Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 30th November 2017

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Business News, Checkpoint, Dateline Pacific, Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, Late Edition, Midday Report, Morning Report, News Extras, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nights, Nine To Noon, Our Changing World, Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time, Podcast Classics, Rural News, The House On Demand, The Lost, The Panel, The Wireless, Upbeat, World & Pacific News

Business News

Evening Business for 30 November 2017
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Early Business News for 1 December 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Business News for 1 December 2017
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Markets Update for 1 December 2017
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Terms of trade hit record high
The strength in dairy and meat prices have driven the country's trade position to an historic high. [more]

NZ banks should escape fall out from Aust banking inquiry
The New Zealand operations of the major Australian banks may come under scrutiny as a result of the royal commission that is to enquire into the industry across the Tasman. [more]

Midday Markets for 1 December 2017
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at FNZC. [more]

Business briefs
The clothing retailer, Hallenstein Glasson, says it's had a positive start to the summer season with first quarter sales 15 percent ahead of last year. [more]

Checkpoint

Checkpoint with John Campbell for Thursday 30th November 2017
Watch Thursday's full programme here. [more]

No charges to be laid over CTV building collapse - police
Detective Superintendent Peter Read says there is not enough evidence to prosecute someone over the CTV building collapse during the February 22, 2011 earthquake. [more]

'There’s no justice in this world….it’s not right' - CTV survivor
Maryanne Jackson says New Zealand needs to pass a law over corporate manslaughter, because there's been no justice for the 115 CTV victims. She vows to continue to fight. [more]

Father of CTV victim pleased at no prosecution over collapse
David Beaumont's son Matty Beaumont died in the CTV building. He says it would've been unfair to single out one person, because too many people were involved. [more]

CTV victims' husband disappointed at police decision
Richard Austin has mixed emotions about the police decision not to prosecute over the CTV collapse. He tells John Campbell he's sad no one has been held accountable, but is satisfied with the investigation. [more]

CTV collapse should have gone to trial - Nigel Hampton
Richard Austin has mixed emotions about the police decision not to prosecutve over the CTV collapse. He tells John Campbell he's sad no one has been held accountable, but is satisfied with the investigation. [more]

Neither Audit NZ or Waikato DHB have spoken to Nigel Murray
Audit NZ says it's been unable to establish the true extent of former Waikato DHB boss Nigel Murray's excessive travel costs because of holes in the paper trail. [more]

Phil Goff wants to raise rates by 6.2 percent
Auckland councillors have called for more notice to be taken of those who will be hit hardest by proposed changes to the rating system after the mayor announced a shake-up of how the city funds growth. [more]

War criminal Slobodan Praljak dies after taking poison in court
A Bosnian Croat wartime commander has died after swallowing poison in a UN war crimes courtroom after losing an appeal against a 20-year prison sentence. Reuters' Rosanna Philpott reports. [more]

Figures reveal Wellington region traffic slows
New figures confirm what Wellington motorists already knew - it's taking longer to drive in and around the capital, despite millions of dollars being spent to improve the roads. [more]

Jimmy's Pies back to selling 20,000 a day
Iconic pie-maker Jimmy's Pies is back in business after the Roxburgh floods closed the bakery for three days. [more]

Biker kid cruises ahead of competition
At the start of the year, Johnloyd Turua, 7 could hardly ride a bike. He's since beaten dozens of kids who race BMX bikes regularly. [more]

CTV victims’ family wanted a trial into building’s collapse
Tim Elms' daughter Teresa McLean worked as a nurse at the CTV building, and was killed when it collapsed. He spoke to John Campbell from the site. [more]

‘We shouldn’t have been in there’ - CTV collapse survivor
Kendyll Lamont and her children were on the top floor of the CTV building when it collapsed. She said the building should never have been built, and no one should have ever been allowed inside it. [more]

Canterbury TV chairman had no concerns over CTV building safety
Nick Smith was the Canterbury Television chairman when the CTV building collapsed. He was the sole survivor of 17 staff members. He spoke to John Campbell. [more]

Businesses consider passing on Auckland fuel tax to customers
Tradies and small businesses are fretting about the impact of Auckland's 10 cent a litre fuel tax. [more]

Mounting frustration among slip affected businesses in Birkenhead
Frustrated business owners on Auckland's North Shore are worried that a major slip that swallowed a piece of machinery could be coming for their buildings next. [more]

RNZ Checkpoint with John Campbell, Friday 1st December 2017
Watch Friday's full programme here [more]

Dateline Pacific

Bougainville wants answers from PNG at meeting next month
The President of Bougainville, John Momis, says he will want answers from the Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O'Neill when they meet next month. [more]

Pacific police urged to apply strict zero tolerance to violence
Civil society organisations working with survivors of gender-based violence in the Pacific are urging police in the region to apply zero tolerance approaches to gender based violence. [more]

Fiji authorities worried about child suicide increase
Fiji police have made a public appeal to parents to keep their children safe over the school holiday period after the deaths of four children last week. [more]

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 30 November 2017
Fiji police appeal to parents to keep their children safe over the school holiday period after the deaths of four children last week; Civil society organisations working with survivors of gender-based violence in the Pacific are urging police in the region to apply zero tolerance approaches to gender based violence; The President of Bougainville, John Momis, says he will want answers from the Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O'Neill when they meet next month; Calls mount in PNG for those who tortured a six year old girl for sorcery to come forward; Vanuatu's opposition leader says the government has conceded the country's interests too readily to satisfy international requirements over its tax haven status. [more]

