Radio New Zealand - Thursday, 24th May 2018

This page lists items from RNZ that are available online. RNZ didn't start regularly putting both its audio and news content online until 2008. From 2002-2007 written news items (particularly from RNZ International) were placed online. You can access items prior to 2002 on the historic page.

This page features: Business News, Checkpoint, Dateline Extras, Dateline Pacific, Go Ahead Caller, Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, Lately, Midday Report, Morning Report, News in Pacific Languages, News Stories, Nights, Nine To Noon, Our Changing World, Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time, RNZ Music, Rural News, Te Manu Korihi, The House, The House On Demand, The Panel, The Wireless, Upbeat, World & Pacific News

Business News

Bumper kiwifruit sales boost April trade suplus
Bumper kiwifruit sales have helped push the trade balance back into surplus. [more]

Metro Glass's profit falls 16% with soft NZ market
The glass manufacturer, Metro Performance Glass has delivered a disappointing result with its profit down 16 percent on last year. [more]

Environmental company secures a multi-million deal
A local environmental company, Aquafortus Technologies has secured a multi-million deal with a Texas petrol outfit. [more]

Midday Markets for 24 May 2018
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Rupert Lister of Hobson Wealth Partners. [more]

Evening business for Thursday 24 May
News from the business sector, including a market report. [more]

Early Business News for 25 May 2018
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Business News for 25 may 2018
Metro Performance Glass gets back to basics. A local start up wants Kiwi investors for dirty water schemes. Scientists team up with local companies. And the latest from the markets.  [more]

Markets Update for 25 May 2018
A brief update of movements in the financial sector. [more]

Checkpoint

Checkpoint with John Campbell for 24 May, 2018
Watch Thursday's full show here. [more]

Sharemilkers lose everything after raising alarm about M bovis
Mary and Sarel Potgieter were the first people in New Zealand to blow the whistle on Mycoplasma bovis. Mary tells John Campbell they haven't been compensated and are now living off their credit cards. Warning, some listeners may find some of what Mary says about the disease disturbing. [more]

Panel recommends pay rise for nurses to avoid strikes
An independent panel has recommended nurses receive an overall 9 percent payrise over the next two years, but their union says it's less than what they hoped, and might not be enough to stop nurses from striking. [more]

Midwife spent $11,000 on petrol in past year
A rural midwife says she's spent $11,000 on petrol in the last year and faces a bigger bill this year as fuel prices skyrocket. There are warnings the worst is yet to come. [more]

Speaker refuses to respond to National's demands
A particularly testy session unfolded in Parliament today when National demanded Speaker Trevor Mallard respond to comments about an alleged sexist remark against the Prime Minister. [more]

Kiwifruit packing company describes jobs as 's*** work'
After pointing to "welfare dependency" as a reason for its worker shortage a fortnight ago, a kiwifruit packing company has now admitted its jobs are "shit work". [more]

No fishing companies prosecuted over under-reporting of catch
Big fishing companies, including Sanford and Talley's, under-reported hundreds of tonnes of hoki, but MPI didn't prosecute them because it says court action doesn't help change behaviour. [more]

Phil Twyford offers resignation over phone call on plane
Transport Minister Phil Twyford has offered to resign after making a phone call on a domestic flight after the aircraft doors had shut. [more]

Deep South feels the brunt of early wintry blast
Queenstown and the surrounding areas have experienced freezing temperatures, icy roads and plenty of snow. For some, it marks the beginning of the best time of the year. [more]

Climate change experts urge govt to do more - now
A climate change group's final report has called on the government to be more proactive in the face of climate change, and do more to figure out how to pay for the work it needs to do. [more]

M bovis compensation taking too long - MPI
Compensation for farmers and sharemilkers who have lost money over Mycoplasma bovis "has taken too long" to pay out, MPI's director of response and readiness Geoff Gwyn says. [more]

Transport Minister stripped of CAA role after flight phone call
Transport Minister Phil Twyford has apologised "unreservedly" and offered to resign after making a phone call on a domestic flight after the aircraft doors had shut. [more]

Stars arrive for Pacific Music Awards
The Pacific Music Awards have been held as a separate event to the New Zealand music awards since 2005, in an effort to celebrate and promote excellence in Pacific music. [more]

Dateline Extras

Former Fiji coup leader turns democracy champion
Fiji's first coup leader Sitiveni Rabuka talks about the freedoms he says the Sodelpa Party will return to the country if he is elected prime minister later this year. [image:72004:full] [more]

Dateline Pacific

Punialava'a to receive Lifetime Achievement Award
Renowned Samoa music group wins Lifetime Achievement Award in New Zealand. [more]

Lack of will for political reform in Cook Islands
An advocate for political reform in the Cook Islands says candidates in the up coming general election on June the 15th need to voice their views on long standing recommendations for political reform. [more]

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 24 May 2018
An advocate for political reform in the Cook Islands says candidates in the up coming general election on June the 15th need to voice their views on long standing recommendations for political reform; renowned Samoa music group wins Lifetime Achievement Award in New Zealand; French Polynesia readies for a huge Chinese fish farm at Hao Atoll; A Marshallese poet links the affects of climate change and nuclear tests to the islands future; A boost for Pasifika businesses in a New Zealand Start Up Weekend. [more]

Sport: PNG Rugby maps path forward following mediation
PNG Rugby's new administration plots path ahead after rival factions come together. [more]

Not guilty a victory for Fiji Times' integrity - publisher
The Fiji Times publisher says being found not guilty of sedition is a victory for the newspaper's integrity. [more]

Theme of community support strong at Pacific music's big night
Pacific music on show in Aotearoa New Zealand at the 14th annual Vodafone Pacific Music Awards. [more]

