]

Weaving tutor passes torch to Pākehā students
A Pukekohe weaving tutor is encouraging her Pākehā students to ensure weaving skills are kept alive. [more]

Watchdog group takes back high Auckland rates claim
A ratepayer watchdog group in Auckland admits it was wrong to say the city has the second highest rates in the country. [more]

Diamonds set sights on Cup clean sweep
The quest for just the second Constellation Cup clean sweep will drive Australia in the final match of the netball series in Sydney on Saturday. [more]

Kubica poised for F1 return
Polish Formula One driver Robert Kubica has completed a one-day test with Williams at Silverstone as he pushes for a comeback after a seven- year absence. [more]

Annabelle Sheehan to head NZ Film Commission
Annabelle Sheehan has been chief executive of the South Australian Film Commission since 2015. [more]

Food prices rise as butter up
Record prices for butter have pushed up the overall cost of food in the last year. [more]

160 jobs to go at Otago University
Otago University has confirmed it will cut 160 full-time support staff jobs. [more]

'Speed cameras are just one tool' - police
Police and the Automobile Association say road safety comes down to the way people drive, and other tools than speed cameras for reducing risks are more effective. [more]

Bad weather stops PM's visit to Maewo evacuees
Heavy rain and bad weather have prevented dignitaries visiting evacuees on the Vanuatu island of Maewo. [more]

'Huge progress' on coalition talks - Peters
Following his meeting with National this morning, New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said "huge progress" was being made, but he refused to go into detail about which policy areas were being discussed. [more]

No government announcement by Thursday
New Zealand First will not reveal who it has chosen to form a government with by its self-imposed Thursday deadline. [more]

Gorge replacement timeframe too long - mayors
Local mayors are unhappy with the time it will take to replace the Manawatu Gorge road. [more]

Black Friday coalition? Not likely
Power Play - Superstitious or not, tomorrow doesn't augur well for the announcement of a new government, RNZ's Political Editor Jane Patterson writes. [more]

Isner returning to Auckland
The two-time American champion John Isner is returning to the ASB Tennis Classic in Auckland in 2018. [more]

PNG Police Minister targets illegal arms build-up
Papua New Guinea's police minister says the government is aiming to strengthen laws to prevent the build-up of illegal weapons. [more]

Illegal gambling operator in French Polynesia sentenced and fined
The operator of an illegal gambling establishment in French Polynesia has been given a two-year jail sentence and fined $US150,000. [more]

Petition withdrawn amidst lingering PNG election unrest
Deteriorating unrest in Southern Highlands province has prompted the withdrawal of a petition against the recent election victory of Papua New Guinea's prime minister. [more]

American Samoa joins US climate change Alliance
American Samoa's governor Lolo Moliga has pledged support for the intent of the Paris Agreement on climate change and is backing the United States Climate Alliance. [more]

Vanuatu signs $US15.1 million project to increase renewable energy
The ADB and Vanuatu have signed an agreement for a $US15.1 million project to increase the availability of renewable energy on Malekula and Espiritu Santo. [more]

Five more people in custody in French Polynesia drug probe
Police in French Polynesia have taken a further five people into custody in an ongoing probe of a methamphetamine distribution network. [more]

Sport: PNG hockey teams thumped at Oceania Cup
The Papua New Guinea men's and women's hockey teams have been crushed in their opening games at the Oceania Cup in Sydney. [more]

Cooks gets sanitation aid from EU
A financing agreement to support the Cook Islands' sanitation sector has been signed in Malta. [more]

Sport: New major sponsor for Fiji Rugby
The Fiji Rugby Union is heralding "a new era" after announcing Fiji Airways as their new major sponsor on a five year deal. [more]

Alleged cocaine smugglers to be tried in Tahiti
The public prosecutor in French Polynesia says the men caught with 500 kilogrammes of cocaine last weekend will be tried in Papeete. [more]

French mission to New Caledonia defended
A New Caledonia politician has defended the planned mission of the French National Assembly ahead of the territory's independence referendum. [more]

Cook Islands and Malta establish diplomatic ties
The Cook Islands and Malta have established formal diplomatic relations. [more]

Tsunami drill for Samoan schools
Six schools on a vulnerable coastline of Samoa hit by the deadly 2009 Pacific tsunami are due to hold an evacuation drill this morning. [more]