Tahiti athletes under neutral banner at Mini Games
The Tahiti flag will not fly at next month's Pacific Mini Games in Vanuatu. [more]

Prominent doctors call for access to Manus Island refugees
Prominent Australian doctors have asked for permission to go to Manus Island to care for refugees. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 1 December 2017
Prominent Australian doctors have asked for permission to go to Manus Island to care for refugees; Fiji police appeal to parents to keep their children safe over the school holiday period after the deaths of four children last week; Civil society organisations working with survivors of gender-based violence in the Pacific are urging police in the region to apply zero tolerance approaches to gender based violence; The President of Bougainville, John Momis, says he will want answers from the Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O'Neill when they meet next month; the Tahiti flag will not fly at next month's Pacific Mini Games in Vanuatu [more]

Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm

California country singer, Sam Outlaw in session
Sam Outlaw is a former advertising executive turned country music star. He's in New Zealand for the first time and will perform tonight at Spark Arena in Auckland. He performs our first song live in studio with Jesse. [more]

What to flush and what not to flush
An Aucklander was hit with a huge clean-up job this week after a neighbour flushed nappies and wet wipes down the toilet. Watercare's Peter Rogers reminds us what it's safe and not safe to flush. [more]

Ecostore's Malcolm Rands on energy poverty
Ecostore founder Malcolm Rands is one of the well-known New Zealanders supporting a campaign to give energy-efficient light bulbs to Kiwis who struggle to pay the power bill. [more]

22 years of Shark Week
We talked earlier this week about snakes needing a PR makeover, like sharks have had in the last few years. One of the ways sharks are celebrated is on Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week. [more]

Great album: Billy Bragg, Talking with the Taxman About Poetry
Talking with the Taxman About Poetry is the third album by British singer songwriter, Billy Bragg. [more]

Tech talk with Paul Brislen
Paul discusses Sky TV's move to get ISP's to block certain websites. [more]

Your Money with Mary Holm
How to best deal with a student loan. [more]

Short Story Club
Today we will talk about two poems, Mute Song by Kate Camp and Seven Unposted Postcards to my Brother by Geoff Cochran. [more]

Tell me about your thesis
Dr Kyle Eggleton tells us anout his thesis looking at the waiting room experience of patients in GP waiting rooms as part of his Masters in Public Health. He says some interesting results emerged. [more]

Late Edition

Late Edition for 30 November 2017
The campaign to save an urban marae. On-line child sex abuse - supporting the partners of offenders and in Dateline Pacific - Fiji police are appealing to parents to keep their children safe after deaths of four youngsters in the last week. [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 1 December 2017
Myrtle Rust arrives in Wellington and the most common contraception pill is being rationed. [more]

Midday Sports News for 1 December 2017
The England bowler James Anderson says the arrival of Ben Stokes in New Zealand isn't disrupting his sides preparation for the second Ashes Test which starts in Adelaide tomorrow. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Friday 1 December 2017
Dismay over police decision on CTV prosecution; CTV collapse: will there be corporate manslaughter charge?; Trump to fire Tillerson - reports; NCEA, scholarship exams finish; scientist warns extinction looming for kauri; bottled water tax hampered by trade agreements; mass surveillance of NZ active longer than Key claimed. [more]

Sports News for 1 December 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

CTV collapse prompts tougher engineering rules
The industry body for engineers says they've put new measures in place since the CTV building collapse to ensure dodgy engineering is reported. Yesterday, after a three-year investigation, police said there was not enough evidence to justify laying criminal charges against the engineers who designed it. Engineering New Zealand says changes made since 2011 include the obligation to take action if engineers come across any poor engineering that endangered the public. [more]

Wellington rail strike off, but trouble looms in Auckland
Today's planned strike by Wellington train workers may be off but is strike action looming in Auckland? Late on Thursday the Wellington union achieved a breakthrough when rail company, Transdev said it would no longer demand cuts to weekend shift payments. In Auckland a dispute is brewing over Transdev wanting to run passenger trains with just a single worker on board - the driver. Eighty-four percent of union members have voted to strike if the demand's not dropped. Rail and Maritime Transport Union health and safety organiser Karen Fletcher told RNZ reporter Eric Frykberg it's not safe to have no staff on board. [more]

'Apathy, stupidity' will cause Kauri extinction
A distinguished NZ scientist is warning that kauri are heading for extinction because of public apathy and stupidity. Professor Peter de Lange was for 27 years a principal research scientist with DoC and chairs the New Zealand panel that decides which plants will go on the international red list of plants facing extinction. Dr de Lange says it's the pig-headed behaviour of supposed nature-lovers who won't wash their shoes and stick to the tracks, that's led to the doubling of kauri dieback in the Waitakere ranges in the past five years. [more]

Sports News for 1 December 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Dismay over police decision on CTV prosecution
There's been widespread dismay at the decision not to prosecute anyone for the deaths of 115 people in the CTV building collapse during the 2011 Canterbury earthquake. Police say it was a tough decision - they wanted to hold someone to account but there simply wasn't the evidence to warrant a prosecution. [more]