Anote Tong says cutting emissions won't save Kiribati
A former Kiribati president and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Anote Tong says the Paris Climate Agreement has come too late for low-lying Pacific states like Kiribati. [more]

Bougainville prepares to vote for a future with or without PNG
It's less that 13 months from a referendum in Bougainville that could see the region voting to leave Papua New Guinea. [more]

Dateline Pacific morning edition for 25 May 2018
A refugee suicide on Manus Island this week follows a report that claims healthcare services in Australian offshore detention have been reduced; An advocate for political reform in the Cook Islands says candidates in the up coming general election on June the 15th need to voice their views on long standing recommendations for political reform; the Fiji Times publisher says being found not guilty of sedition is a victory for the newspaper's integrity; renowned Samoa music group wins Lifetime Achievement Award in New Zealand; PNG Rugby's new administration plots path ahead after rival factions come together. [more]

Manus refugee suicide as healthcare reduced
A refugee suicide on Manus Island this week follows a report that claims healthcare services in Australian offshore detention have been reduced. [more]

Dateline Pacific evening edition for 25 May 2018
It's less that 13 months from a referendum in Bougainville that could see the region voting to leave Papua New Guinea; A former Kiribati president and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Anote Tong says the Paris Climate Agreement has come too late for low-lying Pacific states like Kiribati; Pacific music on show in Aotearoa New Zealand at the 14th annual Vodafone Pacific Music Awards; A refugee suicide on Manus Island this week follows a report that claims healthcare services in Australian offshore detention have been reduced; PNG Rugby's new administration plots path ahead after rival factions come together. [more]

Go Ahead Caller

Go Ahead Caller - Ser 10 Ep 1 'Israel Folau'
Ken speaks out in support of the prominent rugby player who is deeply concerned about saving particular kinds of people from eternal damnation. By Paul Casserly Voices - Toni Potter and Paul Casserly Studio engineering - Rangi Powick [more]

Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm

Zulu Love sing live
Zulu Love from South Africa is made up of some of Soweto's best musicians. The group is touring New Zealand with the show, South African Harmonies and perform live for us in our Wellington studio. [more]

Plastic in food production "a ticking time bomb"
Supermarkets are reducing their use of plastic shopping bags and people are starting to realise just how much damage plastic is causing our oceans - but what about the impact on our soils? [more]

Landfall's 'buried literary treasure' online
Otago University Press has digitised the first 20 years of Landfall - that's 80 issues and the work of 540 authors including some of our greatest writers such as Janet Frame and Frank Sargeson. [more]

Exercise and ageing: new research on its benefits
More evidence on the benefits of exercise as we age. It's never too early to start! [more]

Great album
Appetite for Destruction. [more]

Theatre Critic John Smythe
Home grown shows being peformed in Wellington. [more]

Solving the world's problems
Simon Wilson from the NZ Herald joins us to talk about a damning report into road safety in Auckland and what needs to be done to improve things. [more]

The history of the New Zealand aristocracy
Has New Zealand ever had an aristocracy? Grant Morris of Victoria University looks back [more]

Short Story Club
Today we discuss Pip Adam's short story The Woman, the Girl Pip just won the Acorn Foundation Prize for Fiction at the Ockham NZ book awards, so we're giving away a copy of her winning book The New Animals to the writer of the best email about The Woman, the Girl. [more]

Tell me about your thesis
Alison Booth tells us about her thesis, Dunedin Performance networks: Indian cultural production in Aotearoa/New Zealand [more]

Lately

Lately with Karyn Hay
Big waves hit the West Coast Should be make smoking illegal? Hot off the press from The Pacific Music Awards [more]

Midday Report

Midday News for 24 May 2018
The government is told to speed up help for councils dealing with climate change. A winter chill is closing roads and causing problems in the South Island. [more]

Midday Sports News for 24 May 2018
The troubled basketballer Corey Webster is getting a third chance with the New Zealand Breakers. [more]

Morning Report

Top Stories for Friday 25 May 2018
We ask the Prime Minister why she didn't accept Phil Twyford's offer to resign. Officials are accused of allowing unsafe cladding to be used on high-rises, It's off - Donald Trump cancels his meeting with North Korea's leader Brendon Hartley shoots up the timing sheets in practice for the Monaco Grand Prix [more]

Sports News for 25 May 2018
British cyclist Simon Yates has had his overall lead over defending champion Tom Dumoulin cut in half on the 18th stage of the Giro d'Italia. German Maximilian Schachmann won the stage. New Zealand's George Bennett finished 22nd, and he's dropped one spot to be 11th overall. [more]

Nurses unhappy with pay proposal
Some nurses say an independent panel's recommendations to boost pay don't go far enough and they hope proposed strikes do go ahead. The panel, which has been working to resolve a pay dispute between District Health Boards and nurses, has recommended a three percent pay increase in June, to be followed by another three percent increase in August, and a final three percent increase in 2019. RNZ reporter Nita Blake-Persen spoke to Wellington nurse Kathleen who told her that needs to be much more. [more]

Bastion Point: Dawn ceremony marks 40 years since evictions
A dawn ceremony is being held to mark the 40th anniversary of the Bastion Point occupation. In 1978, police and army personnel forcibly evicted more than 200 people from Takaparawhau Taka para whau or Bastion Point in Auckland. They had been there for more than 500 days, defying government plans for a housing development on what had been Ngati Whatua reserve land. Te Manu Korihi reporter John Boynton is at the event. He talks to Susie Ferguson. [more]

Twyford loses CAA role after plane phone call
Transport Minister Phil Twyford has been stripped of one his roles and is apologising profusely after getting caught making a phone call on a plane. Mr Twyford offered his resignation to the Prime Minister on Thursday after National's Judith Collins began asking about the incident. Jacinda Ardern didn't accept his resignation but took Mr Twyford's responsibility for the Civil Aviation Authority off him. [more]