Samoa summit promotes breadfruit products
There are hopes a breadfruit summit in Samoa will lead to greater commerical consumption of the crop. [more]

Arctic - Pacific exchange to explore cultural links
An environmental scientist hopes a new exchange programme between Arctic communities and islands in Micronesia will lead to a stronger voice against climate change. [more]

Next Tongan govt urged to invest in mental health
The head of an NGO in Tonga says the next government will need to increase its investment in mental health services. [more]

Australia 'scrambling' on Manus Island
A human rights lawyer says Australia is scrambling to find places to move Manus Island detainees as its Papua New Guinea detention centre is closed. [more]

Myanmar forces killed, tortured and raped - UN report
Myanmar security forces conducted "clearance operations" to brutally drive out half a million Muslims into neighbouring Bangladesh, a UN report says. [more]

NZ model: I would testify against Weinstein
A New Zealand model says she would give evidence against Harvey Weinstein in court. [more]

Urgent BSA meeting over Plunket tweet
A tweet by former broadcaster Sean Plunket about producer Harvey Weinstein has prompted an urgent meeting of the Broadcasting Standards Authority. [more]

'Heartache' as ministry orders culling of 4000 cattle
About 4000 cattle will be culled on farms infected with the disease Mycoplasma bovis, the Ministry for Primary Industries says. [more]

Asteroid to pass within Moon's orbit
An asteroid the size of a house is set to pass over Antarctica early this evening. [more]

Slips close rail line near Kaikōura
A recently re-opened rail link between Blenheim and Christchurch has been temporarily closed by slips near Kaikōura. [more]

Consumer confidence eases
Consumer confidence has eased slightly in the past month, but is generally holding up in the face of a slowing housing market and political uncertainty. [more]

Taupō crash victims named
Police have released the names of all four people who died in a head-on smash just north of Taupō on Tuesday. [more]

Latham spins his way down to middle order
Tom Latham's ability against spin will see him make a return to the middle of the batting order for the New Zealand cricket team's one day series in India. [more]

Hacker 'Alf' stole Aus defence data
Minister announced breach days ago [more]

Otago University goes ahead with CCTV plan
Otago University will install two dozen security cameras on Dunedin streets in an effort to curb crime by and against students. [more]

Passchendaele commemorations held nationwide
Services to mark the centenary of the WWI battle where more than 800 men died within hours have been held around the country. [more]

Life imprisonment for woman who killed grandson
A grandmother who murdered her two-year-old grandson after throwing him down a hallway has been sentenced to life in prison. [more]

Pair charged with fraud over disappearing $1m
Two trustees of a Māori-owned forest in the Far North have been charged with a million-dollar fraud. [more]

Samoa agriculture ministry starts chicken breeding farm to reduce imports
Samoa's Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries has launched an import substitution project with a chicken breeding farm. [more]

Hawaii telescope project still being fought
The fight to stop the construction of giant telescope on a dormant volcano in Hawai'i looks set to head to the Supreme Court. [more]

Big plans for Taumarunui tiny houses
Tiny houses are being trialled in a King Country town as a solution to a shortage of student accommodation and work for tradies. [more]

Historical Māori pā discovered in Tauranga
The search for a new museum site in Tauranga has unearthed evidence of a historical Māori pā and war trenches. [more]

French Polynesia election dates approved
The next French Polynesian election is set to go ahead in two rounds in April and May. [more]

Solomons to make solar panels - a Pacific first
Solomon Islands will soon have its own solar panel manufacturing plant. [more]

Elderly woman feared killed by crocodile
Australian police say they believe human remains have been found near a crocodile-infested creek in far north Queensland. [more]

Winds fan 'catastrophic' US wildfires
Strong winds are fanning "catastrophic" wildfires that have killed at least 23 people in northern California, the state fire chief says. [more]

Captive orca suffer killer toothache - study
Captive orca are suffering serious tooth damage from biting steel bars and concrete, new research involving New Zealand scientists has found. [more]

Palestinian factions reach agreement - Hamas
The Palestinian group Hamas says it has reached an agreement with rival group Fatah, ending a decade-long rift. [more]

NZ First wraps back-to-back meetings
New Zealand First has wrapped up its final meeting with Labour, ending five days of back-to-back meetings with the two major parties. [more]