CTV collapse: Will there be corporate manslaughter charge?
Justice Minister Andrew Little said on Thursday that "everybody involved in this has walked away scot-free. And that's not right." Nigel Hampton QC, who was counsel for the families at the Royal Commission in to the Canterbury earthquakes, joins us to discuss the outcome. [more]

Trump to fire Tillerson - reports
With the US dealing with a North Korean ballistic missile test and deteriorating relations with the UK over President Trump's retweeting of far right anti-Muslim videos, it's now being reported the US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson may be on the way out. His replacement, according to multiple sources spoken to by CNN is likely to be CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Washington correspondent Harry Horton joins us with the details. [more]

Scientist warns extinction looming for kauri
A prominent New Zealand scientist says kauri are heading for extinction because of public stupidity. Dr Peter de Lange a principal research scientist with the Department for Conservation for many years, says the big trees are dying because people refuse to believe they are spreading the disease that kills them. [more]

NCEA, scholarship exams finish
The end of this year's NCEA and Scholarship exams is in sight with the final nine exams scheduled to take place today. The annual exam season began three-and-a-half weeks ago and it's been relatively trouble-free apart from complaints about the level one maths papers. There are nine exams on Friday including level two Samoan this morning and level one Spanish this afternoon. [more]

Bottled water tax hampered by trade agreements
It's back to the drawing board for the government's plans to whack a tax on bottled water exports after revelations it would breach some free trade deals. National says it's another embarassment for the new Labour-led government, highlighting just how disorganised it is. [more]

Mass surveillance of NZ active longer than Key claimed
Official papers have revealed Sir John Key's story of when he scrapped a mass surveillance programme, and why, doesn't quite stack up. The papers, obtained by the NZ Herald, show the development of the 'Speargun' project actually continued beyond the time Sir John said he ordered the programme to stop. The reporter who broke this story is David Fisher. [more]

Family group conferences failing to prioritse hapu
The Childrens Commissioner says Maori families are being let down by a system designed to help at-risk children and young offenders. A report by his office has found family group conferences have failed to fully involve hapu and iwi, and the services have been patchy and inconsistent. Commissioner Andrew Becroft says the system is under-resourced and needs significant change and improvement. [more]

Maori let down by system - Children's Commissioner
Children's Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft says the family group conference system is under resourced and needs significant change and improvement. [more]

Franklin Road lights celebrate 25 years of festivity
Christmas tree vendors are popping up everywhere, cherries are back in season, and dubious Christmas albums are being dusted off at every shopping mall around the country. In Auckland the residents of Franklin Rd have been hard at work readying their lights with this festive season marking their 25th year of bringing a sparkle to the night. [more]

Black Caps summer of cricket gets underway
A busy summer of cricket begins for the Black Caps today when the first test against the West Indies begins at the Basin Reserve in Wellington. New Zealand will play 27 matches between now and the end of March but just four of them will be tests - the remainder are one dayers and Twenty20 games. The season is bookended by tests with two against the Windies and two against England. [more]

Sports News for 1 December 2017
An update from the team at RNZ Sport. [more]

Quake engineering boss Peter Smith on CTV decision
Queen's Counsel Nigel Hampton, who represented some of the families of those who died in the CTV building, believes the decision not to prosecute the building's engineers was not warranted, and that a prosecution could have succeeded under the existing law. Documents show police abandoned a prosecution even though engineers told them it was clear that substandard design caused it. President of the Society for Earthquake Engineering Peter Smith joins us with his reaction to the decision. [more]

Govt's spending plans 'going to take discipline' - Robertson
Finance Minister Grant Robertson has ordered every minister to review their portfolios, to make sure all money being spent fits with the strategy of the new government. Mr Robertson delivered his first major speech as Finance Minister in Auckland. He's said "it's going to take discipline" RNZ political editor Jane Patterson tells us. [more]

Polytech gets worst ever quality rating
For the first time ever, the Qualifications Authority has given a government polytechnic its lowest possible quality rating. Tai Poutini Polytechnic, which is based in Greymouth, has been downgraded to a category four institution because of serious deficiencies in its managment and governance. The previous government gave the institute a $3.6 million bailout earlier this year and last year put it under the control of a Crown manager. RNZ education correspondent John Gerritsen explains the details. [more]

UK PM criticises Trump's retweets
The Mayor of London Sadiq Khan says there should be no official UK visit for the US President. This comes after Donald Trump retweeted inflammatory videos from British far-right group Britain First. The videos show people, claimed to be Muslims, kicking a boy on crutches and smashing a statue of the Virgin Mary. When UK Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the US President for posting the videos, Mr Trump told her to mind her own business. Correspondent in Washington DC Julian Borger joins us with the latest. [more]

Free trade rules disrupt bottled water tax plans
It's back to the drawing board for the government's plans to tax bottled water exports after revelations it would breach some free trade deals. A national petition signed by more than 15,000 people demanding a halt to exports of water was presented to Parliament earlier this year. It was organised by the 'Bung the Bore' campaign, a group set up when the Ashburton District Council tried to sell land with a water consent to a bottled water company. Organiser Jen Branje joins us with her reaction. [more]