National not backing down in dispute with Speaker Mallard
The Parliamentary showdown between the Opposition and the Speaker of the House, Trevor Mallard, remains entrenched - with National MPs saying they're not backing down. It comes after scenes of disarray in the debating chamber yesterday - resulting in National's deputy Paula Bennett being ejected from the House. [more]

Sports News for 25 May 2018
The depleted Crusaders can't win a trick in the lead up to tonight's top of the table Super Rugby showdown with the Hurricanes in Christchurch with another key player a late scratching. [more]

Ardern 'deeply disappointed' after Twyford's call on plane
The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says it was only yesterday that Transport Minister Phil Twyford realised he'd made a big mistake by making a phone call on board a plane. Mr Twyford offered to resign but Ms Ardern refused the offer. She did however strip him of his Civil Aviation Authority portfolio. Ms Ardern tells Guyon Espiner: "I cannot determine at the time if it was something obvious to [Twyford]. Either way, clearly the doors were closed." [more]

Fire engineer warns of lack of action over aluminium cladding
Officials are being accused of allowing unsafe cladding to be used on high-rise buildings. Leading Melbourne fire engineer, Tony Enright, is speaking out after the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment blocked the release to RNZ News of a crucial report. Dr Enright's audit for MBIE last November called for the immediate suspension of the Codemark certificates for most of the composite panels used on high-rises in this country. He says the panels are a potential fire hazard. Instead, in March the ministry questioned his advice and called in another engineer to review it. That review has been done but the ministry is refusing to make it public. It insists no risk to public safety has been identified. The ministry declined an interview. RNZ reporter Phil Pennington talks to fire engineer Tony Enright. [more]

Winter nurses' strike may not be averted
Hopes of avoiding a nurses' strike in the middle of winter may be dashed. An independent panel yesterday recommended an immediate 3 percent pay rise from June, with another 3 percent rise in August this year, and again in August next year to cover the cost of living, as well as a one-off $2000 payment. But New Zealand Nurses Organisation spokesperson Cee Payne says the recommendations fall short of dealing with nurses' pay concerns. [more]

Trump cans planned North Korea talks - analysis
The United States has cancelled the meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong-Un, citing an insult levelled at the US vice-president, Mike Pence. Mr Trump referred to a statement from a North Korean official yesterday that called Mr Pence ignorant, stupid, and a political dummy after Mr Pence compared the communist state to the failed state of Libya. Also in that statement Donald Trump said that the American military is "more ready than its ever been before" to respond if needed. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says the cancellation is 'hugely disappointing' and she hopes the dialogue between the two countries will continue. Our correspondent in Washington Harry Horton discusses the latest changes with Guyon Espiner. [more]

Gerry Brownlee discusses Opposition dispute with Mallard
A strongly-worded letter penned by the National Party questioning the conduct of the Speaker of the House has been ignored by Trevor Mallard. The Speaker has been confiscating questions from MPs and allocating them to the opposition, prompting Paula Bennett to walk out in protest and then get kicked-out the following day. It's ruffled National's feathers to the point where they considered walking out of Question Time en masse. Shadow leader of the House Gerry Brownlee wrote the letter. He talks to Susie Ferguson. [more]

Missile that hit MH17 was Russian - report
International investigators say that the missile that downed a Malaysia Airlines flight over eastern Ukraine in 2014 belonged to a Russian brigade. For the first time, the Dutch-led team said the missile came from a Russian brigade based in the city of Kursk. A New Zealand citizen Mary Menke and New Zealand resident Rob Ayley were among the 298 people on board the the Boeing 777 who died when it broke apart in mid-air flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. Anna Holligan is in Bunnik in the Netherlands and attended the very revealing press conference with the latest findings. [more]

Acoustic attack or mass psychogetic illness?
The US has issued a health alert after a consulate official in China suffered a mysterious brain injury. The illness is similar to that experienced by several US diplomats in Cuba last year, which led to a massive diplomatic fallout and concerns an 'accoustic attack' had taken place. Robert Bartholomew, who teaches at Botany Downs Secondary School in Auckland, is an expert in mass psychogenic illness. He suggests the mysterious symptoms are more psychological than the result of an attack. [more]

M bovis: Contain or eradicate? Federated Farmers talk to govt
To contain or to eradicate - that is the question for a last-chance meeting on Mycoplasma bovis to be held today. Federated Farmers, Dairy New Zealand, and Beef and Lamb will have one final conversation with the Government before a decision is made that will go to Cabinet on Monday. Katie Milne is Federated Farmers' president. She talks to Susie Ferguson. [more]

Kingi Taurua: A fighter in Vietnam and Waitangi
Ngapuhi kaumatua Kingi Taurua has died after a short illness. The high-profile and often controversial Maori activist had a voice and a face that many New Zealanders recognise... especially as he was front and centre at Waitangi Day protests at Te Tii Marae for many years. Mr Taurua was born in Oromahoe, a little village in the Bay of Islands, in 1937. He lived on a little farm with five cows, and a two-bedroom house that was home to 10 children and another 10 whangai. His first job was on the wharf and he had to start queueing at about 3am. There'd be long lines of men hoping to get a job. Mr Taurua served in army - in Singapore and Vietnam - but also on guard duty at Buckingham Palace. He was a prison guard at Paremoremo then a probation officer, and a political advisor at the Beehive before returning home to set up Te Taumata Kaumatua, the Council of Elders. Labour MP Peeni Henare, also from Ngapuhi, knew Kingi Taurua well. He talks to Guyon Espiner. [more]

Sports News for 25 May 2018
The Crusaders coach Scott Robertson is cursing his bad luck after they lost more firepower for tonight's top of the table Super Rugby clash with the Hurricanes in Christchurch. [more]

Weinstein to hand himself in to New York police
Harvey Weinstein is expected to turn himself in to Police in New York to face charges of sexual assault and harrassment from dozens of women. The former movie producer who worked with some of Hollywood's biggest stars has been accused by more than 70 women of sexual misconduct including rape. This comes on the same day actor Morgan Freeman is apologising for making women feel "uneasy" after eight women say he sexually harassed them or made inappropriate remarks. US film star Morgan Freeman has apologised following allegations of sexual misconduct made by eight women and several others. One production assistant accused Freeman of harassing her for months during the filming of the movie Going in Style. She said the 79-year-old touched her repeatedly, tried to lift her skirt and asked if she was wearing underwear. We talk to New York correspondent Nick Harper. [more]

British insurers warn against use of aluminium panels
In the wake of the Grenfell fire disaster British insurers are demanding a ban on combustable cladding on high rises - including the kind that is widely used in New Zealand. Aluminium composite panels, called FR can still burn but not as much as the type used on the London tower where 71 people died. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment says the panels are not putting the public at risk. Laura Hughes from the Association of British Insurers told RNZ reporter Phil Pennington they should not be in use. [more]

Dawn ceremony marks 40 years since Bastion Point evictions
Forty years ago today the commissioner of Crown land George MacMillan gave the orders for more than 800 police and army personnel to begin forcibly evicting protestors from Bastion Point in Auckland. The protestors had occupied the former Ngati Whatua reserve land for more than 500 days to block government plans for a housing development. The evictions and arrests were a low point in race relations, but also a turning point in events that led to the creation of the Waitangi Tribunal. Commemorations of the occupation began with a dawn ceremony at Takaparawhau Bastion Point on Friday. Sharon Hawke's parents led the protest 40 years ago. She was arrested there when she was just 16 years old and she is there again today. She talks to Susie Ferguson. [more]

National MPs in stand-off with Speaker of House
It's been a feisty week in Parliament with escalating tensions between National Party MPs and the Speaker of the House, Trevor Mallard. On Thursday Mr Mallard ordered National's deputy leader Paula Bennett from the House after a series of confrontations with members of the opposition. It's not the first time opposition MPs have clashed with Parliament's Speaker. Mr Mallard was the worst offender in his day, having been kicked out nine times in six years - perhaps most-notably for telling then-speaker David Carter to sit down in 2013. [more]

Will Opposition vote 'no confidence' in Mallard as Speaker?
It's been more tense than usual in Parliament over the past week, with an escalating dispute between National Party MPs and the Speaker of the House, Trevor Mallard. On Thursday Mr Mallard ordered National's deputy leader Paula Bennett from the House after a series of confrontations with members of the Opposition. What is expected to happen? Guyon Espiner talks to RNZ deputy political editor Chris Bramwell. [more]

Council connects young job-seekers with employers
Thousands of young job-seekers met potential employers in Auckland yesterday in an event aimed at getting more of the city's youth into jobs. Auckland Council organised the JobFest because more than 26-thousand young people in Auckland aren't in education, employment or training. With the construction, tourism and hospitality sectors booming, there were plenty of jobs on offer at yesterday's special JobFest. [more]

Racing driver Scott Dixon hoping for Indy 500 win
The Auckland motor racing driver Scott Dixon is feeling confident going into Monday morning's Indianapolis 500 and says last year's spectacular high-speed crash is not playing on his mind. Dixon was caught up in another driver's accident and was lucky to emerge unscathed after his car was sent flying through the air at more than 350 kmh before hitting a barrier. The 37-year old told RNZ sports reporter Barry Guy his focus is on repeating his 2008 Indy 500 win, but that will mean a lot needs to come together on the day. [more]

Weather: A frosty week ahead for NZ - NIWA
It's still officially autumn but winter arrived with a vengeance in Queenstown and the surrounding areas on Thursday with freezing temperatures, icy roads and lots of snow. Niwa forecaster Chris Brandolino says it will be even colder in the days ahead. [more]

Ireland to vote on loosening abortion laws
Ireland votes on Saturday on whether to remove a single sentence which enshrines a near-total ban on abortion in the constitution, even in cases of rape and fatal foetal abnormality. The eighth amendment underpins the strictest controls in a western democracy, placing the "right to life of the unborn" on a par with the life of the mother. A short while ago I spoke with our Irish correspondent Aisling O'Rourke. [more]

2018 Pacific Music Awards: Ladi6, Noah Slee, Kings claim wins
Pacific music was on show last night at the 14th annual Vodafone Pacific Music Awards in Manukau. The packed house at the Vodafone Events Centre was treated to a range of music performances including Sam Kiles, Niue Youth Network, Three Houses Down, and legacy award winners Punialava'a. Ladi6 and her team won big on the night, taking three awards including Best Female Artist, Best Producer and the Album of the Year award. [more]

Kerry-Anne Walsh with news from Australia (Every Friday)
It's Friday so we cross the ditch to Canberra to talk to our correspondent Kerry-Anne Walsh. [more]

News in Pacific Languages

News in Samoan for 25 May 2018
The latest news in Samoan language (Gagana Samoa). [more]

News in Niuean for 25 May 2018
The latest news in Niuean language (Vagahau Niue) - brought to you by our partner - Pacific Media Network. [more]

News in Tongan for 25 May 2018
The latest news in Tongan language (Lea Faka-Tonga). [more]

Nights

The Russian Job
With the Doc Edge Festival in full swing, we talk to the Petr Horký director of a documentary that follows Swedish power-manager Bo Inge Andersson, a former soldier, brought in to save the dying Lada factory in the Russian city of Tolyatti that has been losing billions of rubles every year for over four decades. [more]