Fiji police make public appeal to parents after holiday deaths
Fiji police have made a public appeal to parents to keep their children safe over the school holiday period after the deaths of four children last week. Police say one child was found floating in a river, another was hit by a car and two, a 16-year-old and a seven-year-old, took their own lives. The suicide cases in particular have raised concerns, as RNZ Pacific's Koro Vaka'uta reports. [more]

Fears rising of a summer drought
The risk of drought is rising. While winter and early spring brought a deluge of rain, saturated soils are now drying out fast. That's raised fears that the spreading dry conditions could dent agricultural and harm the wider economy. [more]

Set nets a major cause of hoiho penguin deaths - study
A new review of global research supports what activists have been saying for years - set nets are a major cause of penguin deaths. The review identifies the endangered hoiho, or yellow-eyed penguin, as one of three penguin species most under threat by fishing equipment. The New Zealand researchers who contributed to the study say the government must act urgently to save the hoiho from extinction. Dr Ursula Ellenberg is the New Zealand penguin scientist who initiated the review. [more]

Ross Sea campaigner welcomes new ocean sanctuary
A new Antarctic marine sanctuary in the Ross Sea comes into effect today, covering more than 1.5 million square kilometres of the Southern Ocean. It's been welcomed by New Zealand filmaker Peter Young - who's spent ten years campaigning for the area to be protected. [more]

Iwi energy housing project wins sustainability award
An Auckland iwi community housing project which uses a system of solar panels and batteries for energy has been recognised for its sustainability practice. Vector and Ngati Whatua Orakei teamed up on the iwi's Kainga Tuatahi development and last night won the revolutionising energy award at the NZI Sustainable Business Network Awards. [more]

Kerry-Anne Walsh with news from Australia
It's Friday so we cross the ditch to Canberra to talk to our correspondent Kerry-Anne Walsh. [more]

News Extras

Desley Lodwick speaks to Phil Pennington
Melbourne woman Dr Desley Lodwick talks about the threats she faced in exposing her husband's child porn crimes. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Cook Islands Maori for 1 December 2017
The latest news in Cook Islands Maori (Te Reo Maori Kuki Airani) - brought to you by our partner - Pacific Media Network. [more]

News in Samoan for 1 December 2017
The latest news in Samoan language (Gagana Samoa). [more]

News in Niuean for 1 December 2017
The latest news in Niuean language (Vagahau Niue) - brought to you by our partner - Pacific Media Network. [more]

News in Tongan for 1 December 2017
The latest news in Tongan language (Lea Faka-Tonga). [more]

Nights

The Pink Path Turns Two
Auckland's cycle and walk way, Te Ara i Whiti - which links Grafton Gully to Nelson Street - celebrates its second year around the block with a block party. One of the organisers, Jolisa Gracewood from Bike Auckland, joins us to talk about the path and the Light Path Festival. [more]

Jazz Juice
Some people call him the Jazz Savant - some people, not everyone! Fergus Barrowman is here with the latest Jazz releases. [more]

Nine To Noon

Trump considers plan to replace Tillerson with CIA chief
US President Donald Trump is considering a plan to oust Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in the coming weeks, in what would be the most significant shake-up so far in the administration. He is Tipped to be replaced by the CIA director Mike Pompeo, potentially bringing to close one of the most turbulent and shortest-lived tenures for a secretary of state in more than a century. Kathryn speaks with Foreign Policy intelligence reporter Jenna McLaughlin. [more]

The power of profanities
Swear words have been used in varying situations for hundreds of years, but aside from insults and exclamations, can bad language be beneficial for you? Kathryn Ryan speaks to London-based scientist, journalist and author of the book, Swearing is Good for You, Emma Bryne. [more]

Pacific correspondent Mike Field
Free speech is under renewed attack in the Pacific with Fiji running sedition trials - including against its major newspaper - and Samoa restoring criminal libel to silence a vexing blogger, the remarkable detective work on old Samoan photos and how sharks shape Pacific reefs. [more]

Saving lives on the Africa Mercy
Deborah Adesanya's life was transformed by a five-month stint aboard the world's largest civilian hospital ship –​ The Africa Mercy. The New Zealand nurse features in the eight-part documentary series The Surgery Ship. [more]

Book review - The Vanity Fair Diaries 1983 - 1992 by Tina Brown
Kiran Dass from Unity Books reviews The Vanity Fair Diaries 1983 - 1992 by Tina Brown, published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. [more]

Grant Smithies picks four favourites from new NZ funk and soul compilation Heed The Call
You are cordially invited to shake your money-maker. Compiled by Auckland record collectors John Baker and Alan Perrott, a new double album Heed The Call looks at NZ soul, funk and disco released here between 1973 and 1983. [more]

Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
The mens and women's Rugby League World Cup finals, the first Ashes test won resoundingly by Australia, and the slightly farcical edict handed down by World Rugby which bans all hand written notes or words on their arms or hands. [more]

The Week that was with Te Radar and Gemma Gracewood
A lighter look back at the week, including the reaction to Melania Trump's Christmas decor at the White House. [more]

Our Changing World

Our Changing World for 30 November 2017
A project to map coronary arteries in healthy and sick people, and on the hunt for lizards in city parks and gardens. [more]

An atlas of coronary arteries
An atlas containing hundreds of coronary arteries mapped using MRI scans will help improve heart health. [more]