Nine To Noon

Does M-Bovis spell fundamental change for the dairy industry?
Federated Farmers, DairyNZ and Beef + Lamb NZ say they are close to a consensus on their agreed position but are seeking more information in a call with government ministers today - ahead of the a paper going to Cabinet on Monday. Federated Farmers' National Vice President, Andrew Hoggard says if animal movement is seriously restricted, there will be major impacts on the sector. [more]

New Zealand's new Wikipedian-at-large
Mike Dickison - curator of natural history at the Whanganui Regional Museum - is taking on a new role as New Zealand's first Wikipedian-at-large. This job is not about him creating and editing lots of pages, but about getting out and about and encouraging other people and institutions to get involved and put material on the online enclycopedia. He starts next month and he's raring to boost New Zealand's entries. [more]

Demian Barrios: Hawaii's lava chaser
Kilauea has been erupting since the beginning of May - which has been a dream come true for self-confessed lava chaser, Demian Barrios. He's lived on Hawaii's Big Island for 2 decades, working as a photographer and documenting the active Kilauea. But since May 3rd, he's barely slept, trying to get to all the new fissures as they pop to take photographs. He's also been helping the local community keep in touch with where the danger zones are. He joins Kathryn to talk about the eruptions, his community and staying safe while following his passion. [more]

Asia correspondent Anna Fifield
US President Donald Trump has cancelled a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, blaming "tremendous anger and open hostility" from the North. [more]

Anote Tong on saving his sinking island nation
Former president of Kiribati Anote Tong talks to Kathryn Ryan about his continued fight to save his low-lying island nation from disappearing into the Pacific ocean before the end of this century. Nobel Peace Prize nominee Tong is visiting new Zealand with a film called Anote's Ark, showing at the Documentary Edge festival. The film beautifully portrays his country's terrible predicament: being swamped by the sea and becoming uninhabitable. Anote Tong's narration explains how, if technology and resources to fight climate change aren't made available, islanders may be forced to relocate, effectively becoming "climate refugees". He is determined if they do this they should do it with dignity. [more]

Unity Books review - The Cow Book
Tilly Lloyd from Unity Books reviews The Cow Book: A Story of Life on a Family Farm by John Connell, published by Granta. [more]

New music with Jeremy Taylor
Jeremy Taylor previews the new album from Tami Neilson - and likes what he hears. Also Childish Gambino's critique of modern American society, and the long-time-coming new album from former Fur Patroller Julia Deans. [more]

Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
Auckland's waterfront Stadium debate kicks off again, and the new All Black who didn't even have a Super 15 contract. [more]

The week that was
With te Radar and Pinky Agnew. [more]

Our Changing World

Our Changing World for 24 May 2018
Fifteen Dunedin citizens took part in a University of Otago citizen jury to discuss legalising euthanasia and assisted dying. [more]

A citizens' jury on euthanasia
Fifteen Dunedin citizens took part in a University of Otago citizens' jury to discuss legalising euthanasia and assisted dying. [more]

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Question Time for 24 May 2018
To be announced. [more]

RNZ Music

Five NZ dancefloor bangers with the host of legendary clubnight Atomic
The creator of legendary Wellington club nights Atomic and 24 Hour Party People, Bill E has been getting crowds dancing to New Wave and synth pop for over 20 years. For NZ Music month he's playing a banging all-local set at Wellington's San Fran. He dropped in to pick some choice local cuts, especially for RNZ Music. [more]

VIDEO: Backstage with the Pacific Music Awards winners
Ladi6, General Fiyah, Tomorrow People, and Poetik were among the winners we got to speak to fresh of the stage after their Pacific Music Awards wins at last night's ceremony in Auckland. [more]

Rural News

Midday Rural News for 24 May 2018
Latest figures from Statistics New Zealand confirm record exports of Kiwifruit. [more]

Morning Rural News for 25 May 2018
Wrangling over what to do about the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis is going down to the wire.     [more]

Te Manu Korihi

40th anniversary of Bastion Point protest removal
Forty years ago tomorrow, police and army personnel were called in to remove more than 200 people who were occupying Bastion Point. Those involved in the protest reflect on the anniversary, and warn for it to not be repeated again. [more]

The House

The House For 540Am Fri 25 May
The latest from the House [more]

The House On Demand

The House For 655Pm Thurs 24 May
The latest from the House [more]

The Panel

One Quick Question for 24 May 2018
We find the answers to any queries you can think up. Today we answered James' question about why his dog howls, Anthony's query about planets and one about eggs.  [more]

The Panel pre-show for 24 May 2018
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel. Story of the day today is about sleeping in on the weekend.  [more]

The Panel with Nadine Higgins and Andrew Clay (Part 1)
Listeners react to our discussion yesterday about the news the vote to legalise marijuana could be held next year. Some dispute Professor David Fergusson's opinion that cannabis is easy to obtain, with people pointing out that methamphetamine and synthetic cannabis is more prevalent than weed nowadays. We go through the responses with the panelists and get their view. Health advocates are calling for the Government to be more aggressive pushing alternatives to cigarettes if it wants to hit the 2025 smoke-free target. Advocates say e-cigarettes and vaping must be encouraged. One of the suggestions is to ban the sale of cigarettes. We ask the panelists what they think of the move. Following our discussion yesterday about electricity prices this winter, we get energy commentator Molly Melhuish back on the show to answer listener question on fixing the market. One proposes a regulatory group to cap the companies. Meanwhile Newshub is reporting the Government is set to pay millions of dollar in winter energy payments to highest-earning superannuitants. The panelists weigh in. We look at the new taxi service to rival Uber, Zoomy now has more than 80,000 app downloads and more than 2000 drivers, but can it become profitable? The numbers seem to suggest ride-sharers don't make money, Uber is popular but continues to have major losses. We ask the panelists what they use when they need a ride and we get expert analysis from Eric Crampton, Chief Economist at The New Zealand Initiative. [more]

The Panel with Nadine Higgins and Andrew Clay (Part 2)
A new study has discovered why some people are worse at taking orders than others and it's all about how your brain works. The study found people were more control-averse due to activity in two areas of the brain. Essentially, it boiled down to trust in the people giving the orders. We ask the panelists if they're more of a maverick or rule-follower. Plus we hear some celebrity advice. What the Panelists Nadine Higgins and Andrew Clay want to talk about. A European study argues testing methods are not good enough to predict the impact of 'biodegradable' plastic in marine habitats. Products that may have passed the biodegardability could still take a long time to degrade in lakes, rivers and oceans. Professor of Engineering Thomas Neitzert joins the show to tell us why biodegradable plastic could be dangerous for the enviornment. National has accused speaker Trevor Mallard of "pushing" the story about an MP allegedly making a sexist remark about the Prime Minister. It comes after Paula Bennett walked out of Question Time over the Speaker's system of adding or removing questions as a form of punishment. We discuss the issues with political law professor Andrew Geddis. [more]

Legalising marijuana: continued
Listeners react to our discussion yesterday about the news the vote to legalise marijuana could be held next year. Some dispute Professor David Fergusson's opinion that cannabis is easy to obtain. [more]

Next step: banning cigarettes?
Health advocates are calling for the Government to be more aggressive pushing alternatives to cigarettes if it wants to hit the 2025 smoke-free target.  [more]

Winter problems and payments
Following our discussion yesterday about electricity prices this winter, we get energy commentator Molly Melhuish back on the show to answer listener question on fixing the market.  [more]

The new taxi industry
We look at the new taxi service to rival Uber, Zoomy now has more than 80,000 app downloads and more than 2000 drivers, but can it become profitable?  [more]

Why we don't like the boss
A new study has discovered why some people are worse at taking orders than others and it's all about how your brain works. Essentially, it boiled down to trust in the people giving the orders.  [more]

Panel Says
What the Panelists Nadine Higgins and Andrew Clay want to talk about.  [more]

'Biodegradable' not properly tested
A European study argues testing methods are not good enough to predict the impact of 'biodegradable' plastic in marine habitats.  [more]

Confidence in the speaker
National has accused speaker Trevor Mallard of "pushing" the story about an MP allegedly making a sexist remark about the Prime Minister.  [more]

The Wireless

Cannabis, cash and a community’s dream
They’re poor and scarred by drug use, but tiny East Coast communities are pouring their savings into a plan to grow medicinal marijuana. [more]

Upbeat

The opera that will have you laughing (and falling in love)
Donizetti’s The Elixir of Love opens next week in Auckland. The charming, funny opera is being performed by New Zealand Opera. Conductor and Musical Director Wyn Davies, and baritone Morgan Pearse give us the lowdown on Love. [more]

Dancing with Mozart
Some of Mozart’s most stunning tunes have been used for ballet, thanks to a bevy of talented choreographers including Stephan Zeromski, for the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Dancing with Mozart opens next week in Wellington, before heading to seven other centres. [more]

Upbeat for Friday 25 May
A piano playing burglar, a successor for King’s Choir, and a collaboration between the New Zealand School of Music and Orpheus Choir make up today’s show. [more]

World & Pacific News

1pm Pacific Regional News for 24 May 2018
The latest regional Pacific news. [more]

3pm Pacific Regional News for 24 May 2018
The latest regional Pacific news. [more]

7pm Pacific Regional News for 24 May 2018
The latest regional Pacific news. [more]

5am Pacific Regional and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

6am World, Pacific Regional and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

7am World, Pacific and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

8am World, Pacific and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

9am World, Pacific and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

10am World, Pacific and Sports News for 25 May 2018
The latest World, Pacific Regional and Sports News. [more]

News stories:

PM won't commit to law change if marijuana referendum successful
The Prime Minister will not yet commit to legalising marijuana, even if the public votes for it in a non-binding referendum. [more]

Labour and National go head to head over KiwiBuild
Housing minister Phil Twyford and National's Judith Collins have gone head to head in Parliament over the affordability of KiwiBuild houses. [more]

Russian spy poisoning: Yulia Skripal hopes to return to Russia
The daughter of an ex-Russian spy poisoned in Salisbury has said she is "lucky to be alive" after the attack. [more]

Stars remain winless as Tactix snatch last gasp win
The Mainland Tactix have denied the Northern Stars their first win of the ANZ netball premiership with a last gasp 49-48 win in Christchurch. [more]

Pasifika community drives growing arts popularity
New Zealand's Arts Council says the record growth in the popularity of Pacific art in New Zealand is being driven by the community - especially its youth. [more]

FLP hails Fiji Times ruling
Fiji's opposition Labour Party has hailed the verdict in the Fiji Times sedition trial as a victory for media freedom. [more]

Maritime safety lessons in Niue
Traditional canoe fishermen in Niue are attending workshops hosted by New Zealand's Pacific Maritime Safety Programme this week to build a stronger maritime safety culture on the island. [more]

de Villiers 'runs out of gas'
Former South Africa Test captain AB de Villiers has simply "run out of gas" and announced his retirement from international cricket. [more]

Hiku's versatility invaluable for the Warriors
Peta Hiku's ability to patch up holes in the Warriors NRL spine is easing the anxiety for coach Stephen Kearney. [more]

Hesson replaces Australian coach Lehmann
The New Zealand cricket coach Mike Hesson has replaced Darren Lehmann on the ICC's cricket committee, a group responsible for helping shape the future of the sport. [more]

Kāpiti councillor convicted of sexual assault says he was set up
A Kāpiti Coast councillor found guilty of indecently assaulting a colleague maintains his innocence and believes he's been set up by others at the council. [more]