Urban lizards
A hunt for urban lizards in New Zealand involves more than a thousand buckets as well as citizen scientists. [more]

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Question Time for 30 November 2017
Hon STEVEN JOYCE to the Minister of Finance: Can he confirm he plans to increase net core Crown debt from $59.5 billion as at 30 June 2017 to $67.6 billion by 2022; and can he confirm debt will not increase by any more than that? MARAMA DAVIDSON to the Minister of Conservation: What has been the Department of Conservation’s biggest recent success in predator control to better protect our native plants and wildlife? Hon Dr JONATHAN COLEMAN to the Minister of Health: What measurable outcomes, if any, will his policies deliver? SIMON O'CONNOR to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by his Government’s intention to reduce the prison population by 30 percent over the next 15 years; if so, how? KIERAN McANULTY to the Minister of Transport: Has he received any reports commissioned under the previous Government that show the value of investment in rail? Hon JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Tourism: Does he stand by all his statements? Hon GERRY BROWNLEE to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all her statements? Dr DUNCAN WEBB to the Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration: What was the expected date, prior to the General Election, that the Residential Advisory Service would cease operations, and what steps has she taken since becoming Minister to ensure the service continues for people affected by the Canterbury and Kaikōura earthquakes? BRETT HUDSON to the Associate Minister of State Services (Open Government): Does she stand by her statement in Parliament yesterday that this will be “the most open, most transparent Government that New Zealand has ever had”; if so, how? Hon LOUISE UPSTON to the Minister for Children: Is she committed to implementing the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in full? TAMATI COFFEY to the Associate Minister of Finance: How is the Government preserving the right of New Zealanders to own land in New Zealand? JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Local Government: What steps will she take to support the local government sector to achieve greater efficiency and control spending? [more]

Podcast Classics

MOZART: Piano Concerto No 20 in D minor K466
Our free classical podcast this month is Piano Concerto No 20 K466 by Mozart played by Michael Houstoun with Orchestra Wellington conducted by Marc Taddei and recorded by RNZ Concert on 7 July 2017, in Michael Fowler Centre, Wellington. [more]

Rural News

Morning Rural News for 1 December 2017
News from the rural and farming sector. [more]

Midday Rural News for 1 December 2017
News from the rural and farming sectors. [more]

The House On Demand

The House for 655pm Thurs 30 Nov
The latest from the House [more]

The House for 1035pm Thurs 30 Nov
The latest from the House [more]

The Lost

The Lost - Francesca Martin
In part five, Fran Martin popped out to the petrol station in Hamilton in 2005, bought cigarettes and wasn't seen again. Her father, Bob, has spent his life savings looking for her. [more]

The Panel

One Quick Question for 30 November 2017
We find the answers to any queries you can think up. [more]

The Panel pre-show for 30 November 2017
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. [more]

The Panel with Ellen Read, Neil Miller (Part 1)
Former CTV worker Tom Hawker reacts to the news that Police will not be laying charges over the collapse of the building in the deadly earthquake of February 2011. Murray Stuart of Paraparaumu Beach says the beach is used as a roadway and it's not just boy-racers ripping up the sand. Auckland ratepayers face a 6.2% rise, while transport remains a headache in the Queen city and Wellington. [more]

The Panel with Ellen Read, Neil Miller (Part 2)
Robots are being clothed in muscles that can lift one thousand times their own weight. They could one day work in hard manual jobs like forestry. What the Panelists Ellen Read and Neil Miller want to talk about. Air New Zealand's latest video has Santa confused about the kiwi accent. Immigration expert Mark Williams says a British midwife who didn't live with her husband in New Zealand before marrying him should still get her work visa renewed. Do the Panelists agree with many shop owners that people who rob them need harsher punishment? Two wingsuit-wearing Frenchmen have performed a death-defying stunt. They flew inside a plane after a jump in the Swiss Alps. [more]

No charges over CTV collapse
Former CTV worker Tom Hawker reacts to the news that Police will not be laying charges over the collapse of the building in the deadly earthquake of February 2011. Mr Hawker says he's disappointed at the decision. He witnessed the collapse of his former workplace as he headed back to the building after a lunch break. [more]

Beaches as roadways
Murray Stuart of Paraparaumu Beach says the beach is used as a roadway and it's not just boy-racers ripping up the sand. Murray's had dogs killed by racing cars and he's been decked after confronting drivers about their dangerous moves. [more]

Transport and rates in the biggest cities
Auckland ratepayers face a 6.2% rise, while transport remains a headache in the Queen city and Wellington. [more]

Robot muscles are spectacularly strong
Robots are being clothed in muscles that can lift one thousand times their own weight. They could one day work in hard manual jobs like forestry. [more]

Panel Says
What the Panelists Ellen Read and Neil Miller want to talk about. [more]

Wot eccsent?
Air New Zealand's latest video has Santa confused about the kiwi accent. [more]

Midwife should be allowed to stay
Immigration expert Mark Williams says a British midwife who didn't live with her husband in New Zealand before marrying him should still get her work visa renewed. [more]

More robberies and no more answers
Do the Panelists agree with many shop owners that people who rob them need harsher punishment? [more]

Winged wonder
Two wingsuit-wearing Frenchmen have performed a death-defying stunt. They flew inside a plane after a jump in the Swiss Alps. [more]