Trump lawyer 'paid by Ukraine' to arrange White House talks
Donald Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, received a secret payment of at least $400,000 to fix talks between the Ukrainian president and President Trump, according to sources in Kiev close to those involved. [more]

Man with thousands of dollars strapped to his body arrested at Tonga airport
Tongan Police have arrested a 54 year old man attempting to smuggle thousands of dollars in cash out of the country. [more]

Tonga sued for millions over Games withdrawal
Claims for millions of dollars of damages have been lodged against the government for its late withdrawal from hosting the 2019 Pacific Games. [more]

Contracts pave the way to women's Super rugby
A women's super rugby competition is the next step in a bid to make the women's game fully professional according to New Zealand Rugby chair Brent Impey. [more]

Victoria University name causes 'issues for graduates'
Victoria University of Wellington wants to drop the former monarch from its name to distinguish itself from similarly named institutions around the world. [more]

Black Ferns filled with hearts of gold, not pockets
Opinion - The pay parity deal has taken the spotlight from the Black Ferns who are making a name for themselves on records with their commitment and effort, writes Jamie Wall. [more]

Monaco flouts 'grid girls' ban
World champion Lewis Hamilton says the return of female models to the F1 grid at this weekend's Monaco Grand Prix is "a beautiful thing". [more]

Monaco flouts 'grid girls' ban
World champion Lewis Hamilton says the return of female models to the F1 grid at this weekend's Monaco Grand Prix is "a beautiful thing". [more]

One dead after car and logging truck collide on Hasting road
One person is dead after a car and logging truck collided on the Hawke's Bay Expressway in Hastings this morning. [more]

Wairarapa rates increases may 'force people from their homes'
Wairarapa residents living in flood-prone areas are confused and angry about a proposal to change the way they pay for flood protection. [more]

'Eventually decile system will go' - Education Minister
The flawed decile system will eventually go but not before finding a system that doesn't further stigmatise children, says the Minister of Education. [more]

Japan airline eyes return to Northern Marianas
Skymark Airlines, Japan's third biggest carrier, is expected to launch direct flights from Tokyo to Saipan in October this year. [more]

Samoa making progress on renewable energy goal
Samoa's government says close to 60 percent of the country's electricity supply is now being produced by renewable sources. [more]

No compensation for missing Malaysia Airlines flight
None of the families of those who disappeared with Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been paid any compensation for their loss. [more]

New child poverty law too narrow - community groups
Community groups have told MPs the proposed law to measure and reduce child poverty is too narrow. [more]

Cop should not have tasered man in the back - watchdog
An Auckland police officer who tasered a man in the back was not justified in using the weapon, the police watchdog has ruled. [more]

Glass manufacturer's profit falls with soft market
Metro Performance Glass has delivered a disappointing result with net profit down 16 percent on last year. [more]

Man arrested on suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts
A man has been arrested on suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts, the Metropolitan Police has said. [more]

Iran lists demands for staying in nuclear deal
Iran's Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has set out several conditions for staying in the nuclear deal with world powers. [more]

NFL clubs to be fined if players kneel during anthem
The American football league said players who do not stand for the Star-Spangled Banner can stay in the locker room until it has been performed. [more]

Expired drugs, patients sleeping on floor at Solomons hospital
More revelations have surfaced about the sorry state of the main national hospital in Solomon Islands. [more]

American Samoa may not join Pacific Islands Forum - US
The US Assistant Secretary of State for Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Islands has indicated that American Samoa may not not join the Pacific Islands Forum as a full member. [more]

Webster gets another shot at redemption with Breakers
Troubled basketballer Corey Webster is getting a third chance with the New Zealand Breakers. [more]

Fishing industry lies revealed in leaked report
Some of the country's biggest fishing companies have been under-reporting their hoki catch by hundreds of tonnes, according to a leaked fisheries report. [more]

Sport: PNG Rugby determined to close door on past problems
The Papua New Guinea Rugby Football Union is determined to close the door on past problems and rebuild the game throughout the country. [more]

Sport: PNG Rugby League look forward to busy international calendar
Papua New Guinea has announced a busy international rugby league calendar for 2018 as they look to build on their performances at last year's World Cups. [more]

Man with lollies attempts to grab boy in Wellington
Police are warning local schools and making enquiries after a man tried to grab a boy in the Wellington suburb of Karori yesterday afternoon. [more]

NZ Orion undertaking multiple tasks in the Pacific
The New Zealand Defence Force has sent an Orion on multiple tasks in the South West Pacific over the next five days. [more]

Rio Tinto plans to sell interest in Papua's Grasberg mine
Multi-national mining giant Rio Tinto says it plans to sell its interest in the lucrative Grasberg mine in Indonesia's Papua province for $US3.5 billion. [more]

State opening for Tonga parliament's 2018 session
The 2018 session of Tonga's Parliament will have a state opening today. [more]

Qantas flight makes emergency landing at Auckland Airport
Qantas flight makes emergency landing at Auckland Airport [more]

Policeman indicted over shooting of escapee in New Caledonia
A French policeman has been indicted in New Caledonia over the fatal shooting of a prison escapee in a stolen vehicle. [more]

Keeping House: The role of the Speaker explained
Analysis - From the outside, Parliament's Question Time looks like a scrappy playground at times, and Chris Bramwell writes that it's up to the Speaker to enforce the rules. Watch today's Question Time live here. [more]

PNG authorities seek contact with dead refugee's family
Papua New Guinea's government says efforts are being made to contact the family of a Rohingya refugee who died on Manus Island on Tuesday. [more]

Referees to penalise dummy-half passes
NRL players who deliberately pass the ball at defenders in the ruck to draw a penalty will have the tables turned on them, under a new interpretation of the law effective immediately. [more]

Hawke's Bay teen jailed for life for murder
A 17-year-old who carried out a brutal attack on a man, including stabbing him and stomping on his head to ensure he was dead, has been jailed for life and will spend at least 12 years behind bars. [more]