The Wireless

Top 10 stories of the month - November 2017
In case you missed something, here are our top stories for November. [more]

Upbeat

Lucy Lawless: 'I’m more of an activist than an artist'
Lucy Lawless is outspoken. She talks art, activism, sexual misconduct in Hollywood, the Hobbit Law and what she wants her legacy to be, with RNZ Concert's Zoe George.   [more]

Crossover hit from the 70s resurfaces
US pianist Steve Barta is hoping to interest a New Zealand orchestra in his arrangement of Claude Bolling's 1975 orchestral crossover hit: Suite for Flute & Jazz Piano. Barta is a composer and arranger from Texas who’s always had a passion for the flute. In his new arrangement he’s worked with leading US flutist Hubert Laws to breathe new life into Bolling’s orchestral suite which spent 530 weeks in the classical charts and spawned the term “crossover”. [more]

World & Pacific News

1pm Pacific Regional News for 30 November 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

3pm Pacific Regional News for 30 November 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

7pm Pacific Regional News for 30 November 2017
The latest Pacific regional news. [more]

6am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

7am World, Pacific and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

11am World, Pacific and Sports News for 1 December 2017
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News [more]

News stories:

Watchdog sounds science denial warning
The level of distrust in science and experts is getting worse in New Zealand, the Environmental Protection Authority says. [more]

Police seek advice on Stokes
Police are seeking advice over whether to bring charges against England all-rounder Ben Stokes following their investigation into his arrest on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. [more]

Smith wins Golden Boot for second time
Cameron Smith has identified back-to-back NRL premierships as his next challenge after claiming a second Golden Boot award. [more]

Pacific police urged to apply zero tolerance approach to violence
Civil society organisations working with survivors of gender-based violence in the Pacific are urging police in the region to apply a strict zero tolerance approach to gender based violence. [more]

Worker replaces Southee in NZ squad
Central Districts batsman George Worker has replaced Tim Southee in the Black Caps squad for the first test against the West Indies in Wellington. [more]

Serena Williams holding back call on Australian Open
Serena Williams is yet to make a call on her participation at the Australian Open, while tennis world number 12 Svetlana Kuznetsova is also a doubt for the first grand slam of 2018 after undergoing wrist surgery. [more]

War criminal dies after drinking poison in court
A Bosnian Croat war criminal has died in hospital after drinking poison during an appeal hearing in The Hague. [more]

Rocket Lab to open launch window next week
New Zealand company Rocket Lab is set to launch its second test flight early next month, with a 10-day launch window opening next Friday. [more]

Vanuatu opposition leader urges caution over reforms for greylist
Vanuatu's opposition leader says the government has conceded the country's interests too readily to satisfy international requirements over its tax haven status. [more]

World Rugby wrist message ban 'embarrassing'
New Zealand Rugby Players Association boss Rob Nichol says the move by World Rugby to ban players writing messages on their wrist strapping is embarrassing. [more]

It's going to be a hot one - Niwa
Sticky, hot weather is on the cards this summer - which means more people will be flocking to the beach. [more]

Trump retweets far-right group's anti-Muslim videos
US President Donald Trump has retweeted three inflammatory videos from a British far-right group. [more]

Hardie cops three month ban from Scotland
New Zealand-born Scotland flanker John Hardie has been suspended for three months by Scottish Rugby for alleged cocaine use. [more]

Sticky TV warns parents about phony photographer
A person claiming to be from the Sticky TV children's show has reportedly been approaching parents on social media in an attempt to take photographs of their children. [more]

Auckland ratepayers could face 6.2 percent hike
Aucklanders could face rates rises averaging 6.2 percent next year in the biggest shakeup yet of how they pay for the city's growing needs. [more]

Matt Lauer sacked over sex allegation
NBC fired the high-profile news anchor and The Today Show co-host over an allegation of sexual misconduct. [more]

VDS rollout making headway in Pacific fishery
The Parties to the Nauru Agreement, or PNA, says the roll out of its Vessel Day Scheme in the long line tuna fishery is progressing well despite stiff opposition from distant water fishing nations. [more]

Piracy on the decline despite Sky TV fears, say internet providers
Sky Television is being accused of being out-of-touch after launching legal action to force internet service providers to block pirate websites. [more]

Former immigration officer arrested for passport fraud
A former immigration officer in Samoa, David Nomereta Uaine, has been charged in relation to an ongoing Police investigation into the alleged sale of Samoan passports online. [more]

Weight loss competition to kick off in Nauru
Nauru is encouraging people to shed pounds in a weight loss competition coinciding with celebrations marking fifty years since independence. [more]

Garrison Keillor fired over alleged inappropriate behaviour
Veteran US radio show host Garrison Keillor, creator of the show A Prairie Home Companion, has been fired over an accusation of inappropriate behaviour. [more]

Hudson confirms move to MLS
The just-departed All Whites coach Anthony Hudson has explained his main reasons for joining American football club the Colorado Rapids. [more]

Bougainville fearful over money owed by PNG
The President of Bougainville said it is vital Papua New Guinea properly funds the region as it prepares for a referendum on independence. [more]

Defence force personnel in Fiji plant mangrove seedlings
Defence force personnel in Fiji have planted 5000 mangrove seedlings in Suva's foreshore to mitigate the effects of climate change. [more]