Qantas flight makes emergency landing at Auckland Airport
The fire service says the source of cabin smoke that forced a Qantas flight to make an emergency landing just minutes into take off was food left in an oven. [more]

Public prosecutor to appeal against Fiji Times verdict
Fiji's public prosecutor will appeal against a High Court decision that found the Fiji Times, its publisher, two editors and a letter writer not guilty of sedition. [more]

Govt needs to do more on climate change - report
The New Zealand government needs to do more on climate change, a new report says. [more]

Street closed in Taupo after gas leak
A street in Taupo is cordoned off following a suspected gas leak. [more]

Charges after drugs found in McDonald's sundaes
A 22-year-old man has been charged after drugs were found in McDonald's sundaes from a west Auckland restaurant last week. [more]

Young New Zealand father dies in Thailand
A young father was celebrating his second wedding anniversary in Thailand when he died suddenly yesterday. [more]

Gales prompts warning to avoid some beaches
Large waves have prompted Civil Defence to warn people away from beaches with gales expected, while snow blankets parts of the South Island. [more]

PNG court allows Schram to leave country
A Papua New Guinea court has allowed the former Vice Chancellor of the University of Technology to leave the country to retrieve his PhD certificate from Italy. [more]

Tempers flare between National and speaker in Parliament
There have been testy scenes at Parliament this afternoon during Question Time, with National's deputy leader thrown out of the House. [more]

Wallabies prop banned for cocaine use
Wallabies prop and Queensland Reds skipper James Slipper has been suspended by Rugby Australia for two months for testing positive to cocaine. [more]

Nurses panel recommends pay rise to avoid strike
The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says a working panel has identified the struggles nurses are facing in the workplace and she hopes the pay dispute can soon be settled. [more]

Trump no longer allowed to block people on Twitter
President Donald Trump may not legally block Twitter users because doing so violates their right to free speech, a federal judge in New York has ruled. [more]

Disease outbreak concern on volcanic Vanuatu island
The threat of infectious disease is an acute concern for communities on Vanuatu's volcanically active island of Ambae. [more]

Tourists cause closure of South Island walking tracks
Some South Island high country farmers have closed walking tracks on their land because too many tourists are causing problems. [more]

Marlborough to 'get on with it, get learning, and get back'
A former Marlborough farmer advocating for people still struggling from the 2016 Kaikōura earthquake says it will be years before the region fully recovers. [more]

Transport Minister stripped of CAA role after phone call on plane
Transport Minister stripped of CAA role after phone call on plane [more]

Political reform inertia in Cook Islands
An advocate for political reform in the Cook Islands says candidates in the upcoming general election need to voice their views on long standing proposals for change. [more]

French Polynesia president presents govt line-up
French Polynesia's president Edouard Fritch has presented his 10-member government after the territorial assembly last week re-elected him for a five-year term. [more]

Moko artist defends controversial work
The artist who did a Pākehā woman's facial moko says he is embarrassed about the racial backlash it has caused. He spoke to RNZ's Te Aniwa Hurihanganui. [more]

AirNZ takes fuel giants to court over pipeline damage
Air New Zealand has filed court proceedings against BP and Z Energy for damages caused by last year's fuel-pipeline rupture north of Auckland. [more]

Power plant spared from Hawaii lava
The restive Kilauea Volcano belched clouds of ash into the skies over Hawaii's Big Island twice more today as a nearby power plant was spared from approaching lava. [more]

MPI defends not prosecuting over hoki catch
The Ministry Primary Industries is defending its decision not to prosecute any big fishing companies found to be under-reporting hoki catch. [more]

Sydney grandmother sentenced to death in Malaysia
A Sydney grandmother has been found guilty of drug trafficking charges in Malaysia and will face the death penalty. [more]

Transport Minister stripped of CAA role after phone call on plane
Transport Minister Phil Twyford has been stripped of some of his responsibilities after making a phone call on a plane after the aircraft doors had shut. [more]

Solomons politician facing corruption charges
Solomon Islands police have arrested the former deputy premier of Makira-Ulawa Province for alleged corruption. [more]

Fiji military officers charged with rape
Four Fiji military officers have each been charged with sexual assault and rape, following an attack on a female officer in March. [more]

PNG cracks down on illegal vanilla trade to Indonesia
Papua New Guinea authorities have implemented a ban on vanilla trade across the border with Indonesia. [more]

Rise in cases of scarlet fever on Saipan
Northern Marianas health authorities have reported a rise in scarlet fever cases on Saipan. [more]

Equipment failure at American Samoa airport
The repaired Instrument Landing System at Pago Pago international airport in American Samoa has failed a flight check. [more]

Half of recreational drone users ignore rules: report
Safety concerns over drone use in New Zealand have been raised after a new report showed only about half of recreational users always comply with the operating rules. [more]

Skiers delight: Snow points to 'absolutely stunning' season
Skifields in the Queenstown Lakes district are predicting a bumper season following overnight snowfall. [more]

EU-NZ trade deal a bright spot in gloomy times
Opinion - The announcement of EU-New Zealand/Australia free trade talks is a welcome bit of sunshine after chilly talk of a trade war offshore, writes Stephanie Honey. [more]

Remembering Bastion Pt: 'Straight out of a Nazi war movie'
Tomorrow marks 40 years since Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei was forcibly evicted from Takaparawhau or Bastion Point in Auckland. [more]

Investigators confirm missile that shot MH17 was Russian-owned
The missile that downed a Malaysia Airlines flight over eastern Ukraine in 2014 belonged to a Russian brigade, international investigators say. [more]

North Korea nuclear test tunnels 'destroyed'
North Korea appears to have blown up tunnels at its only nuclear test site, in a move to reduce regional tensions. [more]