Toxic algae bloom forces swimmers out of Hutt River
Wellington swimmers are being warned to stay out of the Hutt River as the warm weather causes toxic algae to bloom. [more]

Māori music making its mark
In today's ever changing music landscape, a surge of Māori artists are making their mark in the music world. [more]

Joshua, Parker 'weeks' from deal
A unification fight between heavyweight world champions Britain's Anthony Joshua and New Zealand's Joseph Parker could be confirmed in the next two weeks. [more]

Changes called for after 7 year old suicide case in Fiji
The director of a suicide prevention service in Fiji said the death of a seven year old highlights the need for changes to educational programmes. [more]

American Samoa losing patience over Philippines company delay
January will mark two years since ground broke at a site in American Samoa where Filipino company AVM Bernardo planned to build a food processing plant. [more]

MP's 2013 gay marriage speech goes viral in Japan
A speech made by former MP Maurice Williamson four years ago has become a battle cry for marriage equality among Japanese social media users. [more]

Plants from Cook's first voyage show change in CO2
A study of James Cook's botanical collection confirm changes to the atmosphere. [more]

'I did everything I could to help rescue those little girls'
Australian women who discovered their husbands' stash of child sex abuse images speak out. [more]

An ode to the stoical West Indies fan
Opinion - It's a tough gig being a Black Caps fan but spare a thought for the long-suffering West Indies supporter, writes Matt Richens. [more]

Fiji Times sedition trial set for Dec 11
The Fiji Times sedition trial is set to start on December 11 after the High Court in Suva refixed the trial date. [more]

Homeless drug addict faces two years jail for weapon theft
The criminal court in French Polynesia has jailed a 21-year-old man for two years for stealing a policeman's firearm from his home in Paea. [more]

Deportation fears for arrested Manus Island men
Refugees on Papua New Guinea's Manus Island say three Pakistani asylum seekers have been arrested for deportation. [more]

Whānau rally to save "death trap" urban marae
Whānau have rallied to save an urban marae labelled a "death trap" by the Wellington City Council last year. [more]

Foreign buyer changes: Seymour 'absolutely' outraged
The imminent changes to foreign ownership of rural land are absolutely outrageous, ACT leader David Seymour says. [more]

Tonga's northern Niuas gets new boat link
The man behind a new sailing boat which will transport cargo to Tonga's northern islands says the vessel will change the lives of people in the Niuas. [more]

Sport: All go for Team Tonga Mini Games flight
A charter flight taking Tonga's athletes to the Pacific Mini Games will go ahead today after the government finally followed through with some funds. [more]

Travel on Wellington roads getting slower
Driving around the Wellington region takes longer than a few years ago, despite a new expressway and a goal to speed up traffic. [more]

Kiribati opposition MP derides "fantasy" 20 year plan
A senior opposition MP in Kiribati says the government's 20 year vision, known as KV20, is full of dreams that are unrealistic. [more]

Auckland train workers vote for strike over safety concerns
Auckland train services may grind to a halt shortly after union members voted to strike. [more]

Australia to hold major inquiry into nation's banks
Australia will hold a royal commission inquiry into its banking and financial sector, its government has announced. [more]

CTV survivor confirms no charges will be laid over building collapse in 2011 earthquake
CTV survivor confirms no charges will be laid over building collapse in 2011 earthquake [more]

Wool price drop hits farmers
Wool producers are struggling to get by as export values continue to plunge, a Marlborough sheep farmer says. [more]

Unknown number of American Samoa police now carrying firearms
Questions have been raised in American Samoa over the arming of the territory's police. [more]

Sport: PNG and Hong Kong Kong share spoils on day one
Papua New Guinea and Hong Kong are evenly poised at stumps on day one of their Intercontinental Cup cricket clash in Sharjah. [more]

Henry gets selection nod for Black Caps
The pace bowler Matt Henry has got the nod over Lockie Ferguson for New Zealand's first cricket Test against the West Indies. [more]

Bougainville suspects PNG Govt undermining it
Bougainville's president John Momis said he suspects the Papua New Guinea government is trying to undermine the region's autonomous government. [more]

Help sought to restore flagship Cook Islands canoe
The Cook Islands Voyaging Society is expecting to meet with the prime minister Henry Puna this week over assistance to restore the country's flagship traditional ocean voyaging canoe. [more]

PNG police call for contract resolution on Manus
Papua New Guinea police say a meeting of landowners, contractors and Australian and PNG officials will be key to easing tensions on Manus island. [more]

Sport: Fijiana look to build on best ever campaign
The Fiji women's sevens team is looking to pick up where they left off as the new World Series kicks off in Dubai. [more]

Timeline: CTV building collapse
It's been nearly seven years since the 2011 earthquake, and a police investigation into the CTV building collapse has been running since December 2014. [more]

American Samoa governor stresses support for canneries
American Samoa's governor, Lolo Matalasi Moliga, has dismissed criticism that he is "anti-canneries". [more]

Deposits need to drop, says loan company
A home loan provider says the 20 percent deposit needs to drop - so more people have a chance at getting on the property ladder. [more]

Foreign buyer changes cause debate over land prices
The governent's tightening of overseas investment in NZ farm land is causing some debate over whether or not it will lower land prices. [more]

Auckward: Supercity secession bids fail
Bids by the two local communities to break away from the Auckland Council have been rejected by the Local Government Commission. [more]

RECAP: No charges over CTV deaths
115 people died in the CTV building when it collapsed in the February 2011 Canterbury earthquake. Today, police confirmed no one will be charged. See how the announcement unfolded. [more]

Wellington apartments throttle housing consents
The number of building consents for new homes has fallen due to a drop in new apartments. [more]

CTV: 'Believe me, we have anguished over this'
Despite a three-year investigation, there is not enough evidence to lay charges over the collapse of the CTV builidng in the Christchurch earthquake more than six years ago, police say. [more]

Tomorrow's Wellington train strike called off after unions and management settle dispute
Tomorrow's Wellington train strike called off after unions and management settle dispute [more]

Back on track: Wellington rail strike cancelled
A planned strike of rail workers in Wellington has been called off after unions and management settled their dispute. [more]

Rainfall shortage 'dramatic'
Farmers are keeping a close eye on the rain radar, as soil moisture levels plummet. [more]

Moves in Noumea to end lengthy political impasse
Media reports from New Caledonia say moves are afoot to form a government which would end a three-month political impasse. [more]

Low score for West Coast polytech
A West Coast polytech has been given the worst-ever quality rating for a public tertiary institution. [more]

Thousands of tonnes of rocks removed from Roxburgh
Thousands of tonnes of rock are being shifted out of Roxburgh each day as the town recovers from this week's flash flooding. [more]

Former head of Tahiti football detained in corruption probe
The former head of Tahiti Football, Reynald Temarii, has been detained in Papeete in a probe into the allocation of the 2018 and 2022 Football World Cups. [more]

Man charged over sexual assaults at retreat
A 61-year old man has appeared in court on charges of sexual abuse against cleaners from Japan and Taiwan who were staying at a retreat on the East Cape. [more]

Canterbury signs Stokes
Suspended England all-rounder Ben Stokes has signed with Canterbury Cricket for the upcoming 50-over and Twenty20 domestic competitions. [more]

Man who killed friend denied parole
A man who killed a friend and hid his body in an abandoned house and assumed his identity has lost his third bid for freedom. [more]

NZ 'could not' apply water tax - diplomat
Government plans to put a royalty on bottled water exports could be in jeopardy after a top trade negotiator warned MPs it would breach trade deals. [more]

Fiji psychologist dismayed by child suicide
A psychologist in Fiji says she finds it hard to believe that a seven year old could commit suicide. [more]

Govt's paid parental leave bill passes
A bill that extends paid parental leave has passed in Parliament this afternoon. [more]

Kiwi Ferns determined to bring cup home
It's a hot, muggy day in Queensland, but it's doing little to hamper the preparation of the Kiwi Ferns as they attempt to win back the Women's Rugby League World Cup from Australia. [more]

New food processing plant in American Samoa moving forward
Officials in American Samoa say a Philippines-based company is moving forward with its food processing plant in the territory. [more]

'There's no justice in this world'
Survivors of the CTV collapse and family members of those who lost their lives have called for a law change to cover corporate manslaughter. [more]

Murray may have spent more than officially recorded - Audit NZ
The former head of the Waikato DHB, who resigned part-way through an investigation into his excessive travel costs, may have spent more than the official record shows, according to Audit NZ. [more]

Cricket: Meet the stars of the West Indies team
The Black Caps are taking on the West Indies in their first Test match in Wellington tomorrow, but who are they actually facing? Matt Richens profiles some of the stars of the West Indies squad. [more]

Nelson resident gets council apology
A man who has been living rough for years in Nelson as a protest has received an apology from Nelson City Council for its disrespectful treatment of him. [more]

OIO eyeing Lauer for 'character test'
US broadcaster Matt Lauer, who leases a 6500ha lakefront Wanaka station, is under scrutiny from the Overseas Investment Office after being accused of sexual misconduct. [more]

Business confidence 'deeply negative'
Business confidence has plunged to its lowest level in eight years. [more]

Trump hits out at UK PM after far-right tweets
In an unprecedented exchange, the US President Donald Trump rounded on UK Prime Minister Theresa May after she criticised his sharing of far-right videos. [more]

Birkenhead slip gives businesses the jitters
Frustrated business owners on Auckland's North Shore are worried a major slip that swallowed machinery could be coming for their buildings next. [more]

Mt Agung has deep significance for the Balinese
According to international media coverage, the main problem with Gunung Agung's eruption is that the airport is closed and tourists cannot get in or out. [more]

Iwi leaders unanimously oppose seismic testing
Iwi leaders at a national hui have unanimously opposed the continuation of seismic testing and oil exploration in New Zealand waters. [more]

Four 'unsafe' Dunedin cricket pitches closed
Four cricket grounds in Dunedin have been closed for the rest of the year because of sub-standard, dangerous pitches. [more]

Corporate manslaughter law on cards - minister
The CTV building collapse joins Pike River as another example of those responsible getting off scot-free, the Justice Minister says. [more]

Large liquid nitrogen spill in Auckland
People have been allowed back into Auckland University's medical campus after a chemical spill forced evacuations. [more]

Giant Tesla battery starts early
South Australia's giant Tesla battery has begun dispatching stored wind power into the electricity grid a day ahead of its scheduled switch-on. [more]